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  • Howdy

    Cleared for appointment from the 2009 list, rank mid 500's. With news of some hiring across NYS, heres hoping for an academy soon!

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    • Originally posted by Kabbage View Post
      Howdy

      Cleared for appointment from the 2009 list, rank mid 500's. With news of some hiring across NYS, heres hoping for an academy soon!

      Congrats and welcome to the club. Were you canvassed for NYC, Suffolk, or the 9th JD?
      Last edited by Cravan; 04-06-2012, 12:02 PM.

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      • Started NYC, received the letter asking if I wanted to be considered for Suffolk and I signed on for that.

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        • Originally posted by Cravan View Post
          Hey Todd,

          That is great news for that guy at your job. Three years is a long time, but I guess it was worth the wait. The reality is that these jobs have to hire eventually. People retire, get promoted, or leave for another job.

          The state is really hiring. NYS plans to have 17 Correctional Officer classes and at least 1 Parole Officer class this fiscal year. I was sent a letter asking if I am still interested in a Parole Officer position. I took that exam in 2008 and then, the freeze was imposed. Just like you've stated, "we just need to have faith."
          Me too, got a letter from parole. Do i have to inform my investigator that i am processing there also?

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          • Originally posted by Kabbage View Post
            Started NYC, received the letter asking if I wanted to be considered for Suffolk and I signed on for that.
            Cool; I assume you live on Long Island, if so, you have lucked out.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by sadsack View Post
              Me too, got a letter from parole. Do i have to inform my investigator that i am processing there also?
              I suppose so, but I assume that they are aware of every civil service exam we take. Remember, it is public record.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Cravan View Post
                I suppose so, but I assume that they are aware of every civil service exam we take. Remember, it is public record.
                When I met my BI he asked me if I had taken any other exams; I assume if you've taken any exams since then you should also call and give them the heads up.

                And yes, I do live in Suffolk so that would be great to be hired here.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Kabbage View Post
                  When I met my BI he asked me if I had taken any other exams; I assume if you've taken any exams since then you should also call and give them the heads up.

                  And yes, I do live in Suffolk so that would be great to be hired here.

                  I keep my investigator informed about everything. I would love to work on Long Island because I plan to move there once I get a job in law enforcement.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Cravan View Post
                    I keep my investigator informed about everything. I would love to work on Long Island because I plan to move there once I get a job in law enforcement.
                    How long do you have to be an officer before you can become an investigator? is it like nypd where you are appointed or is there an exam to get in?

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                    • Originally posted by sadsack View Post
                      How long do you have to be an officer before you can become an investigator? is it like nypd where you are appointed or is there an exam to get in?
                      I do not know how long. I do not believe there is an exam. There are exams to become sergeant and lieutenant.

                      Comment


                      • Investigators in the applicant investigation unit are appointed through a job posting and interview process. There are only a handful of positions in that unit.

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                        • Originally posted by sadsack View Post
                          Me too, got a letter from parole. Do i have to inform my investigator that i am processing there also?
                          Hey Sadsack,

                          Did you take the Parole Officer trainee or Parole Officer exam?

                          Comment


                          • Peeved Dems lose appetite for Andrew Cuomo's lunch


                            Monday, April 02, 2012

                            ALBANY — The cold war between Gov. Cuomo and state Senate Democrats has gotten even chillier after a “significant” number of them boycotted a lunch at the governor’s mansion last week.

                            More than one-quarter of the 25 Senate Dems were AWOL for the Thursday reception held in celebration of the legislative successes that culminated in the budget deal. Republicans and four breakaway independent Democrats were in attendance.

                            Team Cuomo was apparently so concerned over the snubs that it is said to have put calls out to the no-show senators to ask why they didn’t attend.

                            “It was very childish,” state Sen. Tony Avella (D-Queens) said of the call he received.

                            “I told them, ‘Why should I go? The governor’s people have been arrogant, they’re not helpful, and they don’t return people’s calls.’ There was silence.”

                            “It’s a shame because there should be better relations between the Senate Democratic conference and a governor from their own party,” Avella added.

                            State Sen. Ruben Diaz of the Bronx, who has derisively called Cuomo “emperor,” said he would have felt like a hypocrite had he gone because he opposes so many of the governor’s recent moves.

                            Other Dems offered a variety of reasons for their absence.

                            State Sen. Eric Adams of Brooklyn said he had returned home to his district the night before and couldn’t make it back in time for the noon event.

                            State Sen. Joe Addabbo of Queens opted to make calls to constituents instead.

