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  • Originally posted by KAYNYC View Post
    Congratulations to everyone that passed the PAT!!!! In your letter that stated you passed, did they give you any number specifics or just said you passed? I'm concerned about the part where you have to hold a firearm steady. How many times did you guys knock the sides? Also, any tips for us who haven't taken the test yet?


    Thanks a lot!!!
    They don't give you any specifics, they just stated to me that I passed. You will find out whether you passed or failed before you receive the letter. You will be given a phone number to call one week after the test and that's when you'll find out. Also, before you take the PAT you will fill out/be given a bunch of paperwork that outlines the rest of the process. That is when you get more specific information. You are allowed to hit the sides a bunch of times. I hit at least 9 times and still passed. My only tip is to go hard on all the parts of the test. If you are bad at sit-ups and pull-ups, which I am, give it your all on the other parts of the test. Remember, it's an average score. Doing poorly on one exercise won't fail you if you elevate your performance on most of the other exercises.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Kannons610 View Post
      They don't give you any specifics, they just stated to me that I passed. You will find out whether you passed or failed before you receive the letter. You will be given a phone number to call one week after the test and that's when you'll find out. Also, before you take the PAT you will fill out/be given a bunch of paperwork that outlines the rest of the process. That is when you get more specific information. You are allowed to hit the sides a bunch of times. I hit at least 9 times and still passed. My only tip is to go hard on all the parts of the test. If you are bad at sit-ups and pull-ups, which I am, give it your all on the other parts of the test. Remember, it's an average score. Doing poorly on one exercise won't fail you if you elevate your performance on most of the other exercises.
      Agreed... there are 8 tests which are divided into 4 categories. 2 categories have 3 test each and the remaining 2 categories are single tests (arm-hand steadiness and the step test for stamina).

      I was weakest in the pull-up trainer but I had the most arm endurance of my group of 5 and the leg lift was easy for me since I have been lifting railroad ties for the last 4 years. So in that category I was able to compensate for a weaker test with a strength in another.

      The letter came a week after the test saying that I successfully completed the Physical ability part of the screening process.

      They don't tell you during the test if you are passing or not because they use some formula that takes into consideration you sex, age, height, and weight.

      The arm-hand steadiness isn't that bad. I think I hit the sides like 20 times the first go round but the second time it was probably like 5 times.

      Do some cardio cause they race your around the test quickly and you will still be breathing hard from the last one when you have to start the next.
      Last edited by GRAND; 02-14-2011, 12:29 PM. Reason: add more info

      Comment


      • To those of you that took the pat, I was wondering what the pull up test is like? How much of your own body weight would you say that machine takes off?

        Comment


        • Originally posted by nairb View Post
          To those of you that took the pat, I was wondering what the pull up test is like? How much of your own body weight would you say that machine takes off?
          Go to the NYS Court Officer Trainee Recruitment website and look at the picture of the pull-up machine. It does take off a good deal of weight. You do five on one incline and then move up a level. If you can do five on that level then you move up a level and so on. It gets progressively harder as you complete more.

          Comment


          • hey all congrats to all of you that have passed....I had a simple question....I am scheduled for the pre medical in march at 9 AM and i just wanted to know how long this process took. I have work later on that day at around 1330 and I just wanted to know if I should get my schedule covered. Thank you
            As a Corrections Officer, my fundamental duty is to serve my community; to safeguard the lives and property within my jurisdiction; to protect against deception, oppression or intimidation; to prevent violence or disorder; and to respect and preserve the constitutional rights of all.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by nycboldest21 View Post
              hey all congrats to all of you that have passed....I had a simple question....I am scheduled for the pre medical in march at 9 AM and i just wanted to know how long this process took. I have work later on that day at around 1330 and I just wanted to know if I should get my schedule covered. Thank you
              My appt was at 8:30 and I was out by 10 (in NYC). But there was a much longer line when I left. Your best bet is to get there early. Also, it will prob depend if you are taking it in NYC or Cohoes.

              Comment


              • Re: vision test...I've read that they test you with or without glasses/contacts etc.
                How strict is the process? Do they examine the health of your eyes as well, like an optometrist would during a check up or are they just concerned with the eye chart? Are they shining lights in your eyes to make sure you are not wearing lenses or is it on the honor system? This agency seems very strict with their eye requirements so I'm curious.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by KAYNYC View Post
                  Re: vision test...I've read that they test you with or without glasses/contacts etc.
                  How strict is the process? Do they examine the health of your eyes as well, like an optometrist would during a check up or are they just concerned with the eye chart? Are they shining lights in your eyes to make sure you are not wearing lenses or is it on the honor system? This agency seems very strict with their eye requirements so I'm curious.
                  yes it is very strict most people get disqualified during this process because of eye sight and weight requirements. they dont look at anything else, except for the test that is given and it is a pass/fail exam. they are not concerned with anything else.
                  Last edited by teflondon; 02-18-2011, 12:47 PM.

