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  • Def. That was one of the reasons i ended up at corrections. gov. patterson froze that exam and did not call anyone from the last exam. ( i wasn't finshed with school anyway but I figured I could get a good feel for working with crooks as a CO first. glad I did. these guys are masters of game. when I do make it to parole I will see the game long before they can start. got a family member now i parole and they had to admit the first fews years they get over on you till you learn em. going to warrant officer I can go to parole from there if I don't want the courts.

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    • Originally posted by onsoroma View Post
      Def. That was one of the reasons i ended up at corrections. gov. patterson froze that exam and did not call anyone from the last exam. ( i wasn't finshed with school anyway but I figured I could get a good feel for working with crooks as a CO first. glad I did. these guys are masters of game. when I do make it to parole I will see the game long before they can start. got a family member now i parole and they had to admit the first fews years they get over on you till you learn em. going to warrant officer I can go to parole from there if I don't want the courts.

      Great. You are on the right track to obtaining your desired career. I had also taken the last Parole Officer exam to no avail. You are in a good position because you are planning to transfer from one state job to another. You are able to keep your time and pension. Warrant Officer is under NY Parole so you will be one step closer to becoming a Parole Officer. Good luck.

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      • You may or may not know but the hospital police exam is given two days a week in NYC if that's where you live, you can get peace officer status that way and enviromental police also is given an exam now . . . so is nyc corrections good jobs to take just to get in until you find the one you want. just a thought.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by onsoroma View Post
          You may or may not know but the hospital police exam is given two days a week in NYC if that's where you live, you can get peace officer status that way and enviromental police also is given an exam now . . . so is nyc corrections good jobs to take just to get in until you find the one you want. just a thought.

          I am in the city. Thanks for the information.

          Comment


          • Gov. Cuomo begins process to lay off 3,500 workers after union rejects tentative contract



            ALBANY - Gov. Cuomo began the process to lay off 3,500 workers Tuesday night after the state's second-largest employee union rejected a tentative contract that would have avoided job cuts.

            Cuomo urged Public Employees Federation members to reconsider, while a top administration official slammed union leaders and warned layoffs would start promptly unless a new vote was scheduled.

            "We spent months working with PEF's leadership and reached an agreement," said Director of State Operations Howard Glaser. "We now find out that they do not truly represent their membership."

            Glaser blamed the contract's defeat on the failure of PEF leaders to "effectively communicate" the deal's benefits to members.

            Layoff notices went out to PEF workers late yesterday and take effect in 21 days, another administration official said.

            PEF spokeswoman Darcy Wells said it's too early to say if union leaders would schedule a new vote, but noted the overwhelming message from the membership was that the contract was unacceptable.

            Earlier in the day, Union President Ken Brynien said PEF members "clearly feel they are being asked to sacrifice more than others, particularly in light of the pending expiration of the state's millionaire's tax."

            Brynien called on Cuomo to return to the bargaining table.

            Union members voted, 54% to 46%, to reject the five-year deal that called for employees to forgo raises for the first three years and accept 2% increases in each of the final two years. The deal, announced over the summer, also called for union members to pay more for health insurance.

            "There are just so many bad things about it financially," said one PEF member as she left work. "It was a bad, bad contract."

            The union represents 56,000 professional scientific and technical workers.

            The state's largest public employees union, the Civil Service Employees Association, ratified a similar agreement last month.

            Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver (D-Manhattan) said he was disappointed by the vote but urged both sides to resolve the matter without layoffs.

            "These are tough economic times, and I hope that everyone involved can come together to make the shared sacrifices that are necessary," Silver said.

            Meanwhile, the contract rejection was welcomed by Transport Workers Union Local 100, representing some 35,000 bus and subway workers.

            "This puts Local 100 in a stronger position when the [TWU] contract expires Jan. 15," said TWU Local 100 President John Samuelsen. "It's a huge boost for us."

