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  • At this point, no one knows what is going to happen. We have to wait until the budget is passed to see if further details about a recruit class will emerge.

    The next exam is in late 2013.

    Comment


    • Woman shot dead outside courthouse


      At least one person was shot dead by a man outside a county courthouse in Beaumont, Texas, local media reported Wednesday.

      An elderly woman was killed and at least three others were shot, including two rushed to the hospital with several gunshot wounds, KFDM TV reported.

      The shootings took place outside the courthouse, in the basement of the county clerk's office and at a bus station.

      The suspect reportedly surrendered to police after having holed up in a building two blocks from the courthouse.

      A judge told KBMT TV that the suspect is a man facing charges of having sexually assaulted his young daughter, who reportedly is mentally handicapped. He had been expected at a hearing Wednesday afternoon, the judge said.

      The Beaumont Enterprise said the judge identified the shooter as Bartholomew Granger, 41.

      The shooting follows one at a county courthouse in Washington state last Friday in which a man shot a sheriff's deputy and attacked a judge.

      Two days before that a gunman fired shots into the air and then traded gunfire with police outside the county courthouse in Tulsa, Okla., wounding a sheriff's deputy and a bystander.

      Comment


      • Wake up OCA and hire more officers!!! It is getting serious out here.

        Comment


        • Gov. Cuomo and Legislature make deals on pension reform, gambling and redistricting


          ALBANY — Gov. Cuomo and the Legislature on Wednesday nailed down a slew of deals to cap a chaotic day.

          The agreements were expected to include hard-fought changes to the pension system, a move toward legalizing casinos, an expansion of the state’s DNA data bank and a new system for drawing legislative lines every decade.

          “The governor delivered in a major way,” said one city official. “It’s almost hard to believe this kind of broad-based reform is happening.”

          The pension and redistricting deals were the hardest to reach — and the most controversial.

          Unions called the pension agreement an attack on the working class, while fiscal hawks outside the Legislature griped it didn’t go far enough.

          The final deal is projected by Team Cuomo to save state and local governments $80 billion over three decades, down from $113 billion in his original plan.

          It is said to include a scaled-back version of Cuomo’s push for a 401(k)-style option that now would affect only new, non-union, “higher income” earners, like agency commissioners.

          It leaves in place the 10-year period before a worker would be eligible for benefits. Cuomo wanted to bump it to 12 years.

          The deal increases the current retirement age to 63, up from 62. And it would hike the 3% employee contribution rate to as much as 6% for new hires.

          As the Daily News first reported Wednesday, the NYPD and FDNY would be exempt from the reforms — but payouts would be based on the final five years of salary, up from the current three years.

          The plan is said to preserve for the city $21 billion of the $30 billion in savings from Cuomo’s original proposal.

          While EJ McMahon, of the Empire Center for New York State Policy, agreed the city comes off better, he decried the overall pension changes as “marginal tweaks.”

          “Once again, it seems we’re more about the deal than the substance,” McMahon said. “It’s more about saying there’s change than actually delivering it.

          Meanwhile, a key union for government workers immediately announced two radio ads slamming Cuomo for siding with Wall Street over teachers, nurses and minority communities.

          Under the other deals:

          The Legislature took the first step toward a constitutional amendment legalizing up to seven casinos in the state. Future legislation will spell out where they would go.

          New York’s DNA data bank would require anyone convicted of a felony or misdemeanor to provide a DNA sample.

          Despite fierce opposition from black and Hispanic legislators, state leaders agreed on a redistricting plan that will implement new state legislative lines for this year — but also seek to reform the process for the future.

          Critics charge that the changes still leave the process in the hands of the Legislature. Cuomo aides say provisions limit that power.

          “So much for change coming to Albany,” said state Sen. Michael Gianaris (D-Queens). “The bad guys won.”

          Comment


          • It is said to include a scaled-back version of Cuomo’s push for a 401(k)-style option that now would affect only new, non-union, “higher income” earners, like agency commissioners.

