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  • This question is for the Candidates that have been through the background investigation process. Does the investigation want to know if you have EVER had any convictions or just felonies? Also, how far back do they go for drug use and arrests? Is there a poly? I have gone through a couple BI's before and found that they were different from one another. Thanks!

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    • What is the date for the next PAT?

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      • Originally posted by grunt999 View Post
        This question is for the Candidates that have been through the background investigation process. Does the investigation want to know if you have EVER had any convictions or just felonies? Also, how far back do they go for drug use and arrests? Is there a poly? I have gone through a couple BI's before and found that they were different from one another. Thanks!
        Hey,

        You have to inform your investigator about all of your arrests, because he/she will find out. If you had a drug arrest in the past your investigator will find out. Court investigators have access to court documents. If drugs were never documented in your files, it might not be wise to admit to using them.

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        • Originally posted by grunt999 View Post
          This question is for the Candidates that have been through the background investigation process. Does the investigation want to know if you have EVER had any convictions or just felonies? Also, how far back do they go for drug use and arrests? Is there a poly? I have gone through a couple BI's before and found that they were different from one another. Thanks!
          I would/did tell my investigator everything...even traffic convictions. ( I gave him a copy of my driver abstract from dmv I had left over from nypd processing) Trust me when I tell you they will find out. The worst thing you could possibly do is lie about something...you will be found out and disqualified immediately. The investigators are very thorough. Plus dont forget the evaluation board...they ultimately decide based on your investigators report. http://www.nycourts.gov/careers/cot/screening7.shtml
          http://i46.tinypic.com/152i8tt.jpg
          NEVER FORGETTING OUR HERO'S

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          • Budget passed last night....In a surprise move, Cuomo lopped off $170 million from the court system budget, bringing cuts to the Office of Court Administration close to a 10 percent reduction he calls for in his executive branch. State Bar Association President Stephen Younger said he hoped that won't force courtrooms to close.The move broke decorum in Albany where the executive branch rarely touches the legislative or judicial budgets as a nod to adhering to the constitutional separation of powers. Read more @ http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?se...ics&id=8037147

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            • Originally posted by Realplayer01 View Post
              Budget passed last night....In a surprise move, Cuomo lopped off $170 million from the court system budget, bringing cuts to the Office of Court Administration close to a 10 percent reduction he calls for in his executive branch. State Bar Association President Stephen Younger said he hoped that won't force courtrooms to close.The move broke decorum in Albany where the executive branch rarely touches the legislative or judicial budgets as a nod to adhering to the constitutional separation of powers. Read more @ http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?se...ics&id=8037147
              I have a feeling that the OCA will not be hiring court officers while Cuomo is governor.

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              • I guess there is nothing to do but go on with our lives and make a decision if/when we ever get called...

                http://completelylegal.lohudblogs.co...0m-budget-cut/

                The state spending plan that was settled over the weekend will bring deep cuts to many areas of state government, not the least of which will be the courts.
                The plan slashes $170 million from the Office of Court Administration, which oversees and funds all courts — from village justice courts to the Court of Appeals — and has court officials reeling over how to absorb the cuts. The reduction is roughly 6.3 percent of the court’s current budget.
                State lawmakers originally wanted to cut $270 million, or 10 percent. The state’s top judge, Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman (pictured, above), volunteered to cut $100 million by eliminating, among other services, courthouse child care centers, grants for town and village courts and a program that pays retired judges to work part time as judicial hearing officers.
                Now Lippman and other administrative judges around the state must find ways to cut an additional $70 million in spending.
                “What is clear is this will be painful by any standards,” he said. “There will be more more spending cuts, layoffs and hardship that anticipated. It will have a tremendous impact on the system.”
                It’s too early, Lippman said, to know the number of court employees will lose their jobs, but he said that every kind of court employee will be be targeted for reductions.
                “There will absolutely be a workforce reduction with a lot of layoffs,” he said. “There will be very significant cuts. It is a night and day difference between $100 and $170 million.”
                Lippman, who lives in Rye Brook, said he didn’t yet know how the cuts statewide would affect the 9th Judicial District, which covers Westchester, Rockland, Putnam, Dutchess and Orange counties. Different areas of the state would be affected differently, he said.
                “We’re going to prioritize and figure out where to go from here,” he said. “I’m an optimist and I’ll do everything I can to keep the judiciary viable and strong. But this is certainly going to test us. This is tough stuff.”