            Comment


            • Police Seek Escape Path And Escapees

              As police and correction officers searched all five boroughs yesterday for two defendants who escaped Tuesday from a holding cell in State Supreme Court in Brooklyn, investigators were trying to determine how they got free.

              A small metal door at the back of the cell, leading into a plumbing crawlspace, was found ajar, officials said. They said the door, normally locked with a key, had not been forced open. The crawlspace leads to a closet and then a public corridor.

              A law-enforcement official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said a focus of the investigation was whether maintenance workers had been in the area earlier in the day and had, perhaps, failed to lock the small door.

              Also yesterday, a correction officer on duty at the time, Jose Jordan, was suspended for 10 days while the investigation continues.

              The two defendants, one being tried for murder and the other facing separate assault and robbery charges, made their escape from the basement cell in the 11-story courthouse at 360 Adams Street sometime between 2 and 3 P.M. Tuesday, touching off an immediate search of downtown Brooklyn.

              Yesterday, Thomas Antenen, a spokesman for the Department of Correction, said correction and police officers were continuing "a citywide search" for the two men -- Donzel Mignott, 22, of Bedford-Stuyvesant, the murder suspect, and Justin Jones, the robbery suspect. The district attorney's office could not provide his age and address yesterday.

              Defendants are brought to the courthouse in vans from Rikers Island, with the vans driving right into the basement. Mr. Antenen said prisoners are not handcuffed while they are in the cells.

              Mr. Mignott and Mr. Jones were in the cell together because Mr. Mignott's murder trial had halted for lunch and Mr. Jones was awaiting a pretrial hearing. Because of the escape, Acting Justice Herbert J. Lipp declared a mistrial in Mr. Mignott's case, which involved a shooting over a street craps game.

              "We were ready to make closing arguments," Mr. Mignott's lawyer, Gary Farrell, said. "I thought we had a chance to win."

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              • New York Judge Seeks New System for Juveniles

                New York State has long dealt with 16- and 17-year-old defendants more severely than almost every other state, trying all of them as adults in criminal courts. Now, New York’s chief judge is calling for a less punitive approach that would focus on finding ways to rehabilitate them.

                The judge, Jonathan Lippman, is proposing that the state transfer jurisdiction for 16- and 17-year-olds accused of less serious crimes to family courts, which have more social services, while continuing to prosecute the most violent juveniles as adults. The plan reflects an emerging consensus in many states that troubled teenagers have been mishandled by the adult court system.

                If the state adopts the plan, it will most likely have to allocate more money for social services and for the court system, which is already financially overburdened. The change would require a reorganization of the network of city and state agencies in the criminal justice system. The roles of judges, prosecutors, correction and probation officers and many others would change.

                “I think it’s complex but feasible,” said Edwina G. Richardson-Mendelson, the administrative judge for New York City Family Court, which would have to handle tens of thousands more cases each year under the plan.

                Judge Lippman’s proposal would have to be approved by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and the State Legislature. The Republican majority in the State Senate has often favored more stringent criminal justice measures, and may be reluctant to approve it.

                A spokesman for Mr. Cuomo did not immediately respond to requests for comment. A spokesman for the Senate majority leader, Dean G. Skelos of Long Island, said his office would review the proposal.

                The Democratic majority in the Assembly has historically supported such measures.

                New York and North Carolina are the only states that try all 16-year-olds as adults. This year, North Carolina lawmakers introduced legislation to move those cases to juvenile court. Several other states have made similar moves in recent years.

                In a speech that Judge Lippman is scheduled to give on Wednesday to the Citizens Crime Commission of New York City, he is to push for the state’s sentencing commission to draft a bill to be introduced in the State Legislature at the beginning of the 2012 session in January.

                He also plans, in the coming months, to establish a pilot program of adolescent criminal courts, dedicated to handling the cases of 16- and 17-year-old defendants. These defendants would continue to be processed in the adult court system, but judges would handle the cases as if the defendants were in Family Court.

                “I want to be able to show that this works while the legislation is pending,” Mr. Lippman said in an interview.