            It leaves in place the 10-year period before a worker would be eligible for benefits. Cuomo wanted to bump it to 12 years.

            The deal increases the current retirement age to 63, up from 62. And it would hike the 3% employee contribution rate to as much as 6% for new hires.


            So the only significant change is the 3-6% now?It makes a difference but better than what was being proposed. Anyone have more info?

            Comment


            • Originally posted by CivilServant14 View Post
              It is said to include a scaled-back version of Cuomo’s push for a 401(k)-style option that now would affect only new, non-union, “higher income” earners, like agency commissioners.

              It leaves in place the 10-year period before a worker would be eligible for benefits. Cuomo wanted to bump it to 12 years.

              The deal increases the current retirement age to 63, up from 62. And it would hike the 3% employee contribution rate to as much as 6% for new hires.


              So the only significant change is the 3-6% now?It makes a difference but better than what was being proposed. Anyone have more info?
              It seems like Cuomo folded under pressure. He probably remembered that he has to get re-elected.

              I do not like any of the changes, but it is much better than what was proposed earlier this year.

              There is a divide and conquer type feel to this reform (i.e. NYPD & FDNY will not be affected by this proposal). I wonder if NYC Corrections will also not be affected by this reform. In my opinion it makes other government workers who are affected feel less important.

              Lastly, it is a waste of time to increase the retirement age from 62 to 63. I'll let you all know one thing, I will never vote for Cuomo again.

              Cravan

              Comment


              • Marathon Session In Albany Yields Pension Deal

                State lawmakers signed off early this morning on a major pension reform deal after a day of back room dealing led to agreements on several of Governor Andrew Cuomo's priorities.

                Following a marathon session that stretched into the early morning hours Thursday, the State Assembly passed the pension deal that had already been approved by the State Senate.

                It creates a new tier six in the state pension plan.

                The biggest changes include requiring new hires to contribute more to their pensions as well as raising the retirement age from 62 to 63.

                Governor Cuomo says it will save state and local governments, including the city, $80 billion over 30 years.

                The Senate and Assembly signed off on new lines for their districts.

                They also agreed change the redistricting process after the next U.S. Census.

                Both chambers also agreed on a constitutional amendment to legalize casino gambling.

                The deal could bring as many as seven new casinos to the state.

                And lawmakers in both houses voted to expand the state's DNA database to require anyone convicted of a crime to submit a sample.

                Comment


                • Bloomberg, Cuomo praise New York State pension reforms

                  http://www.silive.com/news/index.ssf...e_pension.html


                  The above link lists all the specifics on pension reform.

                  Comment


                  • Pension Reform Deal Draws Praise From Bloomberg And Cuomo, Anger From Unions


                    Albany’s “Night of the Living Deals” included the passage of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s pension reform plan for public employees. Both the governor and Mayor Michael Bloomberg, perhaps the most high profile supporter of Tier VI, released statements praising the passage of the proposal.

                    “This bold and transformational pension reform plan is a historic win for New York taxpayers and municipalities that will save more than $80 billion over the next 30 years, while preserving retirement security for public workers. Without this critical reform, New Yorkers would have seen significant tax increases, as well as layoffs to teachers, firefighters and police,” Mr. Cuomo said.

                    Mayor Bloomberg, who led a public push for the plan in the past week, praised Governor Cuomo and the leaders of the Legislature for passing pension reform. The Republican-controlled State Senate included pension reform in their budget, but prior to last night, the Assembly did not.

                    “Governor Cuomo has shown extraordinary resolve and deserves an enormous amount of credit for taking on this challenge. Senate Majority Leader Skelos, Assembly Speaker Silver and Assembly Minority Leader Kolb also deserve real credit for stepping up and meeting the challenge. This agreement – which many predicted would never happen – will provide long-term savings that will allow New York City and State to invest in our future and ensure that our best days are still ahead,” Mr. Bloomberg said.

