Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

NYS Court Officers

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • sorry was being sarcastic

    Comment


    • Cuomo Signs New Pension Deal Into Law


      Governor Andrew Cuomo put his executive pen to paper Thursday on a new state pension reform deal.

      Cuomo signed the legislation surrounded by mayors and county executives from around the state.

      The deal for pension reform was reached in marathon sessions of the legislature late Wednesday night into early Thursday morning.

      It creates a new Tier VI in the state pension plan, requires new hires to contribute more to their plans, and raises the retirement age from 62 to 63.

      There will now be a 401k-like account for high-earning, non-union new workers. Cuomo had wanted that option for all new state workers.

      Nevertheless, the governor said the pension reform will save state and local governments $80 billion over 30 years.

      Cuomo thanked local officials — particularly Mayor Michael Bloomberg — for helping push for the deal.

      "It's not overly dramatic to say that if this pension costs were to continue today, you would see cities and towns across this state going bankrupt, period," Cuomo said.

      Bloomberg spearheaded a coalition of local elected officials that produced TV ads and urged legislators to vote for the reform.

      "If the governor got everything he asked for, he wasn't asking for enough," Bloomberg said. "I think history is going to show not only is this enough, it's time that we sit back and take a quick victory lap and then get back to work because we still have an awful lot more to do for this state."

      The mayor adds the deal will save the city roughly $21 billion without affecting current public employees.

      Unions were pushing back against pension reform through wee hours early Thursday morning when the State Assembly finally passed the bill. The union leaders have vowed to keep fighting.

      "It should not be the workers whose backs this legislation is going to be on, as a scapegoat for activities and the transfer of people's monies to Wall Street from people's income and security," said Wanda Williams of District Council 37.

      Police and fire are exempt from Tier VI, but New York City is different since its police and firefighters have a whole different tier system. The new pension reform law extends reduced benefits to sanitation workers and corrections.

      Comment


      • Results of Physical Ability Test - Taken February 29, 2012 is posted on the OCA's website below.

        http://www.nycourts.gov/careers/cot/index.shtml

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Cravan View Post
          Hey,

          Congrats on passing your pre-screening medical exam. Are you being canvassed for NYC and what is your score on the exam?

          The link below lists all phases of the screening process:

          http://www.nycourts.gov/careers/cot/screening.shtml
          I'm being canvassed for suffolk county. I actually forgot my score but my rank is around 14xx. I took the physical ability test today, I'm pretty sure I did well on it but I don't know what the minimum passing scores are.

          I was also given a large checklist of items for the background investigation so hopefully they will start recruiting new classes soon.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by ryu991 View Post
            I'm being canvassed for suffolk county. I actually forgot my score but my rank is around 14xx. I took the physical ability test today, I'm pretty sure I did well on it but I don't know what the minimum passing scores are.

            I was also given a large checklist of items for the background investigation so hopefully they will start recruiting new classes soon.
            I hope you passed the physical. I am not sure what the minimum passing scores are. I do know that the OCA adds up all parts of the physical cumulatively.

            How many potential recruits were at the physical? Furthermore, did the OCA tell you anything about a future recruit class during the physical?

            Anyhow, it is good to see that the OCA is still processing people.

            Good luck

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Cravan View Post
              I hope you passed the physical. I am not sure what the minimum passing scores are. I do know that the OCA adds up all parts of the physical cumulatively.

              How many potential recruits were at the physical? Furthermore, did the OCA tell you anything about a future recruit class during the physical?

              Anyhow, it is good to see that the OCA is still processing people.

              Good luck
              I definitely feel good about my PAT results but I guess I'll find out for sure on April 9th.

              There were about 25 people there taking the test for the first time as well as a small handful of people taking their retest(I saw about 3 but there may have been more)

              They did not say anything for sure about the next class, they did mention that they are hoping that the budget situation is fixed and also that if there is a new class there will not necessarily be a lot of notice.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by ryu991 View Post
                I definitely feel good about my PAT results but I guess I'll find out for sure on April 9th.

                There were about 25 people there taking the test for the first time as well as a small handful of people taking their retest(I saw about 3 but there may have been more)

                They did not say anything for sure about the next class, they did mention that they are hoping that the budget situation is fixed and also that if there is a new class there will not necessarily be a lot of notice.
                Thanks for the information. Were most of the 25 potential recruits also being canvassed for Suffolk?

                Comment


                • Cuomo Touts Second On-Time Budget Agreement

                  Governor Andrew Cuomo announced Tuesday evening that state lawmakers in Albany have reached an agreement for an on-time budget for the second year in a row.

                  The $132.5 billion budget for 2012-2013, which was due by April 1, increases spending by 1.9 percent and creates a new panel to streamline big construction projects.

                  Notoriously late budgets had come to define Albany, a culture the governor vowed to change. Cuomo credited his staff and a good working relationship with the state Legislature for New york being on pace to pass its second on time budget in as many years.

                  "Congratulations to all of you. I know it was a long road and a long haul. And I know we are not there yet, they still have to vote, but it's been a really great job," the governor said.

                  Cuomo said the deal with Democratic State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and Republican Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos expands economic development and jobs programs in addition to providing protections for poor New Yorkers and immigrants.

                  The governor said the budget does not include any new taxes or fees.

                  "It is a very honest, straightforward document that exhibits the fiscal discipline and fiscal integrity that we've been talking about," Cuomo said. "It also evidences the priorities we've been talking about: It's all about jobs, jobs, jobs."