                  Comment


                  • They do not shine any lights into your eyes. It is pretty much just based on the eye chart and color blindness test. There is no examination of your eyes at all. They tell you that if you have contacts to take them out so your eyes can adjust. It is the honor system, but I would guess that if they found out you were lying you would get disqualified.

                    Comment


                    • Here's an article from Newsday right after the gov released his budget proposal. Notice the bold portion about "no new hiring". This is the first time I have read this anywhere.


                      Editorial from Newsday:
                      Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo spoke softly recently in chiding the state's top judge about his budget, but his message was hard-edged. Get with the program.

                      The court system, an independent branch of government, has long stood above the fray in Albany's annual budget brawls. Not this time.

                      Cuomo has a $10-billion budget crater to fill, and he is seeking to actually cut state spending by 2.7 percent. That's extraordinary for Albany, which usually argues only about the rate of increase. Schools, hospitals and nursing homes are staring at multibillion-dollar cuts, and state agencies have been ordered to slash spending by 10 percent.

                      If his determination to balance the budget without new taxes or borrowing is going to work, no portion of the government can be spared. "I respectfully ask the judicial branch to reduce its spending while continuing to serve those who seek justice," Cuomo said in his Feb. 2 budget message.

                      That was his pointed reaction to the $2.7-billion budget that Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman presented that, depending on how you parse the numbers, is either a slight reduction from last year, or a slight increase. Either way, it doesn't matter. Lippman isn't spoiling for a fight. He said he supports Cuomo's efforts to balance the books and gets it that everyone has to sacrifice.

                      Still, with the courts, it's complicated. The judiciary has a constitutional responsibility to ensure access to justice. Nine of every 10 dollars it spends pays for the 1,267 judges and more than 15,000 employees in 300 courthouses from one end of the state to the other. Deep budget cuts would mean cutting jobs, and officials insist that would mean shutting down courts, something they don't want to do. "We do not have the option of picking and choosing which cases we will hear, or of turning people away," Lippman said Tuesday in his State of the Judiciary address.



                      Cuomo wants the courts to match the 10 percent cuts he's ordered for state agencies under his direct control. That $270 million would be too much too abruptly for the courts, which do have to keep courthouse doors open to the public. A reasonable target is to match Cuomo's 2.7 percent reduction in overall state spending - a $75-million cut for the courts.

                      With caseloads rising, Lippman's proposed budget includes no new hiring,despite vacancies approaching 10 percent. Slashing deeper won't be painless. But cuts of the magnitude Cuomo must make won't be painless for anyone dependent on state funds. Still they have to be done.

                      The court system will have to drive a hard bargain with its major employee union, the Civil ServiceEmployees Association, when its contract expires this spring. Any case for avoiding significant cuts is a hard sell. And it doesn't help that apartments are being renovated in Albany for Court of Appeals judges to use when they're in Albany.

                      Never mind that the seven 400-square-foot units occupy a small portion of a building that Albany city officials asked the state to take over and rehabilitate. Or that the $23 million renovation is practically finished and won't require any money in this year's budget. Appearances matter, and fancy new apartments are an indulgence. But when it comes to savings, they're a distraction.

                      This isn't the first time a governor and chief judge have squared off over spending. In 1991 then-Gov. Mario Cuomo unilaterally slashed the court's budget. Chief Judge Sol Wachtler sued, arguing the constitution required Cuomo to submit the court budget intact to the legislature.

                      The suit was settled, the court got its money, and no governor since has tried to impose cuts on the judiciary. The new Gov. Cuomo isn't doing that now. He made his feelings known, but left the slicing and dicing to court officials and the legislature.

                      But the challenge isn't just to trim next year's spending. With deficits projected for years to come, shaving a million here and a million there won't be enough for the long haul.



                      The time is right to unearth a plan from 2007 to reorganize the state's convoluted court structure. Officials pushed for years for authorization to collapse the nine trial courts into a simpler two-tiered structure. That would better serve the public, for instance, sparing families the hassle and expense of going from Family Court to Supreme Court to criminal court for separate adjudication of matrimonial, custody and domestic violence matters. While it would take years to fully implement, officials said it would save hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

                      That rational plan has languished for want of legislative consent to pursue a constitutional amendment. But it's just the sort of root-and-branch reinvention Albany needs to consider throughout state government.

                      Albany has to cut spending. And Lippman should seize the moment to reorganize the court system into a more efficient, user-friendly branch of government.

                      Comment


                      • edited

                        took a shower and let cooler heads prevail
                        i guess i should think of changing my screen name here
                        hopefully this is a minor setback or maybe will be re-evaluated
                        Last edited by FutureCtOfr; 02-20-2011, 10:02 PM.
                        Test 45-722
                        Rank 21XX
                        was scheduled for january 6th 2011 class that was cancelled

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by FutureCtOfr View Post
                          Somehow i knew this miserable @#$% was going to ruin things for me and my family. Here we were beginning to hope april first would be the start of our futures and now it would seem we are going to be kept on the unemployment line. So happy i didnt vote for him and will make sure not only i but anyone who can hear me will not vote for him next time around too......
                          You should still be next in line IF the class doesn't come around this year. I can't believe the OCA wouldn't hire more COs this year and was surprised to read this. Hopefully it's either wrong or will be changed.

