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  • That's a regular rumor every year. Buyouts have to instituted by the statem usually as part of the budget process. Each branch of government and the various agencies can decide whether or not they want to participate.

    Comment


    • I have heard the guys talking about a buyout in my command everyday since I got there lol. IF another buyout took place we'd loose A captain 2 LT's and at least 12 SCO's. This is in addition to being 20+ lines short, which isn't as short as some other commands. Right now its only rumor and wishful thinking. Also I think we are starting contract negotiations next week and my delegate has said both unions will be pushing new hiring. Believe me when I tell you we ALL want to see you guys get on. So we'll see what happens. I was hoping to hear about an academy by now but so far only rumor and speculation.
      http://i46.tinypic.com/152i8tt.jpg
      NEVER FORGETTING OUR HERO'S

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      • Thanks for clearing up the rumors guys. I hope the empty lines are filled asap. I sent you a pm Unblindeacon.

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        • Cravan check your inbox
          http://i46.tinypic.com/152i8tt.jpg
          NEVER FORGETTING OUR HERO'S

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          • Originally posted by unblindeacon View Post
            Cravan check your inbox
            I just did. Thank you very much. Oh yeah, I saw some of your posts when you were not on the job. You were right, you were just like me, asking many questions about the job. Lol. I will have to look out for new comers too once I get on the job.

            Comment


            • Governor, State Workers' Union Reach Tentative Contract Agreement

              By: NY1 News

              A tentative agreement reached on Sunday between the New York State Public Employees Federation and Governor Andrew Cuomo, if it is approved by the union's board on Monday, is expected to avoid 3,496 layoffs.

              PEF officials said the agreement for a new four-year contract will be presented to the union's executive board on Monday.

              The new contract includes a three-year wage freeze, nine furlough days and increased health insurance costs -- which are all similar terms to another contract voted down by the PEF last month.

              However, the new agreement lets union members use vacation time to offset health insurance costs.

              The new deal, if it is approved by the PEF, takes affect on November 4.

              Governor Andrew Cuomo and the union had been working to reach a deal before Wednesday, which is when the proposed layoffs were supposed to go into effect.

              PEF is the state's second-largest state employee union, representing about 55,000 professional, scientific and technical employees.

              About 10,600 members are in New York City, and they include workers in the state tax, finance, transportation, insurance and environmental conservation departments, and nurses in psychiatric centers.

              Comment


              • Any chance they get down to 85 within the life of this list? Certainly doesnt fell like it at this point.

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                • Originally posted by path5 View Post
                  Any chance they get down to 85 within the life of this list? Certainly doesnt fell like it at this point.
                  You never know. Stay positive.

                  Comment


                  • 9th Jd questions

                    I currently reside in the Albany area and selected the JD's in this area as my preference. As everyone know, there is a hiring freeze except downstate.

                    The question I have is, is it feasible for an applicant to apply to the 9th JD. I know that would be a long daily commute, but I also feel like it would get me started in the hiring process. Do other CO's have commute's like this? Is it possible to transfer back upstate eventually? My rank is in the 400's, I've already been passed. Hopefully I can still change JD's??

                    Thanks!

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by grunt999 View Post
                      I currently reside in the Albany area and selected the JD's in this area as my preference. As everyone know, there is a hiring freeze except downstate.

                      The question I have is, is it feasible for an applicant to apply to the 9th JD. I know that would be a long daily commute, but I also feel like it would get me started in the hiring process. Do other CO's have commute's like this? Is it possible to transfer back upstate eventually? My rank is in the 400's, I've already been passed. Hopefully I can still change JD's??

                      Thanks!
                      Hey,

                      Did OCA tell you that there is a hiring freeze upstate? If so, I would encourage you to travel to the 9th JD to work as a Court Officer. You can always transfer, but I am not sure how long it is going to take you to get one. You should call OCA to see if you can change JD's. By the way, are you finished with the screening process?

                      Good luck
                      Last edited by Cravan; 10-21-2011, 11:53 PM.

                      Comment


                      • Pfau to Resign as N.Y. Courts' Top Administrator




                        Chief Administrative Judge Ann T. Pfau, who has managed the New York State court system through 4½ exceptionally tumultuous years, yesterday informed colleagues that she will step down on Dec. 1 to take over a new medical malpractice program and try cases in her home borough of Brooklyn.

                        She announced her plans in a conference call with the state's administrative judges. A successor was not immediately named.

                        Judge Pfau's tenure coincided with rancorous and often bitter controversy over judicial salaries, early retirements, layoffs and budget cuts.

