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Muckleshoot job posted

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  • Muckleshoot job posted

    Saw that Muckleshoot posted a job, in case you guys are interested, its for a 'fisheries enforcement officer', requires the academy. Looks a lot like a WA wildlife position, looks interesting especially if you like to be out and about in the open.



    I know working for Indian governments, the employment laws are different.
    Anyone worked for one?

  • #2
    It does mention on their HR site that they will select any native American over a non-native. I know of that kind of hiring from other tribal employers, although I have seen non-natives working for Muckleshoot.

    I'd love an outside job like that, I'm sure others do too.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by wildlife97
      I have worked for a tribe and know a lot about the position.

      The job I applied for was with the fisheries enforcement division......Tribal members do not like getting told what to do from a non-tribal member, especially regarding hunting or fishing. And in these positions you don't want to be too aggressive or you might find yourself without a job.
      It's their jurisdiction, and their land. This is the exact reason they practice discrimination. While Muckleshoot will hire non-natives for a variety of positions, I think the Chief you spoke with had a good point here when considering someone for a law enforcement position. It's not the fact you may "find yourself out of a job" because of your actions, but your authority and respect as a non-native will be in question almost at all times by tribal members.

      The Chief likely realized this, and while you have a 4 year degree, there are many more factors he/she must consider while filling a law enforcement division. The first that comes to mind is the "buy-in" of the officer towards the needs of the tribe- respect & honor (in the traditions of the tribe), and commitment from a tribal member is likely stronger around the tribe's outlook, employment, and rules than another applicant that isn't a tribal member.

      Like vet. preference, native preference is a legal form of discrimination- it's their land, their rules.

      I worked for a tribe (in a casino, as a non-native) for a while, and while they do have tribal preference, it really wasn't too bad. I have personal reasons why I wouldn't want to work on tribal land as a law enforcement officer (worker's compensation issues for example), but that's just my opinion.

      That being said, I don't think the above reasons are enough of a reason to NOT apply, but just know there are more factors in consideration than just qualifications on paper alone.
      Last edited by Ryandus; 05-23-2011, 06:52 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by CountyGuy View Post
        I know working for Indian governments, the employment laws are different.
        Anyone worked for one?
        I had good experiences in them, they tend to really take care of their employees while they are working.

        If you get injured on the job, be really careful. They are not subject to WA L&I rules.

        **Edit- Be really careful NOT to get injured on the job, because they are not subject to L&I laws, regulations, and standards. They do have their own system, but I won't comment on that.
        Last edited by Ryandus; 04-14-2011, 03:22 PM.

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        • #5
          Would time spent at this job make you eligible to transfer to other agencies? Do they recognize the training and work experience?

          I personally think the Muckleshoot tribe does good work as far as fish habitat and restoration, way more than the state and other local governments. They are forcing the improvements of thousands of culverts in the state. I do not know about their enforcement of fishermen/hunters, that would interesting to learn about. I have heard stories of tribal hunters getting away with shooting elk in locations (illegal to the tribe and anyone else) where a non-native would have jail time.

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          • #6
            Most tribal police departments do not require CJTC BLEA certification and do not send their officers to the CJTC academy. In order for it to "count" in the sense of being able to lateral, you would have to attend the CJTC BLEA while being employed with them, or any tribal agency. Some of the Tribal departments allow their officers to attend CJTC BLEA on a voluntary basis, some don't.
            www.tacomapolice.org

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            • #7
              This Muckleshoot job requires either 'Washington State Criminal Justice Commission Basic Law Enforcement academy or the Bureau of Indian Affairs Police Academy'.

              I thought a few years ago that there was a cross-jurisdiction agreement signed into law in WA, so that the non-tribal and tribal police forces recognize each other and can have equal powers of arrest in each others territories for serious crimes.
              38 of the 39 sheriffs didn't want this, maybe because of the different levels of training like you point out TPD-R.

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              • #8
                Good info wildlife97, again!

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                • #9
                  I'm applying for a Police officer position with the Coville tribe, they send their guys to BLEA. I know they get the comissions from those two counties, they back up the local departments, but they stay pretty busy themselves.

                  Comment

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