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Pennsylvania State Trooper 2021

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  • Pennsylvania State Trooper 2021

    I have been through 3/4 of the PSP process for employment. I have the pt test, medical exam, and psychological test on December 1st and I’m in. I am worried about my medical. I have been diagnosed with chron’s disease, but it is controlled. The PSP has know about this the whole time, as I put it in all the paperwork throughout the process. Will they DQ me for this medical problem? What has been your experiences through the process with medical situations? It does not effect my day to day activities.

  • #2
    I doubt it would disqualify you, seriously.

    Chronic things like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, healed musculoskeletal injuries, etc. that have been controlled without any major complications should not be disqualifying anyone. Especially if your physician is backing you saying that you're safe to perform.

    It would be a different story if you had something such as severe exercise induced asthma, severe mental impediment, cognitive dysfunction, etc.

    You're supposed to be provided reasonable accommodations for medical issues. Reasonable accommodations can include being allowed to take a pill at night to control your issues. Unreasonable accommodations would be having the entire training modified to permit you to participate.

    Not everyone in this process is a healthy 21 year old athlete with good genetics.

    Someone correct me if I am wrong please but honestly, for medical issues which I don't do anything for, I wouldn't even bother documenting. I'd just leave it alone.
    beepser
    Forum Member
    Last edited by beepser; 11-08-2021, 03:14 PM.

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  • #3
    The California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training published a Medical Screening Manual that addresses Crohn's and Colitis in depth. Unfortunately, their website has been down for some time and folks are unable to access the manual on line. While theirs are California's standards, the principles and logic behind them do not stop at the state line and you will find most other states follow similar rules.

    There are a number of issues that can cause Crohn's to be a disqualifying factor. It just depends on a myriad of issues that are too lengthy and complex for me to remember. Y9ou might try calling California's POST HQ in Sacramento and asking if they can email you that part of their manual relating to gastro issues. It may help you a lot.
    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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    • Thunder07
      Thunder07
      Forum Member
      Thunder07 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you!

    • Thunder07
      Thunder07
      Forum Member
      Thunder07 commented
      Editing a comment
      I was able to find the information you pointed out. Sounds like I might have to go through some extra tests just to check the severity of the condition. Thanks for the post.

    • L-1
      L-1 commented
      Editing a comment
      If you have found the POST gastro manual, print it out, take it to you gastro doc and ask him to review it. Then ask him to pretent he is the police department physician who is being paid to look out for their interests and not yours. Finally ask him if he would approve you for hiring based on the standards in that manual, knowing what he does about the severity of your condition. That will give you a ballpark idea as to where you stand.

      Understand that some of Crohn's is stress related and police work involves a lot of stress. Under the worker's compensation laws of most states, if a preexisting condition is made worse by a job related injury (stress), the employer can be on the hook for medical bills for the rest of an employees life to treat it. The employer may also be liable for a disability pension is that exacerbation qualifies the employee for retirement. That alone allows an employer to disqualify a prospective candidate.

      While there are Reasonable Accommodation laws, requiring the employer to incur potentially excessive expenses just to give someone a job is not considered reasonable.

  • #4
    Originally posted by beepser View Post
    I doubt it would disqualify you, seriously.

    Chronic things like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, healed musculoskeletal injuries, etc. that have been controlled without any major complications should not be disqualifying anyone. Especially if your physician is backing you saying that you're safe to perform.

    It would be a different story if you had something such as severe exercise induced asthma, severe mental impediment, cognitive dysfunction, etc.

    You're supposed to be provided reasonable accommodations for medical issues. Reasonable accommodations can include being allowed to take a pill at night to control your issues. Unreasonable accommodations would be having the entire training modified to permit you to participate.

    Not everyone in this process is a healthy 21 year old athlete with good genetics.

    Someone correct me if I am wrong please but honestly, for medical issues which I don't do anything for, I wouldn't even bother documenting. I'd just leave it alone.
    There is NO requirement for an accommodation. Taking a pill is not an accommodation.

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    • beepser
      beepser
      Forum Member
      beepser commented
      Editing a comment
      Where are you getting this from?

      How is taking a pill once at night (assuming its not a controlled substance/doesn't impair your ability to function) not reasonable? If I walked through the dorm rooms of PSP academy right now I'm confident I would find pill bottles (be it Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Claritin, etc.) in some people's hygiene bags.

      Sounds like an ADA lawsuit waiting to happen if everyone with simple medical issues is getting DQ'd especially considering they've passed all tests up until that point. Do you really think that of the thousands of troopers out there and that have previously went through the academy there's not at least a decent amount that had issues like high blood pressure, GI issues, etc?

  • #5
    Crohn's is a miserable disease. A close family member of mine has struggled with it since his teens. At times, like you said, it is "under control", but there is no cure. He is constantly adjusting his medication to reduce flare-ups, mainly steroids and immunosuppressants, which can be a real drag. He experiences a lot of anxiety and stress in certain situations, like being stuck in traffic, taking public transportation, and being in long meetings. Basically anytime there isn't an accessible bathroom close by.

    I could not imagine him being able to cope with the daily activities of a police officer.... working accidents, conducting surveillance, directing traffic for hours at a time, responding to and dealing with all of the different calls for service. We've all experienced a panicky sh*% once in a while where our belt-keepers were off before we hit the bathroom door, but it would really suck if it occurred on a regular basis.

    I'm sure that this is a "dream job" situation for you, as it is for most rookies, but you should really think long and hard about whether this is a career that you can live with for 25 years, given your condition and its potential for creating discomfort in many situations that troopers find themselves in regularly. I hope that your situation is mild and wish you the best of luck.

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  • #6
    There is a medical officer (Doctor) employed by PSP. Your medical will be reviewed most likely by him. If DQ'd you are able to challenge it. Don't worry about what isn't an issue until it becomes one. Good luck to you.

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