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  • Bill named after Navy SEAL Chris Kyle to be signed into law

    A bill named after Navy SEAL Chris Kyle is set to be signed into Texas law Wednesday. It would fast-track police jobs for veterans.

    Kyle and his friend, Chad Littlefield, were killed in early February at a gun range, allegedly by a veteran they were trying to help.

    Before his death he was working to become a police officer in Dalworthington Gardens. But even though he was considered one of the top snipers in the country, he had to go through the same training as everyone else.

    The bill will allow military veterans to prove their skills and skip out on certain parts of the police academy, streamlining access to employment.

    "We have this pool of skilled people that we need to take advantage of," said Rep. Dan Flynn of Van Zandt County, who sponsored the bill.

    He called it a "jobs bill."

    Dalworthington Gardens Police Chief Bill Waybourn said a range officer who Kyle once coached in baseball was going to have to supervise him for 60 hours of gun range training.

    "Seemed a little silly," he said.

    The bill also allows military spouses expedited state licensing for some careers.

    Read more: http://www.myfoxdfw.com/story/232776...#ixzz2dIpoWZl0

    http://www.myfoxdfw.com/story/232776...igned-into-law
    Not sure how I feel about this. I don't think anybody being the best sniper in the USA translates into being tactically sound as a police officer. I understand fast tracking some skills for some careers, but I'm not sure this is good for law enforcement. Any thoughts? Maybe I'm just way off base.
    "To hell with a supervisor, men follow a leader" -Texas Ranger Captain Allee

    "Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys; look on them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death."
    -Sun Tzu

  • #2
    I dont think you are off base. I approve of anything that gets vets jobs (I am active duty Navy right now), but I agree, I dont see how a sniper translates to a patrol officer. Now, if he was a MA/MP/SP, I could see it, depending on what functions that person actually already had training in. But, even in that, I think a lot of places already do this. I know Florida does.

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    • #3
      I don't really understand the point. If he where to skip firearms training would he really graduate early from the academy? It's not streamlining anything. We veterans already get special treatment in the hiring process. More special treatment is just going to create a rift in the academy between recruits and fight against creating a teamwork environment.

      Comment


      • #4
        I am a current Scout Sniper in the Marine Corps and an aspiring future Police Officer. While I would naturally appreciate anything that helps me get hired, in no way would I want to skip any part of the Police Academy! Even though I have personally received a great deal of firearms training, been though a few shooting packages including a Tier 1 Group course, I am sure I will still learn a great deal from Police firearms instructors. Additionally, I feel as though if anything, range time will be a great opportunity to continue to train and improve my skills. Just my 2 cents.

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        • #5
          Is this that much of a barrier to employment for military personnel, or political grandstanding? A great many military personnel are support and have little experience with weapons. Most former military are not Tier I war fighters. If your MOS is a clerk typist or a mechanic should you really be skipping parts of the academy? While there have been times I would love to call in indirect fire on a residence, I doubt that an Artillery MOS would have applicable experience to skip parts of the academy either.

          That being said I have seen many officers who were less than proficient with their firearms, and they made it through and academy.

          I just don't see this as a big problem.
          Ut humiliter opinor

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          • #6
            While I believe that we should always honor our veterans, I see this as pure BS grandstanding of the worst sort. It doesn't matter how much or how little training one has gotten in the military. Unless the veteran was specifically trained in that particular agency's methodologies, then they need to do the training. Not all "firearms training" involves actually shooting. Allowing a candidate to skip any portion of the academy sets that agency up for a lawsuit.

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            • #7
              Impressed with the fellas not in who are in the Military. Good mindset fellas and God Bless you.
              Thank you for all your services to our Country.
              MDRDEP:

              There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by jr03 View Post
                I am a current Scout Sniper in the Marine Corps and an aspiring future Police Officer. While I would naturally appreciate anything that helps me get hired, in no way would I want to skip any part of the Police Academy! Even though I have personally received a great deal of firearms training, been though a few shooting packages including a Tier 1 Group course, I am sure I will still learn a great deal from Police firearms instructors. Additionally, I feel as though if anything, range time will be a great opportunity to continue to train and improve my skills. Just my 2 cents.
                I have to disagree with you, I served in the Corps as well. You haven't been through the academy yet, just wait...the instructions and firearms qual is mind numbingly easy and IMHO, some things they teach are down-right dangerous.

                I believe people might be taking this out of context slightly, or maybe I am...but what I got from this, is that they would only be allowed to skip certain portions of the training, such as firearms, where that military specific training has exceeded the state standard training. If you're going to sit here and try to tell me a Navy SEAL needs to go through state-certified LE firearms training, I will LAUGH at your face, every time. At least in Ohio, the firearms training is a complete JOKE.

                I do not see an issue with this bill at all. They will still have to go through the law, search, seizure, stops, FTO, etc. etc.

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                • #9
                  More firearms training the better, IMO.

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                  • #10
                    Myself being prior military police that is sniper certified and has passed swat school along with CQC school (Close Quarter Combat), I would still want all the training they offer. On the other hand, i wish there was a way to speed up the hiring process when it comes to PD being that if you already have a DOD Secret or TS security clearance, then why do you need to go through another 2-4 month background check. Id say if your within a year after you where honorably discharged and have been in no trouble since then, and your military records are clean I would say you could be at the front of the line....that’s my own opinion

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I don't see anything wrong with this. It's not because I'm a vet but if a veteran proves that they are proficient in a certain part of training at the academy than why not let them skip that part. Now a navy seal like Chris Kyle IMO him being a LEO is a downgrade I'm also sure that him being a sniper he can out shoot most officers on a department. This is just my opinion. You also have to keep in mind of how little a number of veterans are when it comes to civlians at a LE academy. You would have like 30 people but 2 veterans and if one decided to skip a certain part of training cause one was a MPand the other one was a supply clerk. Than is that really so bad.

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                      • #12
                        We have a 35 week academy, firearms training comes to about 3 of those weeks. Is fast tracking really feasible? You still have to learn the law and pass the state licensing exam, then you have firearms, driving, and other practical training. Once you get your license, we still have about 3 months of scenario and reality based training.

                        So what do you do? go through the academy, take 2 weeks off, then come back? graduate early? so you are in Class 330.5? It makes no sense. Helped them get hired...yes. Once you're in the academy, you have a job and you are being paid. Just go through the whole thing and build that camradarie with your classmates.

                        If you're in an academy that doesn't pay, well that's a different story.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Crims0n7 View Post

                          So what do you do? go through the academy, take 2 weeks off, then come back? graduate early? so you are in Class 330.5? It makes no sense.
                          Exactly. I just don't see how this will help at all? The law was obviously made by people who just don't have a clue on how a Police academy works.

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                          • #14
                            TMG hit it right on the head!!!!

                            I would be ok with something of the sorts...

                            A law that would allow a military veteran such as Chris Kyle to take on an assistant role after passing all the mandated firearms qualifications required by a particular academy. He would still be attending the same amount of hours as far as training and would have given some pointers and knowledge to the rest of the class. I think that if someone's military qualifications are above and beyond that of the TCOLE instructor requirements, hell let them assist with the class part that's their speciality. They would still be a part of their class, they would still get the same hours and they would still see it taught how police instructors wanted it taught.
                            "If you find yourself in a fair fight, your tactics suck"

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