                    The new Tier VI pensions will not affect existing public employees. For new workers, the plan will result in the retirement age being raised to 63, some increased pension contributions, limits in the number of sick and leave days that can be counted toward retirement service credit and adjustments to the pension multiplier and final average salary calculation. Tier VI also limits the number of different jobs that can be counted toward a pension to two and includes a 401(k) type option. Workers who make more than the $179,000 the governor earns will not be able to count the portion of their salary above that amount toward their pension. All of these changes are designed to stop rapidly growing pension fund costs.

                    Unions have vigorously opposed the governor’s pension reform proposal. CSEA President Danny Donohue, who’s currently mounting a campaign to lead the New York chapter of AFSCME, released a statement of his own blasting the pension reform agreement.

                    “Tier 6 shoved down the throat of state legislators fixated on their own self-preservation, will be devastating to 99 percent of New Yorkers,” Mr. Donohue said. “This deal is about politicians standing with the 1 percent – the wealthiest New Yorkers – to give them a better break while telling nurses, bus drivers, teachers, secretaries, and laborers to put up and shut up.”

                    Comment


                    • Court Officers Acted Properly in Middletown Shooting, Observers Say


                      Andrew Keshner

                      New York Law Journal

                      02-10-2012

                      Four court officers involved in the killing of a man who fired a shotgun in the vestibule outside the Middletown City Court acted appropriately and with restraint, according to a court official and union representatives.

                      Court officers on Feb. 8 fatally shot Timothy Mulqueen, a 43-year-old Middletown man with a reported history of mental illness, as he stormed the courthouse firing a 12-gauge shotgun. One officer suffered a graze wound in the attack.

                      The officers were "trained to do exactly as they did," said John Strandberg, president of the New York State Supreme Court Officers Association, whose union represents the four officers.

                      Likewise, Office of Court Administration spokesman David Bookstaver said court officers' training "covers every aspect of the job, including firearm training, when to use it, when not to and escalation of force. It goes without saying that every bit of that training came into play and paid huge dividends."

                      The incident has not prompted review of security standards within the state's courts, Mr. Bookstaver said, because standards are already deemed sufficient.

                      Mr. Bookstaver noted that the Orange County district attorney is conducting its own investigation, and that "in the future [OCA] will certainly do a review of the entire incident."

                      The Middletown City Court remained closed on Feb. 9 to accommodate repairs and replacements of the metal detector and X-ray machine, which were damaged in the incident.

                      The court is expected to reopen on Feb. 10, Mr. Bookstaver said.

                      The four court officers involved in the shooting were Sergeant Robert Kowal, 59; Officer Michael Mathisen, 42; Officer Scott Truex, 38; and Officer Michele Lynch, 47. Sergeant Kowal, Officer Mathisen and Officer Truex were hired in 1999; Officer Lynch in 1994.

                      Efforts to reach the officers were unsuccessful.

                      Mr. Bookstaver declined to identify which of the officers returned fire but said all are taking an indeterminate amount of vacation time.

                      Officer Strandberg said the four officers' positions at the court would be backfilled by other officers stationed in the Ninth Judicial District, as would be the case if the officers were absent due to training or vacation.

                      In the aftermath of the shooting, Officer Strandberg said the four officers, whom he said had "exemplary service records," could avail themselves of counseling if they wanted it. The union would also provide attorneys to represent them in any investigation, he said.

                      No court statistics were available to gauge the number of times officers have discharged firearms but Mr. Bookstaver said it was "very rare," adding he could not recall an incident when an officer needed to open fire in the line of duty.

                      Court officers are trained in the use of firearms and deadly force. For example, court officer candidates are trained to understand Article 35 of the Penal Law, which covers the use of force and deadly force, said Officer Strandberg.

                      Dennis Quirk, president of the New York Court Officers Association, who also said the Middletown court officers acted properly, noted that officers' training includes 14 days of firearm use, which includes computer simulation. Once hired, court officers are also mandated, like police officers, to devote one full day a year of in-service training at a gun range.