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                • This one really hurts ... any silver lining anywhere ?

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                  • Looks like the Chief Judge is scratching the Governor's back this fiscal year. Is there anyone, who has been going through the hiring process, been told that the process will now stop due to the cuts? With this news I am just wondering if they will continue with PAT's and BI's. If they do there might be a slim chance they will still have an academy for NYC, but when who knows. For the rest of us we just have to stay in shape and stay out of trouble for the next fiscal year. I have a feeling the Chief Judge will not be scratching so deep.

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                    • Joel Stashenko and Daniel Wise ContactAll Articles
                      New York Law JournalMarch 29, 2011
                      Print Share Email Reprints & Permissions Post a Comment

                      Governor Andrew M. Cuomo is flanked by Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, left, and Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos during a news conference Sunday announcing a tentative $132.5 billion budget that would be historic for its spending cuts as well as its timeliness.
                      AP/Mike Groll

                      ALBANY - "Hundreds" of nonjudicial employees may lose their jobs due to $70 million in additional cuts imposed on the Judiciary in a state budget to be approved this week, Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman said yesterday.

                      Court officials already had offered to cut $100 million from their $2.7 billion budget plan, and they were surprised that the spending deal for the year that begins Friday reached over the weekend demanded more sacrifice.

                      Judge Lippman said he could not identify where the layoffs would occur or give a more precise number. He said it will depend on where court workers are situated and how crucial employees are to everyday court operations.

                      Judge Lippman said he remains adamant about keeping open court buildings to all comers, despite the state's fiscal woes.

                      "Exactly what the impact is we are going to look at that," Judge Lippman said in an interview. "The governor is doing his job, the Legislature is doing its job and we have been trying to preserve the other branch of our government. Everyone does their part in the equation but, unfortunately, we do not have our seat at the negotiating table."

                      Court administrators had hoped to avoid all but a modest number of layoffs by leaving vacant many positions left open by this year's early retirement program, freezing hiring and making other economies, such as a suspension in hiring of judicial hearing officers.

                      But the fiscal picture becomes more bleak with a $170 million—or 6.3 percent—cut, Chief Administrative Judge Ann Pfau said.

                      "We will look at everything," she said. "But I don't think there is any way we can avoid significant layoffs, given the new cuts."

                      The courts employ about 15,200 non-judicial workers, approximate 1,100 less than three years ago.

                      Judge Pfau held a conference call yesterday with administrative judges to try to devise a plan to deal with the new cuts.

                      Victor A. Kovner of the Fund for Modern Courts called the proposed $70 million in new cuts "dreadful" for their potential effect on the court system.

                      Judge Lippman said the number of layoffs could be reminiscent of the temporary cuts of between 400 and 500 in the early 1990s during a showdown over the Judiciary budget between Mr. Cuomo's father, Mario, and the then-chief judge, Sol Wachtler (NYLJ, April 10, 2007).

                      That dispute was eventually solved amicably.

                      Court and union officials were wary yesterday of how a significant slash in court resources could affect them.

                      Rocco DeSantis, president of the New York State Court Clerks Association, said the court system was already strained from the early retirements.

                      "As a result of positions left unfilled from early retirement, there are already long lines at every office, both those that deal with the public and back offices," he said yesterday. "I am concerned that this is going to make a bad situation worse."

                      About 150 of the state's 1,750 court clerks left the system due to last year's early retirement program, Mr. DeSantis said. Administrators estimate that as of about two weeks ago 91.2 percent in New York City and 93 percent upstate had been replaced.

                      John Strand of the New York State Supreme Court Officers Association said the projected cuts will affect courthouse operations.

                      "We are already down hundreds of court officers throughout the state," Mr. Strand said yesterday. With layoffs, he added, "it is hard not to believe that of necessity court parts, and possibly court houses, will have to be closed."

                      Only 89.3 percent of court officer vacancies in the city and 91.3 percent upstate had been filled by mid-March, leaving 390 open officer jobs in all courts.


