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  • Caucasian Law Enforcement Association - wow...

    http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/...n/6957475.html

    Oh, he knew it would cause a fuss.

    But Harris County Deputy Daniel McCool said no one else is standing up for equality of opportunity in local law enforcement. So, two months ago he founded the Caucasian Law Enforcement Association.

    McCool said the organization grew out of his skepticism about the integrity of the hiring practices of Sheriff Adrian Garcia. McCool has no evidence of wrongdoing, but said he believes some employees have been hired or received plum assignments “just because (they) know somebody or just because of an affirmative-action-type decision.”

    A sheriff's spokesman insisted there is no discrimination in personnel decisions.

    “All hirings are done on merit and qualifications,” said Alan Bernstein, the sheriff's director of public affairs.

    More than one administrator suppressed a snicker at Monday's Commissioners Court agenda briefing when it was mentioned that the group was seeking to have membership dues deducted from county paychecks.

    McCool, 47, is a 20-year veteran of the Sheriff's Office and works out of its Mission Bend storefront. He claims 30 members in his association. Five have requested payroll deductions.

    Precinct 1 Commissioner El Franco Lee laughed when he was asked about the group after Tuesday's Commissioners Court meeting.

    “I would withhold any thoughts about that,” he said. “I just don't know what it is and what they're trying to accomplish.”

    Deduction request tabled

    Commissioners Court tabled the Caucasian Law Enforcement Association's request, just as it did with requests from two charitable organizations last year. The court asked its human resources director to review the policy on payroll deductions.

    Mexican American Sheriff's Organization President Albert Rivera criticized McCool for weakening the voice of law enforcement labor by making it more difficult to present a unified front to Sheriff's Office management.

    “An organization of this type would seemingly attempt to open up old wounds and create more delay in the healing process” after past racist and discriminatory practices in the department, Afro-American Sheriff's Deputy League President James Phillips said in a news release. “Unless this Caucasian organization can define its philosophy on what it cites as ‘equal opportunity for all,' we will oppose such (a) group.”

    The Harris County Deputies Organization already represents nearly 2,000 members of the force on wages and work conditions.

    “It's going to hurt us to have another group,” Rivera said. “What is it that the union or MASO or the Afro-American League is not doing to help Caucasians?”

    The new association's stated objectives are better working conditions, improving pay and promoting the interests of its members. McCool emphasized he intends to advocate for merit as the primary criterion for hiring and promotion.

    When asked why he uses the word “Caucasian” in the group name, he said, “From a marketing standpoint, the sky's the limit. There are no other groups out there.”

    In 1993, a small number of Houston Police Department employees formed the White Houston Officers Association. The group formed after 106 black and Hispanic officers received promotions as the result of a settlement of a discrimination lawsuit. The association is defunct.

    McCool, who describes himself as a conservative Republican, split with the Harris County Deputies Organization over its endorsement in the 2008 sheriff's election. McCool volunteered for then-incumbent Tommy Thomas. The union backed Garcia, who won and became the county's first Hispanic sheriff.

    No white supremacists

    McCool said the group is open to members from any race or ethnicity and from any law enforcement agency in Texas.

    “There are several hundred groups in the state of Texas that have their name tied to either a heritage or ethnic group to ensure fair representation. Ours is the same,” he said.

    McCool did ask the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission for permission to bar certain people from joining, he said.

    “I didn't want to have any Aryan brothers or any member of a white supremacist group,” McCool said. “At the same time, I didn't want a member of La Raza or a Black Panther group.”
    So I guess the real question at least for me is this.

    Since McCool hit his 20 year mark already he is pretty much guaranteed retirement? Is that why he is trolling the sheriff?
    The beatings will continue until morale improves.

    Originally posted by jcioccke
    After I hit it, I would be disgusted with her

  • #2
    Here is the question I have, If there is an AASDLand a MASO, why not one for the Caucasians?

    Comment


    • #3
      Why not?

      Right now my department recognizes the Latino Police Officer's Association, the Black Police Officer Association, DPA, Dallas FOP, and the Texas Police Officer's Association. What's one more?
      “The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed."