                            And state Sen. Jose Serrano of the Bronx was at the Capitol, where he expected to meet with fellow Dems — even though his leadership team was at the mansion.

                            But several sources said those were just excuses, and anger at Cuomo was the real motivation.

                            Many Democrats in the Legislature, public worker unions, black and Latino constituents, and liberals both in New York and in the national blogosphere say they feel betrayed by Cuomo over his breaking of a promise for independent redistricting — and his “rightward tilt” on issues, like pension reform.

                            Some Senate Dems now say they don’t expect Cuomo’s help this fall as they try to reclaim the chamber’s majority. They say they’ll instead rely heavily on the backing of powerful labor unions and progressive groups.

                            Cuomo wouldn’t say on Friday whether he would campaign for the Senate Dems, but those close to him made it clear he has little respect for them.

                            “There is no (unified) conference; there are factions,” a Cuomo insider said. “Most voted for the budget (last week) and some are supportive. Some are corrupt or incompetent and have no business in elected office.”

                            Caught between an angry conference and a governor he needs to work with, Senate Democratic Minority Leader John Sampson of Brooklyn tried to downplay the tension. In a statement, he said an “overwhelming number” of his members attended Cuomo’s reception and voted for the budget.

                            Comment


                            • Gov gets a Tier 6, but not the one he wanted

                              By SHERRY HALBROOK

                              New York state has a new retirement Tier 6 that will affect employees hired on or after April 1, 2012. It’s not as harsh as the governor proposed, but it’s still a step down from Tier 5.

                              In the predawn hours of March 15, votes on Tier 6 were cast and counted. In the Senate, all but one of the Democratic caucus walked out before the vote on Tier 6, and the one who remained voted no, along with the four independent Democrats.

                              Both parties were split over the issue in the Assembly, with 92 voting yes and 46 voting no. The leaders of both parties voted for the new tier after filing down its sharpest edges.

                              PEF and other state employee unions and retiree organizations opposed the pension tier as unnecessary, unfair and unwise.

                              It will be years before anyone retires under Tier 6, so it will not significantly affect the budget now.

                              Rising pension-contribution costs for the state and local governments are the direct result of the Wall Street and banking crisis that sucked billions of dollars out of the pension fund. PEF is supporting legislation to allow the state attorney general to sue to recover some of the pension fund losses.

                              Before the crisis, high return on pension fund investments had allowed the state and local governments to contribute very little to the pension fund. As the economy recovers, fund investment income will again rise and the need for contributions will diminish.

                              Tier 6 for managers

                              As revised, Tier 6 has two options for managers and other employees not represented by unions and a single option for everyone else.

                              Only non-bargaining-unit employees may opt for the “defined-contribution option” of a 401k-style investment fund that Cuomo proposed. Or they may choose a defined-benefit option similar to that offered to unionized employees.

                              Tier 6 for PS&T members
                              Employees will be vested in Tier 6 after 10 years.

                              Employee contributions will vary by salary level:
                              If you earn up to $45,000 annually, you will contribute 3 percent of your salary; if you earn $45,001-$55,000, you will contribute 3.5 percent; those earning $55,001-$75,000 will contribute 4.5 percent; those who earn $75,001-$100,000 will contribute 5.75 percent; and those earning $100,001 or more will contribute 6 percent.

                              The governor’s proposal for employees to contribute more if the employer’s contribution went above 7 percent was dropped.

                              Employees may retire without penalty at age 63 and older. Pensions will be reduced 6.5 percent for each year below age 63.

                              Pension benefits are a percentage of the employee’s “final average salary (FAS),” which will be based on their highest five consecutive years. No single year’s salary may increase by more than 10 percent over the average of the prior four years. And the FAS may not exceed the governor’s salary, that’s currently $179,000. All vacation payout, or other lump sum paid at retirement is excluded from the FAS. Up to $15,000 in overtime pay, indexed for inflation, may be included in the FAS. Pension service credit may be given for up to 100 days of unused sick leave.

                              Those who retire with 10-19 years of service would receive 1.67 percent of their FAS for each year of service. Those who retire with 20 or more years of service would receive 1.75 percent of their FAS for the first 20 years plus 2 percent of FAS for every additional year of service.

                              Comment


                              • Thats not thatbad. Make sure we all enroll upon hire when your salary is the lowest so you will pay 3 percent. We loose cause we have to stay longer and payout is not as high as tier before. we kept the same 10 year vesting option which is good. Overall not to bad for union employee's I feel. Now just to get in before they add a tier 7.

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