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Do agencies share copies of applications during background?

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  • Do agencies share copies of applications during background?

    I was having a conversation with a colleague regarding background investigations.

    Almost every single application for any PD will have a section where the applicant will have to write all the previous departments he/ she has applied for.

    The question is what do BI's do with this information

    1) Does a BI actually request a copy of applications to other agencies?

    2) Does the BI just call to see what the status is of the applicant?

    3) Does the BI just keep the information on file?

    My friend was saying that he thinks the BI will request an actual copy of the application to the other department(s) to compare with the one submited to his agency.

    I say this is not feasible because that would be simply too much workload for all agencies involved. I don't think agencies have the manpower to be sending dozens, if not not hundreds, of copies of applications every day to other agencies around the country.

    Personally I don't even think the BI will go down the list and call every agency and applicant has applied for. I think they just keep it on hand simply as part of the file. Maybe if it's in the same state or same county, the BI will actually place a call or something, but other than that, I doubt it.

    What does everyone else think?
    Last edited by PS100; 05-09-2009, 09:37 PM.
    FHP:

    1) APPLICATION: 03/2010
    2) PAT: 06/2010 PASSED
    3) POLYGRAPH: 11/2010 PASSED
    4) PSYCHOLOGICAL: 1/2011 PASSED
    5) MEDICAL AND VISION: 2/2011 PASSED
    6) BACKGROUND: PENDING
    7) COLONEL'S DECISION: PENDING
    8) ACADEMY: PENDING

  • #2
    When I was doing backgrounds, one of the first things I did was look and see where else an applicant applied. Then I sent the other agency a copy of the applicant's release and asked them for copies of his application, personal history statement and the background they did on him.

    It made my work a lot easier by seeing what dirt they had dug up on him in their background. Of course I had to independently verify whatever they found. but it was a quick shortcut for me.

    In addition, comparing the application and personal history statement the applicant gave me against what he filed with them allowed me to see if he lied to either to us.
    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks, that makes sense in terms of benefit to the background investigator, but doesn't that create an enormous amount of work for the other agencies? Wouldn't they be swamped by same requests from other agencies? Did you ever have an agency refuse a request to send a copy of a file? Just curious.
      FHP:

      1) APPLICATION: 03/2010
      2) PAT: 06/2010 PASSED
      3) POLYGRAPH: 11/2010 PASSED
      4) PSYCHOLOGICAL: 1/2011 PASSED
      5) MEDICAL AND VISION: 2/2011 PASSED
      6) BACKGROUND: PENDING
      7) COLONEL'S DECISION: PENDING
      8) ACADEMY: PENDING

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by PS100 View Post
        Thanks, that makes sense in terms of benefit to the background investigator, but doesn't that create an enormous amount of work for the other agencies? Wouldn't they be swamped by same requests from other agencies? Did you ever have an agency refuse a request to send a copy of a file? Just curious.
        Nope. That's what clerical staff are for. - to make copies. They just shove the background package into Mr. Xerox, face up and push the copy button.

        Background Investigators talk to each other all the time about applicants they have worked on. It's all part of the process. If you would like to get a better feel for the background process, take a look at http://www.post.ca.gov/selection/bim/bi.pdf
        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

        Comment


        • #5
          If possible, make copies of all your application/background packets from agencies from which you applied. You can revert back to those if you need to in the future. Most of the agencies that conduct thourough backgrounds, will request copies of the applications. Don't assume these BI will not go down the list and call every agency.
          When seconds count, we are ONLY minutes away!!!

          Comment


          • #6
            So my question is.... If you get a bad background from an agency are you done forever? Its getting to the point where the only people that can be cops is 21 year old kids that lived at home with mommy and daddy and never did anything wrong.

            And if that is the case how can they be sympathetic to the criminals or victims?

            All these BI's that departments do, still don't prevent corruption or mistakes officers make. I think BI's need to stick to Criminal history, drug history, and employment history. Everything else is just opinion and conjecture. I know for a fact that my last supervisor was ****ed with me for getting out of the Army. He gave me a bad reference and basically lied said I did not show up to work and as well as other things that were untrue. If I had done those things that he suggested I would have gotten Article 15's and been kicked out, rather than receiving an honorable discharge. So now I have to tell other agencies that this BI was done with another department, which the get a copy of and read the same lies.

            The polygraph I think is a great tool still, people are so scared of that thing that they spill their guts. However it should not be the cure all.
            Last edited by Raidergx; 05-12-2009, 09:29 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              The fact that one agency DQed you, in and of itself, is not sufficient for a blanket DQ by all subsequent agencies. You are only done forever if whatever is in your personal history is serious enough to meet the criteria for rejection with other agencies that you apply for.

              Investigators should inquire into the facts surrounding the rejection for your previous positions. Resulting information must be carefully verified and evaluated; it should not automatically be assumed that the previous investigation was unbiased, thorough, and complete. Furthermore, different agencies may have different minimum standards (including age, education, drug use, residency, etc.); therefore, the investigator should assess whether the reasons for such a rejection are relevant to the present employer.

              Another employer's reason for rejection is not automatically relevant. Agencies should reject unsuitable candidates based on their own job-relevant criteria and not those of another agency (especially if those reasons have not been independently verified or deemed irrelevant, outdated, or otherwise inapplicable).

              Bad employment references from government agencies are usually not accepted, based on one verbal statement. Instead, they are usually corrorborated by the employee's written performance/fitness/evaluation reports and comments from other co-workers, managers and supervisors.

              While I can't speak for the departments that have done your background, traditionally, a lot of care usually goes into ensuring they are accurate and thorough. OTOH, if you are applying with podunk PDs where the background consists of Sgt. JimBob just making a couple of phone calls, then you may be out of luck.

              As indicated in my previous post, if you would like to get a feel for how they are are done, take a look at http://www.post.ca.gov/selection/bim/bi.pdf
              Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

              Comment


              • #8
                Furthermore, drives me nuts... Is the applicant has no right to refute or even make a statement. The standard "Tell me anything now that you know might come up." This means read your supervisors mind and tell the BI what he thinks about out if bad.

                I truly thought I had a good relationship with my supervisors in the Army. I got along with everyone well. It was a total blindside that I was hit with what he(supervisor) said in my Oral review board. Now I am in the Oral board trying to defend my good name and they weren't buying it because they already had their minds made up before you even enter the room.

                I have never committed a crime ever, not even a traffic ticket, I have never done any kind of drugs ever Poly twice to verify that. But when it comes to employment history I get banged up.

                Comment

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