                        Yet the first woman to hold the highly stressful and often thankless job said in an interview that she "wake[s] up every day thinking I am the luckiest person in the world to have this job."

                        "This is the career of a lifetime," Judge Pfau said. "But there comes a time when you need to do something else. I want to be a judge."

                        Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman said Judge Pfau (See Profile) approached him several months ago expressing a desire to move to a new assignment, but agreed to remain in the position through the resolution of the judicial pay dispute and the submission of the next budget, which is due Dec. 1, the day she departs.

                        "She has been a great leader and is someone who has, by any standard, gone through the wars and come out as a strong, effective and inspiring leader for the troops," Judge Lippman said. "This is someone who has really paid her dues and at this point she deserves whatever she wants to do. I am delighted to make that happen."

                        The chief judge said he will appoint a new chief administrative judge within a matter of days, but declined to identify his choice.

                        Judge Lippman said he is reassigning Judge Pfau to the position of coordinating judge of the New York State Medical Malpractice Program.

                        In that position, Judge Pfau will administer a federal grant and oversee a program that promotes early settlement of medical negligence cases through judge-directed negotiation. She will be working with Bronx Supreme Court Justice Douglas McKeon (See Profile), who initiated the pilot program.

                        Judge Pfau, who has maintained a regular commercial caseload during her years as an administrative judge, will preside over medical malpractice matters in Brooklyn in addition to her coordinating role.

                        As chief administrative judge, Judge Pfau earns $147,600 a year. Her new salary has not yet been determined, Judge Lippman said.

                        Under the state Constitution (Article VI, §28), the chief administrative judge supervises the daily operation and administration of a court system that handles 4.7 million cases a year, overseeing a $2.5 billion budget, 3,600 state and local judges and 15,000 judicial employees spread over 300 different locations.

                        The position is inherently stressful, demanding a deft blend of political and organizational skills.

                        Except for Judge Lippman, who held the position for nearly 12 years before Judge Pfau's appointment in mid-2007 by Chief Judge Judith S. Kaye, no one has celebrated a fifth anniversary in the job, and no one other than Judge Pfau had extended service under more than one chief judge.

                        Judge Pfau's time as chief administrator coincided with an unusually difficult era for the courts.

                        Judges were infuriated that the Legislature had denied them pay raises for a dozen years. About 1,500 employees took early retirement last fall, and half the positions were never filled because of an impending fiscal crisis. The court system voluntarily cut $100 million from its budget request in a gesture of cooperation with the political branches—and then watched powerlessly as Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the Legislature cut another $70 million. Consequently, nearly 500 employees lost their job.

                        "This has been a very, very difficult year with the fiscal and operational challenges," Judge Pfau acknowledged. "I couldn't be luckier than to be surrounded by such wonderful administrative judges who make the system work. I love the job and I adore the people, but you get to the point where you say to yourself, 'Can I do this for another year with a totally full heart and every bit of my energy?'"

                        CALM AND FOCUSED

                        Despite the struggles and setbacks that were beyond her control, Judge Pfau presided over the largest expansion of electronic filing in state history, guided the court system's response to the mortgage foreclosure crisis, overhauled the guardianship and fiduciary appointment system and focused attention on Family Court.

                        "I will miss her sterling leadership, her management skills and her ability to have the kind of dialogue with our judges and the other branches of government that gets things done," Judge Lippman said.

                        Case in point: At the judicial budget hearing earlier this year, Judge Pfau appeared before an angry and combative legislative committee that was clearly spoiling for a fight and portraying the judiciary as spendthrift and indifferent to the state's fiscal woes.

                        But Judge Pfau calmly diffused their anger, responding firmly and confidently to the acerbic questions and caustic comments.

                        "She's a trouper and she's a pro, and she does it with grace and dignity," Judge Lippman said. "That's why I have always given her the toughest assignments."

                        For the judiciary, the greatest achievement of Judge Pfau's tenure was passage of legislation creating a Special Commission on Judicial Compensation. The commission ensures that judicial salaries are objectively reviewed and adjusted at regular intervals.

                        Although many judges were disappointed with the result—a 27 percent pay raise over three years—they are relieved to finally see a pay raise, and more relieved that the new process should largely remove judicial compensation from politics.

                        "We can't guarantee the outcome will always be what people want, but at least there is a procedure," Judge Pfau said. "I was committed to staying through that process and promised [Judge Lippman] that I would do that."

                        Judge Pfau, 63, is a career court administrator who entered the court system in 1985, shortly after graduating from Brooklyn Law School with two young children.

