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  • Originally posted by shimmydog
    It's take all day like 6 hours but if u show up a few hours early they I'll try and rush you through it hand in all paper work to them the doctor will review it
    Great, thanks so much for the info!

    Comment


    • Originally posted by shimmydog
      It's take all day like 6 hours but if u show up a few hours early they I'll try and rush you through it hand in all paper work to them the doctor will review it
      BTW what time was your appointment, thats a long day! Mine is at 12pm....

      Comment


      • Hey HopeFloats,
        Question: Can you list a quick run down, start to finish what the full medical is about? I know some is basic medical checkup but I am still curious about it.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Law-And-Order1 View Post
          Hey HopeFloats,
          Question: Can you list a quick run down, start to finish what the full medical is about? I know some is basic medical checkup but I am still curious about it.
          As per request; in a nutshell:

          You get in fill out some forms, go upstairs and give them a sample of urine, some guys mysteriously vanished at this point.

          Go back downstairs, wait, go in for a blood pressure test, wait, go in for a lung capacity test, vision and hearing test.

          More waiting...

          Chest x-ray test, wait...

          Go see Doctor, check reflexes, talk about results, medical history, family medical history etc...

          Never ending wait...

          They break the news to you, pass or fail.

          All this takes about 6 hours or more, first come first serve.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by shimmydog
            Mine was at 1130 I showed up at 930 and they took me right away still was there for 6 hours but it could have been longer if I didn't show up so early
            Thanks for the info I'm gonna get there early too so can get started right away too hopefully!

            Comment


            • Originally posted by HopeFloats View Post
              As per request; in a nutshell:

              You get in fill out some forms, go upstairs and give them a sample of urine, some guys mysteriously vanished at this point.

              Go back downstairs, wait, go in for a blood pressure test, wait, go in for a lung capacity test, vision and hearing test.

              More waiting...

              Chest x-ray test, wait...

              Go see Doctor, check reflexes, talk about results, medical history, family medical history etc...

              Never ending wait...

              They break the news to you, pass or fail.

              All this takes about 6 hours or more, first come first serve.

              how was the lung capacity test? what do you do for that?

              Comment


              • Thanks HopeFloats. All the best to all present and future candidates

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Positive Thinker View Post
                  how was the lung capacity test? what do you do for that?
                  You blow into a tube 2 times. No big deal.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by New Job View Post
                    You blow into a tube 2 times. No big deal.
                    Thanks New Job! Best of luck everyone!

                    Comment


                    • For what it's worth:
                      No word from the higher ups as to how we will make this happen. You can't get blood from a stone. We need people.

                      http://rt.com/usa/249457-nyc-shrink-rikers-prison/


                      NYC mayor to shrink Rikers prison population by 25%
                      Published time: April 14, 2015 03:55 Get short URL

                      Reuters / Jorge Silva
                      Tags
                      Court, Crime, Health, Human rights, Politics, Protest, USA
                      More than 400 people have spent two years in Rikers without ever being convicted – a problem New York’s mayor plans to address by shrinking the population by 25 percent over the next 10 years, The New York Times reported.

                      Mayor Bill de Blasio (d) is set to announce a plan Tuesday to reduce the inmate population at Rikers by clearing the backlogs of cases at state courts. According to city data, as of March, more than 400 people have been held at Rikers without having been convicted of a crime. Some half dozen people have been there for more than six years.

                      “Too many people have been detained at Rikers, sometimes for years, while they wait for trial,” de Blasio said in a statement released to NYT. “For the first time, our city will work with the courts, law enforcement, district attorneys and the defense bar to immediately tackle case delays head-on and significantly reduce the average daily population on Rikers Island.”

                      The Mayor’s latest proposal attempts to target the much larger issue of court inefficiencies, namely “too few judges and court officers” and the lack of “enough interview rooms for lawyers to consult with clients.” Compounding these problems are missed court appointments, witness no-shows, scheduling conflicts and “overworked prosecutors and defense lawyers.”