                  In effect, the Legislature last year already agreed to raise taxes on the wealthiest New Yorkers. The so-called millionaire's tax was supposed to end last year but a new tax rate on the state's wealthiest residents was pushed through by the governor.

                  Cuomo also touted a plan to streamline big construction projects, as now 45 agencies have to approve them. The so-called New York Works Task Force will slim down the approval project.

                  School aid is increasing in both competitive grants and based on established formulas.

                  It also solidifies the changes in retirement plans for future state workers. That led Mayor Michael Bloomberg to praise the plan, while public sector unions panned it.

                  In addition, SUNY and CUNY community colleges will see a $31 billion increase.

                  "Significant increases for the first time in five years, because we believe in bad economic times people go to community colleges to build their skills, get jobs or get better jobs," said Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver.

                  Other highlights in the budget include infrastructure investment. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority will get its full state funding of $770 million for projects like the Second Avenue subway, the Fulton Transit Center and expansion of the 7 line.

                  Some of the most contentious issues in this budget were actually dealt with weeks ago. A deal was reached for new teacher evaluations and legislators voted on a controversial pension reform plan earlier this month.

                  When Cuomo was asked to compare last year's process to this year's, he said "This year, in some ways, the degree of difficulty went up by our own ambition. We laid forth a very ambitious agenda in the State Of The State [Address] and the budget. Because the state needed it."

                  Not in this year's budget is money for a health care exchange. New York must set one up to comply with federal law but there was no agreement. The governor has confirmed that he will set it up via executive order, likely this week.

                  State lawmakers will begin voting on the individual budget bills Wednesday.

                  Comment


                  • Does anyone have an idea of when the next time they will be having a court officer exam open?

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by The hopeful View Post
                      Does anyone have an idea of when the next time they will be having a court officer exam open?
                      Possibly in October & December 2013.

                      Comment


                      • GOSHEN — An Orange County grand jury has found that two court officers were justified when they fatally shot a gunman who had fired at them as he entered the Middletown City Court security checkpoint on Feb. 8.

                        Timothy Mulqueen of Middletown approached the court entrance from a hallway attached to City Hall. As the court officers spotted him, Mulqueen brandished a shotgun and fired two shots rounds through the glass entry door.

                        In response, Officer Michael Mathisen and Sgt. Robert Kowal fired a total of seven shots, four of which hit Mulqueen.

                        Two other court officers cleared members of the public out of the security vestibule and cleared the courtroom, and Middletown police responded to back up the court officers.
                        Mulqueen died at the scene.

                        District Attorney Frank Phillips said Mulqueen was carrying 40 rounds of ammunition.
                        It’s standard policy for Phillips’ office to submit all officer-involved shootings to a grand jury for review.

                        Phillips commended the officers, saying their actions doubtless saved people from injury or death.

                        Comment


                        • Does anybody know if a history of a sports hernia is enough to dq someone medically from the job?

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Walo View Post
                            Not to sound like a jerk, but if someone is going to wait 5 years for a job, a little more incentive than "you'll see how good it is once (if) you get in" would be nice.
                            Cant spill all the beans...........just get through the academy when the time comes and once you get to your command remember my words!

                            Comment


                            • Albany Lawmakers Approve Final Budget Bills On Time


                              Members of the New York State Senate and Assembly voted today on final budget bills, marking the second year in a row a budget has been delivered to Governor Cuomo's desk before the April 1 deadline.

                              The spending plan totals $132.6 billion dollars.

                              Spending in the Empire State will go up by 1.9 percent, just under the two percent cap.

                              Speaking to reporters at the capitol, Governor Andrew Cuomo placed great emphasis on the successes in education reform, specifically mentioning the deal on state teacher evaluations, which is part of his budget.

                              "It truly is an example of fiscal discipline and fiscal integrity. Spending actually goes down from last year overall and the state spending level is within the 2 percent," Cuomo said.

                              New York City will be getting nearly $8 billion in school aid, a $75 million increase from what the governor originally proposed.

                              Governor Cuomo also called the complete budget a reform plan and major transformation for the state government.

                              "In this agreement, I am pleased to say that we keep that promise to increase our investment in public education, the cornerstone of our economy," said Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver.

                              The budget also contains funding to keep the Kingsboro Psychiatric Center in Brooklyn open, though no long term solution is in place.

                              Legislation for some major budget items, including redistricting and pension reform, were passed a couple of weeks ago.

                              Comment


                              • New York Passes 2nd Straight On-Time Budget

                                ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — They did it again.

                                New York’s Senate and Assembly passed the state’s second straight on-time budget.

                                The $132.5 billion budget was negotiated by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the Senate Republican and Assembly’s Democratic majorities. It increases spending by 1.9 percent and addresses a nearly $2 billion deficit.

                                The budget was due by midnight Saturday and will guide state operations through the 20102-13 fiscal year.

                                The legislation includes a 4 percent increase for schools and for the Medicaid healthcare system.

                                One of Cuomo’s wins is the $16 billion “New York Works” program intended to create jobs and repair infrastructure.

                                Comment

                                MR300x250 Tablet

                                Collapse

                                What's Going On

                                Collapse

                                There are currently 13045 users online. 492 members and 12553 guests.

                                Most users ever online was 19,482 at 12:44 PM on 09-29-2011.

                                Welcome Ad

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X