                        "Like a lot of women in those circumstances, I went into government," Judge Pfau said.

                        She began her career in the courts as an assistant deputy counsel in the Office of Court Administration, an assignment she describes as "just marvelous."

                        In 1997, she was appointed to the bench by Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani and later served as deputy chief administrative judge for management support, administrative judge for the Second Judicial District and first deputy administrative judge. Judge Pfau also has served as an acting Supreme Court justice in the Commercial Division of Supreme Court in Brooklyn.

                        In every court position she has held for the past 22 years, Judge Pfau worked closely with Judge Lippman.

                        "That personal bond that I have had with her for so many years, the friendship, the admiration, and the great, great affection I have for her, is for me and the courts a lifetime relationship, and I am very grateful to her personally and on behalf of the institution," Judge Lippman said.

                        Judge Pfau's parting advice to her successor: "Recognize that not every problem is solvable. The problems can seem overwhelming, but it all works out. And enjoy the trip between New York City and Albany, because you will make it often."

                        Comment


                        • Good riddance. Her replacement is highly regarded http://online.wsj.com/article/AP3a32...d60a07001.html
                          Last edited by soon2retire; 10-22-2011, 08:45 AM.
                          RETIRED 9-16-10

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by soon2retire View Post
                            Good riddance. Her replacement is highly regarded http://online.wsj.com/article/AP3a32...d60a07001.html
                            I like the fact that Pfau's replacement wants to find new revenue sources. That might mean more financial stability for the courts. Let's see what happens.
                            Last edited by Cravan; 10-22-2011, 02:27 PM.

                            Comment


                            • I wonder if Pfau was forced out or just had enough. I also heard Prudenti is highly regarded and appreciates what Officers do. We'll see what happens. I'm not sure if you guys know but the new academy in crown heights is supposed to be operational in 2012. ALL new hires for the state will pass through brooklyn. 54000 square feet, gym, dormitory, mess hall, classrooms ....the real deal... eventually it will be a full 6 month program.... http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categor..._id=4&id=46565

                              IMHO despite the bad economy this job is still evolving and growing. Hopefully Judge Prudenti will help the job grow. Stay in shape, and save up that 3grand for uniforms & gear boys and girls.....The new budget year isn't that far away, and if the call comes make sure your ready.

                              As a side note, We lost our brother officer SCO Keith Johnson from 60 centre st. He was a court officer in the bronx and manhattan for over 25 years and was still OTJ. His wake and funeral was this past thrusday and friday. There had to be over 100 officers present...It was a sea of blue.... I'd like to express my gratitude to our Cermonial unit, our Pipe and Drum Band, COA & SCOA all of our officers AND bosses, as well as dept. of corrections for the bus and our MSP & NYPD for the escort. We were able to give him the proper funeral & send off that he deserved. He was a good man and good officer and will be missed
                              Last edited by unblindeacon; 10-22-2011, 03:18 PM.
                              http://i46.tinypic.com/152i8tt.jpg
                              NEVER FORGETTING OUR HERO'S

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by unblindeacon View Post
                                I wonder if Pfau was forced out or just had enough. I also heard Prudenti is highly regarded and appreciates what Officers do. We'll see what happens. I'm not sure if you guys know but the new academy in crown heights is supposed to be operational in 2012. ALL new hires for the state will pass through brooklyn. 54000 square feet, gym, dormitory, mess hall, classrooms ....the real deal... eventually it will be a full 6 month program.... http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categor..._id=4&id=46565

                                IMHO despite the bad economy this job is still evolving and growing. Hopefully Judge Prudenti will help the job grow. Stay in shape, and save up that 3grand for uniforms & gear boys and girls.....The new budget year isn't that far away, and if the call comes make sure your ready.

                                As a side note, We lost our brother officer SCO Keith Johnson from 60 centre st. He was a court officer in the bronx and manhattan for over 25 years and was still OTJ. His wake and funeral was this past thrusday and friday. There had to be over 100 officers present...It was a sea of blue.... I'd like to express my gratitude to our Cermonial unit, our Pipe and Drum Band, COA & SCOA all of our officers AND bosses, as well as dept. of corrections for the bus and our MSP & NYPD for the escort. We were able to give him the proper funeral & send off that he deserved. He was a good man and good officer and will be missed
                                Wow!!! That sounds like great news. I hope there is an academy class in 2012. I am going to keep my fingers crossed. I would love to be in the first recruit class to be trained in the new Brooklyn facility.

                                I heard about SCO Keith Johnson and I am sorry to hear of his passing. I send out my sincerest condolences to his family and friends. May he rest in peace.

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