                          Comment


                          • OCA is truly proficient at the use of smoke and mirrors when it comes to hiring. Try to pin them down when it comes to the definition of new hiring.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by CivilServant14 View Post
                              Here's an article from Newsday right after the gov released his budget proposal. Notice the bold portion about "no new hiring". This is the first time I have read this anywhere.


                              Editorial from Newsday:
                              Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo spoke softly recently in chiding the state's top judge about his budget, but his message was hard-edged. Get with the program.

                              The court system, an independent branch of government, has long stood above the fray in Albany's annual budget brawls. Not this time.

                              Cuomo has a $10-billion budget crater to fill, and he is seeking to actually cut state spending by 2.7 percent. That's extraordinary for Albany, which usually argues only about the rate of increase. Schools, hospitals and nursing homes are staring at multibillion-dollar cuts, and state agencies have been ordered to slash spending by 10 percent.

                              If his determination to balance the budget without new taxes or borrowing is going to work, no portion of the government can be spared. "I respectfully ask the judicial branch to reduce its spending while continuing to serve those who seek justice," Cuomo said in his Feb. 2 budget message.

                              That was his pointed reaction to the $2.7-billion budget that Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman presented that, depending on how you parse the numbers, is either a slight reduction from last year, or a slight increase. Either way, it doesn't matter. Lippman isn't spoiling for a fight. He said he supports Cuomo's efforts to balance the books and gets it that everyone has to sacrifice.

                              Still, with the courts, it's complicated. The judiciary has a constitutional responsibility to ensure access to justice. Nine of every 10 dollars it spends pays for the 1,267 judges and more than 15,000 employees in 300 courthouses from one end of the state to the other. Deep budget cuts would mean cutting jobs, and officials insist that would mean shutting down courts, something they don't want to do. "We do not have the option of picking and choosing which cases we will hear, or of turning people away," Lippman said Tuesday in his State of the Judiciary address.



                              Cuomo wants the courts to match the 10 percent cuts he's ordered for state agencies under his direct control. That $270 million would be too much too abruptly for the courts, which do have to keep courthouse doors open to the public. A reasonable target is to match Cuomo's 2.7 percent reduction in overall state spending - a $75-million cut for the courts.

                              With caseloads rising, Lippman's proposed budget includes no new hiring,despite vacancies approaching 10 percent. Slashing deeper won't be painless. But cuts of the magnitude Cuomo must make won't be painless for anyone dependent on state funds. Still they have to be done.

                              The court system will have to drive a hard bargain with its major employee union, the Civil ServiceEmployees Association, when its contract expires this spring. Any case for avoiding significant cuts is a hard sell. And it doesn't help that apartments are being renovated in Albany for Court of Appeals judges to use when they're in Albany.

                              Never mind that the seven 400-square-foot units occupy a small portion of a building that Albany city officials asked the state to take over and rehabilitate. Or that the $23 million renovation is practically finished and won't require any money in this year's budget. Appearances matter, and fancy new apartments are an indulgence. But when it comes to savings, they're a distraction.

                              This isn't the first time a governor and chief judge have squared off over spending. In 1991 then-Gov. Mario Cuomo unilaterally slashed the court's budget. Chief Judge Sol Wachtler sued, arguing the constitution required Cuomo to submit the court budget intact to the legislature.

                              The suit was settled, the court got its money, and no governor since has tried to impose cuts on the judiciary. The new Gov. Cuomo isn't doing that now. He made his feelings known, but left the slicing and dicing to court officials and the legislature.

                              But the challenge isn't just to trim next year's spending. With deficits projected for years to come, shaving a million here and a million there won't be enough for the long haul.



                              The time is right to unearth a plan from 2007 to reorganize the state's convoluted court structure. Officials pushed for years for authorization to collapse the nine trial courts into a simpler two-tiered structure. That would better serve the public, for instance, sparing families the hassle and expense of going from Family Court to Supreme Court to criminal court for separate adjudication of matrimonial, custody and domestic violence matters. While it would take years to fully implement, officials said it would save hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

                              That rational plan has languished for want of legislative consent to pursue a constitutional amendment. But it's just the sort of root-and-branch reinvention Albany needs to consider throughout state government.

                              Albany has to cut spending. And Lippman should seize the moment to reorganize the court system into a more efficient, user-friendly branch of government.
                              Wow!!! I am speechless!!!

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Dinosaur32 View Post
                                OCA is truly proficient at the use of smoke and mirrors when it comes to hiring. Try to pin them down when it comes to the definition of new hiring.
                                What do you mean?

                                Comment

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