      "You go for a man hard enough and fast enough, he don't have time to think about how many's with him; he thinks about himself, and how he might get clear of that wrath that's about to set down on him."

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by JTShooter View Post
        Why not?

        Right now my department recognizes the Latino Police Officer's Association, the Black Police Officer Association, DPA, Dallas FOP, and the Texas Police Officer's Association. What's one more?
        I agree JT. Our real problem though is the fact that none of the associations have any real power to accomplish anything.
        "Out of every 100 men sent to battle, 10 shouldn't even be there, 80 are just targets, 9 are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a Warrior and he will bring the others back." -Heraclitus

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm going to try to tread lightly and offer my opinion on this topic (for whatever it's worth in this situation):

          In today’s law enforcement, there is ABSOLUTELY no need for a support group for a particular group of people whose commonality is only their skin color, heritage, etc. I'm not to the point of saying that gender groups should be disallowed because this is still a mostly male dominated profession. It is also a mostly white male dominated industry but there is no physical difference between a white male and a black male. Race/ethnic groups like this do nothing but create a division and rift amongst the outsiders who don't identify with said group's commonality. Equally important, it weakens the mission and role of the main police union when fighting for better pay and working conditions for ALL employees.

          “An organization of this type would seemingly attempt to open up old wounds and create more delay in the healing process” after past racist and discriminatory practices in the department, Afro-American Sheriff's Deputy League President James Phillips said in a news release. “Unless this Caucasian organization can define its philosophy on what it cites as ‘equal opportunity for all,' we will oppose such (a) group.”
          This is a hypocritical statement. There are no ifs, ands, or buts about it. As a black man, I will NEVER join an all black law enforcement association, especially at the local level. I'm not even convinced that in today's world that there is merit in joining such an organization at the national level. I am confident in my abilities as a person because I work hard and am educated. My work ethic speaks for itself.

          If the goal of these organizations is to promote a social engagement opportunity for its members, you can still count me out. I don’t want to associate with someone strictly because they are black (or African American as some will have it). I want to associate with people because they have their head square on their shoulders, enjoy watching football, enjoy playing racquetball, likes the outdoors, likes festivals, likes fishing, likes the idea of hunting (but not yet active/good at it), likes live music, loves Michigan State University, etc. If you’re black, white, Asian, or Hispanic, those are all just after-thoughts. Call me an Uncle Tom. I don’t give a rat’s @ss. I’ve been called much worst and am still kicking.

          I don't think it can be denied that in some parts of the country, discriminatory practices still prevail in the hiring and advancement of employees. But be it discrimination against skin color, creed, nationality, who you know, who you don't know, pork lovers, beef lovers, or what have you, an injustice to one, is an injustice to all. We all share in the responsibility to promote an equal opportunity for advancement and equal treatment. Discriminatory practices should not be tolerated. These organizations had their place at the table. I believe we have come so far as a nation (with still a long journey ahead of us) and specifically as a profession, but maintaining these organizations especially at the local level is no longer necessary in achieving the original mission.

          From the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives website:

          NOBLE is committed to equity in matters related to law enforcement, its mission is to ensure equity in the administration of justice, and its unyielding commitment to work towards the elimination of racism and bias of any type within the law enforcement field. This includes a commitment to equal treatment in the administration of justice and within the law enforcement field for all people, regardless of sexual orientation or gender expression.
          This is what everyone should be committed to. In law enforcement, our bond is blue. Nothing else should matter.
          Austin Texas Police Department (APD)

          03/25/10: PT: Passed
          03/25/10: Nelson Denny - Passed
          03/25/10: Writing Sample - Passed
          03/26/10: INI - Passed
          03/26/10: MMP - Passed
          03/26/10: Oral Interview - Passed
          06/07/10: Background Investigation - Passed
          09/07/10: Medical/drug screening - Passed
          09/08/10: Polygraph - Passed
          09/08/10: Psych evaluation - Passed
          09/23/10: Eligibility Roster - #26