                The judge’s proposal spotlights an issue that state lawmakers and judicial officials have long pledged to tackle. When the state’s juvenile justice law, the Family Court Act, was enacted in 1962, the Legislature chose 16 as the age of criminal responsibility as a temporary measure until public hearings and research could be conducted. The state did not carry out those steps, and the age was never changed.

                Judge Lippman said the time had passed for another legislative task force. “To be sure, there are issues that have to be addressed, and we will do that,” he said. “But I don’t believe we should be studying this to death.”

                Instead, Judge Lippman said, he will turn to an informal network that has been working behind the scenes on the legal and procedural issues of raising the age of juvenile jurisdiction.

                “We will be speaking with the advocacy groups and the institutional players to make sure we understand their concerns and address their concerns,” said Richard M. Aborn, president of the Citizens Crime Commission.

                Judge Lippman is also working with the New York Center for Juvenile Justice, run by a retired judge, Michael A. Corriero, an advocate for raising the age.

                Every state maintains one court and correctional system for juveniles and another for adults. The juvenile system generally has more employees as well as programming that focuses on treatment and rehabilitation. Juvenile court records are sealed, making it easier for young people who do not commit crimes as adults to find jobs, apply for public housing and receive financial aid for college.

                Thirty-seven states, the District of Columbia and the federal government have set the age of criminal responsibility at 18; 11 states have set the age at 17.

                There were 45,873 youths ages 16 and 17 arrested last year in New York State, according to the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services. The overwhelming majority of the arrests were for nonviolent crimes.

                Opponents of changes in the system in other states have questioned the costs of transferring more people to juvenile courts at a time when states are facing deep budget deficits.

                Many supporters have pointed to a 2005 decision by the Supreme Court, in Roper v. Simmons, which banned the death penalty for defendants who were younger than 18 when their crimes were committed. The court’s majority based its decision on the “general differences” distinguishing people under 18 from adults: lack of maturity, greater susceptibility to peer pressure and undeveloped character.

                Studies have also concluded that adolescents who are tried as adults are more likely to go on to commit other crimes.

                John Feinblatt, the chief criminal justice adviser for Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, offered tentative support for Mr. Lippman’s proposal.

                “The practical considerations should not shut down the discussion,” Mr. Feinblatt said. “They should be part of the discussion.”

                Comment


                • No criminal trials at 360 Adams Street. Sounds like the press got it wrong again.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Dinosaur32 View Post
                    No criminal trials at 360 Adams Street. Sounds like the press got it wrong again.
                    Lol.

                    Comment


                    • written psych?

                      Anyone take the written psychological yet? I had my meeting with my background investigator a while ago now, just wondering if I can't expect to hear anything soon. Anyone get any further than the psych?

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by MP1212 View Post
                        Anyone take the written psychological yet? I had my meeting with my background investigator a while ago now, just wondering if I can't expect to hear anything soon. Anyone get any further than the psych?
                        I took my written psychological when I handed in my background packet...i did that about 8-9 months ago then everything stopped...

                        Comment


                        • Freeze?

                          Is there a freeze in the screening process by any chance? I know some recruits who passed the PAT are scheduled to meet with their investigators on 11/15/11. Is that still the case?

                          Comment


                          • I had my meeting with my background investigator 2-3 months ago and they didn't do the psych the same day, I guess they're spreading it out since there's no rush. Did you find out your results of the psych? How long did that take?

                            Comment


                            • Screening process

                              Most of you guys are almost finished with the screening process. Most of you guys only need the one-on-one psychological interview with the Psychologist and a review from the Evaluation Board. After that you all are pretty much done with the screening process.

                              I waited a long time to see the Psychologist and to get cleared by the Evaluation Board. It took me about 2 years to complete the entire screening process. Good luck to all!!!
                              Last edited by Cravan; 10-10-2011, 02:14 PM.

                              Comment


                              • Buyout rumors for early 2012

                                I heard a rumor that OCA plans to conduct another retirement buyout in early 2012. Has anyone else heard about this?

                                Comment

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