Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

WDFW Oral Board

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • WDFW Oral Board

    Has anyone been through there process? I got the letter and it says it's an all day event; Oral, pre-poly questionnaire, written psych eval, etc.

    Not sure what to expect, I've done the oral board before for other agencies but never for an agency like this where natural resources is part of the job.

    Anyone have any tips, WDFW suggests review some of their licensing manuals and reviewing there web page.
    Ask'em, tell'em, show'em.

  • #2
    I Havent attained my 4 year degree yet, so I havent been in the process with WDFW. BUT, I am friends with a SGT(helped him out with nabbing a group of poachers). From what he said, read the pamphlets and get familiar with the hunting and fishing laws. I'm guessing that they wont specifically talk about fish/hunt laws for the entire oral board, but I dont know for sure. I would call the WDFW office and ask for a couple of ride alongs to get familiar with how they police. Game wardens are a breed of their own.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by RUKidding View Post
      I've done the oral board before for other agencies but never for an agency like this where natural resources is part of the job.

      Anyone have any tips, WDFW suggests review some of their licensing manuals and reviewing there web page.
      Natural resources isn't part of the job, it is the job!! If you think that your going to be doing "traditional" police work with WDFW then you might not want to go to the oral board. Natural resource law enforcement is truely different than any other police work, you work alone most of the time with backup often an hour or more away.

      If you haven't done so, schedule a ride along so you can see what they do. You really need to be a hunter/fisher in order to do well with this agency...

      As for studying go ahead and study the hunting/fishing/trapping pamphlets and read up on the terminology. You will need to study the big game hunting pamphlet, sport fishing pamphlet, turkey hunting pamphlet, waterfowl pamphlet, and trapping pamphlet. Happy reading!

      Any other ?s let me know!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bartlett2850 View Post
        From what he said, read the pamphlets and get familiar with the hunting and fishing laws. I'm guessing that they wont specifically talk about fish/hunt laws for the entire oral board, but I dont know for sure. I would call the WDFW office and ask for a couple of ride alongs to get familiar with how they police. Game wardens are a breed of their own.
        Hunting/fishing laws is a major part of the oral board, however they also ask questions regarding to the other activities they do such as dangerous wildlife complaints. For example in a city pd oral board you might get a question asking, "you get a call for an assualt possibly involving injuries, what do you do?" Well you will not get that question from WDFW because responding to assaults is not part of their mission, instead you might get the following question "You get a call for a cougar attack on a young child at a park, what do you do while en-route to the park?" Same kind of idea as the assault call but different circumstances.

        But you are definately correct in saying game wardens are a breed of their own, most city and county officers I've talked to say there is no way in he** they would ever put themselves in the situations that WDFW officers put themselves in day in and day out. This is mainly due to the fact that WDFW Officers are usually in the middle of nowhere where backup (from any agency) could be an hour or more away, and the fact that most people that WDFW Officers contact have a weapon, since they are fishing (most carry a knife) or hunting (carrying a gun or archery equipment)

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks Wildlife97, lots of good information. I have a ride along in the morning with an Officer Klein(spelling?) out of Olympia. I'll pick his brain the best I can, get his opinion of the agency.

          I have mostly done fishing in my life, mostly lakes, grew up in King County so not much hunting. I do have family members who are very active hunters who get tags for Montana annualy and fish year round.

          I did read the report on WDFW website from the IACP about the staffing and current issues at the department, hopefully command staff is working on bettering some of those issues?

          I did hear another rumor that the DNR officers might possibly be absorbed into WDFW, and I heard that DNR and WDFW might be absorbed in to WSP; any truth to these that you hear?
          Ask'em, tell'em, show'em.

          Comment


          • #6
            While being a hunter or fisherman will certainly help you understand the law better, you do not have to BE one in order to be a game warden. I know many WDFW officers and game wardens in other states who are not and never were hunters or fishermen. It's more about desire than knowledge, and the agency is going to teach you what they want you to know about hunting and fishing, anyway.

            Like I said, there IS an advantage to be had in knowing the law. For example, game wardens who happen to be waterfowl hunters usually have an advantage straight out of the academy in catching waterfowl violators when compared than someone who has never hunted waterfowl before. However, as you learn the job, the gap between what a non-hunter and a hunter knows about that job will narrow considerably.

            One of the best game wardens I ever knew was a military officer who had absolutely NO hunting or fishing experience, having grown up in suburban NY.

            What you absolutely DO need to have is a love for the outdoors, a willingness to protect the resource, ethics, and an understanding that there has to be balance: natural resources can be legally taken/harvested, but within the parameters set by the law (ethics intertwines with that on other levels, too, as you'll discover).

            As previously mentioned, you'll likely take risks and make sacrifices that many LEO's won't have to make, simply because they have a better infrastructure and can support one another better. You won't know it at the time because you'll be having so much fun (), but the risks will be there, nevertheless. You also need to be someone who can work without supervision and get the job done, not needing to have someone either crack the whip to make you work OR hold your hand and guide you in what to do (except at first, of course).

            So, self-starter, motivated, ethical, and a desire to protect natural resources. Basically all you need.

            Good luck.
            "Sir, does this mean that Ann Margaret's not coming?"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by RUKidding View Post
              I did read the report on WDFW website from the IACP about the staffing and current issues at the department, hopefully command staff is working on bettering some of those issues?

              I did hear another rumor that the DNR officers might possibly be absorbed into WDFW, and I heard that DNR and WDFW might be absorbed in to WSP; any truth to these that you hear?
              Well they are trying to work on the staffing issues however with the current state budget it is hard to hire the bodies that IACP report suggests, eventually when the state gets money the staffing should go up.

              The talk about DNR officers moving to WDFW has been talked about for the last several years. DNR only has about 10 officers including the chief. The governor has talked about streamlining govt and suggesting maybe merging all of the natural resource agencies (WDFW, DNR, Parks, Ecology and possibly Agriculture) so it probably won't happen until then. WDFW and DNR Officers have somewhat of the same duties but they do differ, especially since DNR Officers are not full-authority. The merger with WDFW and WSP was a proposal from the governor however WDFW and the State Police Chiefs and Sheriffs Assoication worked hard to get that shot down before there was any momentum, so it will not happen with this regime of senators and representatives. Only two states have their fish & wildlife enforcement with their state patrol, those two being Alaska and Oregon, and Alaska is going to be changing that within the next couple years, so obviously it doesn't work.. Send me a pm sometime if ya want more info

              Comment


              • #8
                Some of the counties have been "deputizing" the DNR officer's to help fill in the gap of legal authority. I know Lewis County Washington has "deputized" two DNR officers so that they can have full law enforcement authority in Lewis County. Sheriff Mansfield mention's this on his Lewis County Sheriff home page.

                Comment

                MR300x250 Tablet

                Collapse

                What's Going On

                Collapse

                There are currently 2888 users online. 168 members and 2720 guests.

                Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                Welcome Ad

                Collapse
                Working...
                X