                      Under de Blasio’s proposal, all cases where defendants have been held for over a year – more than 1,500 people – will be put on the court calendar within 45 days. Officials think plea deals, convictions and exonerations can resolve half of the cases within six months. Additionally, the city is introducing an online tracking tool to monitor cases to prevent backlogs.

                      “Speedy disposition of justice is just an incredibly important moral obligation for a state,” de Blasio told the Times. “These are pretrial; they are not guilty of anything.”

                      READ MORE: NYC hired Rikers officers with gang ties, psychological issues - report


                      The administration’s plan is the latest effort to curb the dysfunction at Rikers, one of the world’s largest jails, which can hold as many as 15,000 inmates. It has come under scrutiny over the past year because of safety and security problems.

                      The US Justice Department filed a lawsuit against the city over allegations of violent abuse of teenage inmates. City investigations found guards had smuggled in contraband and used excessive force. The city has also been sued by families of inmates who passed away at the prison – a schizophrenic inmate who died in an overheated cell, another who died after drinking corrosive disinfectant and another who was allegedly beaten to death by guards.

                      Read more
                      NYC jails register record-breaking use of force against inmates in 2014


                      In March, the mayor introduced a 14-point plan to reduce violence among inmates by limiting visitors, adding security cameras and separating rival gangs. Under his direction, the corrections department has stopped solitary confinement for inmates under 21 years of age and has created therapeutic programs for all inmates.

                      The mayor’s office said more than 700 acts of violence were reported this year, reported Reuters. Last year, 71 percent of the violent acts at the prison involved attacks between inmates.
                      http://i46.tinypic.com/152i8tt.jpg
                      NEVER FORGETTING OUR HERO'S

                      Comment


                      • Sounds promising! Thanks @unblindeacon

                        Comment


                        • I know they raised the starting pay, did they raise top pay as well ?
                          55.......

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by NYCpoorest View Post
                            I know they raised the starting pay, did they raise top pay as well ?
                            No. We are still without a contract.
                            http://i46.tinypic.com/152i8tt.jpg
                            NEVER FORGETTING OUR HERO'S

                            Comment


                            • NYS SCOA President response to NY Times


                              Hello,
                              My name is --- and I am the President of the New York State Supreme Court Officers Association. I represent over 2300 Court Officers, a majority of whom are stationed in New York City Supreme Courts. I appreciate the article you wrote in today’s edition regarding the plan to shrink Riker’s Island’s population. I did want to make a couple of comments about some of the facts. You are completely correct in stating that there are not enough Court Officers assigned to these courts. We continue to operate at tremendous staffing deficits, short by 2009 standards by 150 -200 officers. We are losing people at rates never seen before on our job to retirement and lateral moves to other civil service positions. Not only does this place us in even more danger but stunts the ability to staff courtrooms properly. This certainly slows the system down some but the onus lies on the Office of Court Administration, which fails to address serious safety concerns when raised, barely replenishes security personnel, and has ordered all courtrooms to be shuttered for the day by 4:30 PM to avoid the payment of overtime. All of these misjudgements compound to create the extremely slow pace of justice you detail in today’s piece.
                              Judge Lippman is portrayed as someone riding to the rescue of a damaged correctional facility, however, his policies bear some blame for the situation. His use of the Judicial Budget for the funding of his Civil Legal Services initiative has caused the cessation of all overtime, which has always been necessary for the more efficient operation of the criminal justice process. Additionally, he has parsed the system beyond recognition by creating specialty and boutique court parts. They stretch staffing even further diluting the resources necessary to ensure that the criminal justice system is administered effectively.
                              http://i46.tinypic.com/152i8tt.jpg
                              NEVER FORGETTING OUR HERO'S

                              Comment


                              • Update: took my medical today. Doctor cleared me but I was told that "there are no available appointments at the moment but they anticipate the next being early June". As always I am anxious for not having a solid date.

                                Comment

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