Ad JS

Collapse

Leaderboard

Collapse

Leaderboard Tablet

Collapse

Leaderboard Mobile

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Racial profiling

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Racial profiling

    Fair
    63°F


    Weather Forecast...

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    Sunday, September 21, 2008
    HomeNews
    Local NewsOpinionsNational NewsBreaking NewsBusinessSports
    Local SportsNational SportsClassifieds
    JobsAutosReal EstateClassifiedsPlace An AdObituariesEntertainment
    Horoscope LifestylesServices
    Contact UsSubscribePhotos








    Leader links immigration drive, racial profiling

    on 09-19-2008 22:18


    By JIM BARON

    PROVIDENCE — “Racial profiling exists,” Progreso Latino executive director Ramon Martinez told the state advisory committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Friday. “It is happening. It is a process that is going on.”

    By JIM BARON

    PROVIDENCE — “Racial profiling exists,” Progreso Latino executive director Ramon Martinez told the state advisory committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Friday. “It is happening. It is a process that is going on.”
    The advisory committee held a day-long “public briefing” at the Statehouse Friday, hearing from an array of experts from law enforcement, the legal system, community organizations and academia about the phenomenon often referred to as “driving while black” — minority motorists being disproportionately stopped by police, and being subject to more frequent vehicle searches than Caucasian drivers.
    “You have significant distrust by communities of color with law enforcement agencies in Rhode Island, both State Police and local law enforcement agencies,” Martinez testified. “There is very low confidence in the capabilities of law enforcement agencies. They perceive state and local police as being insensitive to the cultural dynamics and needs of our communities. Look at the make-up of the police forces: there isn’t very much diversity.”
    Martinez connected the already controversial racial profiling issue with another hot-button topic in Rhode Island, illegal immigration.
    “Immigration and racial profiling are becoming interrelated, discordant and divisive issues in Rhode Island that impact all of us,” he said.
    Stoking that divisiveness is a “pernicious, insidious group” that is “espousing bigotry and racism,” he said. “It is called Rhode Islanders for Immigration Law Enforcement, RIILE.” Martinez linked RIILE with the national group FAIR (Federation for American Immigration Reform), which he said has ties to white supremacist and neo-Nazi groups.
    “What’s really horrible is that our state government and our General Assembly are receiving advice from RIILE in making over 36 anti-immigration legislative bills,” he added. “And what’s really sad is that some members of our General Assembly are members of RIILE and they go on the Dan Yorke Show, they go on the Helen Glover Show and they also go on the John DePetro Show (three radio talk shows) with RIILE to talk about these issues.
    “Our communities are disengaged. That is the impact that people fail to see,” Martinez said. “There are many moving parts to this engine.”
    Asked about Martinez’ comments, Terry Gorman, RIILE executive director, said, “That’s the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever heard anyone say. The more things he says like that, the more foolish he looks. Anyone who knows me and knows the members of RIILE know that’s a foolish statement.”
    He said there is not an anti-Hispanic motive behind RIILE’s push for immigration reform.
    “I would like to throw the illegal alien Irish bartenders out of Newport,” Gorman said, as well as Russian immigrants living here who entered the country illegally.
    Col. Brendan Doherty disputed that racial profiling is happening, at least by State Police, but said, “Someone shouldn’t be stopped unless they have committed a motor vehicle violation and a search should be based on probable cause.”
    “One of the phrases we have come to realize is true is that perception is reality,” said Deputy Attorney General Gerald Coyne. “So even if there is a perception that young minority motorists are being stopped, we can talk about numbers all we want, but that perception has to be addressed.
    “In terms of the general characterization that ‘it is happening all the time,’ the numbers do not necessarily bear that out,” Coyne said. “That doesn’t mean there isn’t a problem; I think the perception is something we have to work hard to try to address.
    “One lesson that I have taken away from this after doing it for a number of years is that we have to work very hard to drill down and find out if that perception is fact-supported,” he said. “To the extent that part of this problem is driven by a sense that sometimes the police may draw broad conclusions based on very limited data, I think at least on occasion the same thing can happen when things happen in the community and the same conclusion is drawn about the police.”

  • #2
    bahh humans.
    Last edited by GeneralMelchid; 09-23-2008, 04:26 PM. Reason: was ich bein ein a loco

    Comment

    MR300x250 Tablet

    Collapse

    What's Going On

    Collapse

    There are currently 9193 users online. 328 members and 8865 guests.

    Most users ever online was 19,482 at 11:44 AM on 09-29-2011.

    Welcome Ad

    Collapse
    Working...
    X