                      Though the Feb. 8 shooting might be a rare occurrence, it is common for officers to be physically harmed in the line of duty as they keep order in the courts.

                      "Physical altercations happen day in and day out," said Mr. Quirk, noting that the same day as the Middletown shooting, four officers were hurt in Bronx Family Court in an altercation but he did not know the extent of their injuries.

                      "The bottom line is, on a daily basis, court officers put themselves in harm's way," said Officer Strandberg, noting that in the past month, he has heard of officers breaking wrists, dislocating shoulders and tearing knee ligaments when containing defendant outbursts or taking people into custody.

                      Officer Strandberg, who is stationed in Brooklyn Supreme Court, said he too had been injured in the line of duty but declined to elaborate.

                      Examining Procedures

                      The Civil Service Employees Association for the southern region of New York said it planned to send a health and safety specialist to the Middletown court to talk with its 17 members about whether procedures were followed.

                      Jessica Ladlee, a spokeswoman for the civil service union, said the specialist would try to determine whether there was compliance with the state's Workplace Violence Protection Act.

                      "It sounds like everybody did their job. It's a good example where greater harm was prevented," she said.

                      In light of the shooting, Orange County Bar Association president John S. Selinger, of Zeccola Selinger in Goshen, said the group is forming a committee to talk with judges and practicing attorneys in the county's village, town and city courts to evaluate security at those locations.

                      Gunman's History

                      In August 2011, Mr. Mulqueen was arrested on charges of menacing, harassment and trespass after showing up at the house of Middletown Mayor Joseph M. DeStefano and encountering the mayor's daughter.

                      On Feb. 1, Mr. Mulqueen was convicted and fined, with an order of protection signed against him.

                      It was reported that Mr. Mulqueen harbored a grudge against Mr. DeStefano. But Edward Bruno, a solo practitioner in Pine Bush who represented Mr. Mulqueen in the harassment case, said in an interview if there was a grudge, he was not aware of its nature.

                      Mr. Bruno said he was "shocked" to learn his former client was the gunman.

                      Having known Mr. Mulqueen for 20 years, though falling out of touch before taking up his representation, Mr. Bruno said Mr. Mulqueen was "not a violent person" who exhibited no physically violent tendencies during his representation.

                      On the other hand, Mr. Bruno said Mr. Mulqueen showed "pretty extreme paranoia," for example, thinking local police and the FBI were watching him.

                      Mr. Bruno recalled that Mr. Mulqueen's last words were essentially saying he had no plans of going near Mr. DeStefano.

                      The Orange County District Attorney's Office did not return a call for comment.

                      Comment


                      • All I want to know is how this new pension reform will affect someone like me. Does that mean that I have to work until I'm 63 before i can collect a full pension ? If i get hired in the distant future would that mean Ii would have to work almost 40 years to collect. I dont know, doesnt make this as attractive as it once was, even if it means weekends and holidays off.

                        Comment


                        • With all these great savings from pension reform maybe they can start hiring again.

                          Comment


                          • I re-read these new pension reforms and in my opinion it is horrible. It is more beneficial to join the NYPD & FDNY if you are not over the age limit.

                            To all my fellow Jan 6, 2011 academy recruits, we got screwed again courtesy of Cuomo.

                            Both NYS and NYC will not immediately benefit from the pension reform savings because it only applies to new hires. The savings will come thirty years from now.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by sadsack View Post
                              All I want to know is how this new pension reform will affect someone like me. Does that mean that I have to work until I'm 63 before i can collect a full pension ? If i get hired in the distant future would that mean Ii would have to work almost 40 years to collect. I dont know, doesnt make this as attractive as it once was, even if it means weekends and holidays off.

                              I think court officers may still fall under the 30/55 deal because they are uniformed peace officers. Can someone please verify this?

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by isler45 View Post
                                With all these great savings from pension reform maybe they can start hiring again.
                                what savings?

                                Comment

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