          08/15/2011 - Academy Starts

          Comment


          • #6


            Last edited by josephcook78; 06-03-2011, 06:14 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by CopWannabe827 View Post
              I'm going to try to tread lightly and offer my opinion on this topic (for whatever it's worth in this situation):

              In today’s law enforcement, there is ABSOLUTELY no need for a support group for a particular group of people whose commonality is only their skin color, heritage, etc. I'm not to the point of saying that gender groups should be disallowed because this is still a mostly male dominated profession. It is also a mostly white male dominated industry but there is no physical difference between a white male and a black male. Race/ethnic groups like this do nothing but create a division and rift amongst the outsiders who don't identify with said group's commonality. Equally important, it weakens the mission and role of the main police union when fighting for better pay and working conditions for ALL employees.



              This is a hypocritical statement. There are no ifs, ands, or buts about it. As a black man, I will NEVER join an all black law enforcement association, especially at the local level. I'm not even convinced that in today's world that there is merit in joining such an organization at the national level. I am confident in my abilities as a person because I work hard and am educated. My work ethic speaks for itself.

              If the goal of these organizations is to promote a social engagement opportunity for its members, you can still count me out. I don’t want to associate with someone strictly because they are black (or African American as some will have it). I want to associate with people because they have their head square on their shoulders, enjoy watching football, enjoy playing racquetball, likes the outdoors, likes festivals, likes fishing, likes the idea of hunting (but not yet active/good at it), likes live music, loves Michigan State University, etc. If you’re black, white, Asian, or Hispanic, those are all just after-thoughts. Call me an Uncle Tom. I don’t give a rat’s @ss. I’ve been called much worst and am still kicking.

              I don't think it can be denied that in some parts of the country, discriminatory practices still prevail in the hiring and advancement of employees. But be it discrimination against skin color, creed, nationality, who you know, who you don't know, pork lovers, beef lovers, or what have you, an injustice to one, is an injustice to all. We all share in the responsibility to promote an equal opportunity for advancement and equal treatment. Discriminatory practices should not be tolerated. These organizations had their place at the table. I believe we have come so far as a nation (with still a long journey ahead of us) and specifically as a profession, but maintaining these organizations especially at the local level is no longer necessary in achieving the original mission.

              From the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives website:



              This is what everyone should be committed to. In law enforcement, our bond is blue. Nothing else should matter.
              I gotta say. This is probably one of the best posts I've read on this site in a long time. Very well said.
              "Good people sleep well in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to commit acts of violence on their behalf."

              Comment


              • #8
                Yep well stated and can't argue with a word he said. The problem is, at least where I am from, all of the organization that represent a specific ethnic group, claim exactly the quote he used from NOBLE. In practice however, they push a very racial agenda. I can't support any group that feels the need to identify themselves with any ethnic identifier. I also agree that it still is harder for women in policing, however I can't support any sort of female policing organization, because by it's very name it pushes division rather then equality. In the relatively short time I have been in policing, I have seen female officers make great strides in my department and believe that it is almost a non-issue. There may have been a time when such organizations had a legitimate purpose in changing things for the positive, but in my opinion they no longer demand equality, they demand special treatment.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well said copwannabe. I'm a hispanic male and you'll never see me join any sort of hispanic organization. What for? I will admit though, I'm glad to see someone try to start a professional organization with the word Caucasian in it. I always thought it was stupid that we an have all these organizations for "minorities" but the regular old white dude just trying to make it has to be satisfied with the fact he was born white. It's all just dumb.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ours all started out back when the "good ol' boy" way of handing out promotions and what not was still in play (seems we're returning to it) and were designed to help fight discrimination back in the 70s/80s. Now they're just in the way. One reason our PD can never get anything accomplished is because we're divided between ourselves and out "unions".

                    Personally I'd rather not be apart of ANY union, as I feel that they're all "fighting for us all" but where I work, you need to be apart of one (if not two) just for the legal side of things.
                    “The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed."

                    "You go for a man hard enough and fast enough, he don't have time to think about how many's with him; he thinks about himself, and how he might get clear of that wrath that's about to set down on him."

                    Comment

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