                      James F.X. Doyle, president of the New York State County Court Judges Association, said he does not believe there will be adequate security in courthouses to handle both magnetometers and to staff the courtrooms themselves.

                      "There are already delays and it is going to get more severe," Mr. Doyle said. "As a result, cases need to get pushed back and calendars become even more crowded and people serve more time while they are waiting to get their cases resolved."

                      Cortland County Supreme Court Justice Philip R. Rumsey, the president of the Association of Justices of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, said the courts are being ill-used by the governor and the Legislature.

                      "The other two branches are requiring the courts to establish 'worthy programs,' such as the mandatory settlement conferences in foreclosure cases," Justice Rumsey said. "But then they are not providing the resources to do what they have required."

                      Judge Edwina Richardson-Menderson, administrative judge for the New York City Family Court, said she is "extremely concerned" because hers is "a very vulnerable court and we are already quite pressed."

                      But, she said, the court "will have to await the final outcome to determine just what the impact will be."

                      Mr. Cuomo emerged Sunday from a week-long series of meetings with Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, D-Manhattan, and Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos, R-Rockville Centre, to announce a deal on a $132.5 billion spending plan.

                      "State government will have a 10 percent reduction, and it will be shared between the executive, the attorney general's office, the comptroller's office and the Office of Court Administration," Mr. Cuomo said. "We've also made an adjustment in [OCA's] budget."

                      @|Joel Stashenko can be contacted at [email protected]. Daniel Wise can be reached at [email protected].

                      Comment


                      • Todd57-got my date for PAT LAST week. i havent heard anything YET regarding anything being cancelled.

                        "The other two branches are requiring the courts to establish 'worthy programs,' such as the mandatory settlement conferences in foreclosure cases," Justice Rumsey said. "But then they are not providing the resources to do what they have required."

                        I can tell you this...we havent seem ANYTHING yet regarding this point. people will soon be FLOODING the courts to settle their cases with their homes. Its only going to get worse. and the looneys i meet while on my job, im sure, wont be conducting themselves in a mature manner.

                        good to see some numbers regarding how many officers they needed.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Mtn29 View Post
                          Todd57-got my date for PAT LAST week. i havent heard anything YET regarding anything being cancelled.

                          "The other two branches are requiring the courts to establish 'worthy programs,' such as the mandatory settlement conferences in foreclosure cases," Justice Rumsey said. "But then they are not providing the resources to do what they have required."

                          I can tell you this...we havent seem ANYTHING yet regarding this point. people will soon be FLOODING the courts to settle their cases with their homes. Its only going to get worse. and the looneys i meet while on my job, im sure, wont be conducting themselves in a mature manner.

                          good to see some numbers regarding how many officers they needed.
                          At some point as the demand on the courts increases and the staff is trimmed they are going to be "FORCED" to replace the one's who keep everyone safe. they are not going to have any choice. The question is only a matter of when it takes place. Lets all just keep our fingers crossed. This is a situation where i fear more people are going to have to get hurt before they realize their mistake.
                          Last edited by FutureCtOfr; 03-29-2011, 10:02 AM.
                          Test 45-722
                          Rank 21XX
                          was scheduled for january 6th 2011 class that was cancelled

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                          • Like everything else with the city it usually takes a harsh reality like someone getting hurt and suing the Agency to burst the "coorprate" bubble the administration lives in that everyone is safe and no one ever flips out and attacks others. One minute they'll be crying poverty and that they need budget cuts but when the law suits start building up money will come out of no where to bring in more Officers.

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                            • Hi Everyone,
                              I was wondering if anyone from the Central NY area's received any letters yet?

                              Thanks
                              Lee

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                              • Thanks Mtn29. Good luck to you as I'm sure you will ace the process. The state is in deep debt, but I agree with that it will take something horrible to go wrong that the state all of the sudden has the money to remove the freeze. A lot of the states judges do not like the fact right now with the cuts the judicial branch has on it. They see what is coming with all the cuts and courts are already overloaded with cases. The "order" will not be there in some of these court houses. The freeze will not be forever, but at the same time you do not want to see anyone get hurt or worse.

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