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  • Originally posted by Dannytzo View Post
    I am heading back to the acedemy for a retest on the Arm Hand Steediness part. Can anyone be kind enough to give any advice on it? I dont want to be disqualified for something like this. How many hits on the metal ring are you allowed?

    Thanks in advance..
    Good luck on the re-test. The Arm Hand Steadiness test was kind of difficult in my opinion. I thought I was going to fail the PAT because of this test. My advice for you is to practice at home. When is your re-test?

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Cravan View Post
      If the police status bill were passed Court Officers would probably have more work to do (i.e. writing tickets.). I wonder if many Court Officers support the bill.
      I already have written too many tickets / C summons LOL! And I exercise a LOT of discretion lol. The spit in my lockerroom is 75-25 in favor. I guess the biggest plus would be potentially better money, retirement at 20 years. Now its 30/55 but the politicians are looking to kill even that. I think NYPD is approaching 22+ years and the city wants to end the VSF. I really don't know why Gov. Patterson vetoed it. I'm guessing because of the increased benefits cost & additional training cost (we don't get EVOC).
      Last edited by unblindeacon; 08-25-2011, 08:32 PM.
      http://i46.tinypic.com/152i8tt.jpg
      NEVER FORGETTING OUR HERO'S

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Dannytzo View Post
        I am heading back to the acedemy for a retest on the Arm Hand Steediness part. Can anyone be kind enough to give any advice on it? I dont want to be disqualified for something like this. How many hits on the metal ring are you allowed?

        Thanks in advance..
        NYS COURT OFFICER PAT WITH PICTURES:

        http://www.nycourts.gov/careers/cot/...ity-test.shtml

        I really don't know how many times you can hit it...its really tough... that hole is small as hell lol!



        Don't hold your breath. Do some exercises to increase forearm strength...hand grips too. Most important is to stay calm. If you hit it just relax, don't freak out and cause yourself to fail it. Good luck
        Last edited by unblindeacon; 08-25-2011, 08:41 PM.
        http://i46.tinypic.com/152i8tt.jpg
        NEVER FORGETTING OUR HERO'S

        Comment


        • Originally posted by unblindeacon View Post
          I already have written too many tickets / C summons LOL! And I exercise a LOT of discretion lol. The spit in my lockerroom is 75-25 in favor. I guess the biggest plus would be potentially better money, retirement at 20 years. Now its 30/55 but the politicians are looking to kill even that. I think NYPD is approaching 22+ years and the city wants to end the VSF. I really don't know why Gov. Patterson vetoed it. I'm guessing because of the increased benefits cost & additional training cost (we don't get EVOC).
          Hey,

          NYPD is currently 22+ years. NYPD officers still receive VSF, but Bloomberg is trying to get rid of it. What does EVOC stand for?

          Comment


          • Police Officer status was pretty much agreed upon by the political honchos. Then Patterson appointed his buddy Lippman as Chief Judge. Jon has no clue and greatly resents what political juice the two main Court Officer unions have. So Jon got Dave to kill the bill. There would have been funds available to OCA with the change in status.

            Comment


            • State Commission Approves Pay Raise For Judges

              By: Courtney Gross

              Judges have been without a raise for more than a decade, but a new special state commission changed that Friday. NY1’s Courtney Gross filed the following report.

              Judge Lizbeth Gonzalez has been on the bench since 1999, and she hasn't received a raise since.

              "Our staff earns more than we do. Each individual judge has forfeited $330,000 in cost of living increases," said Gonzalez.

              That's about to change.

              A special state commission charged with setting judicial pay voted to give those in robes their first pay increase in more than a dozen years on Friday.

              Judges will see a 27 percent pay hike from $136,700 to $174,000. The increase will be phased in over three years starting in 2012.

              The commission approved the raise by a vote of four to three, but many judges wanted more.

              "It undermines the entire judiciary in numerous ways. It undermines the pool of people that apply to become judges,” said Daniel Turbow, a Brooklyn family court judge.

              The panel's chairman, former Comptroller Bill Thompson, said the commission had to consider the economy.

              "Given the fiscal situation in the state, given the difficulties, given the fact that it doesn't appear that things are getting better, it appears the economy is stagnant, I think it's fair," said Thompson.

              Judicial pay has long been a politically sensitive issue tied to pay increases for state legislators. The commission was created by the state Legislature last year to take the politics out of judicial pay, but the Legislature still has the power to overturn the commission's decision.

              A statement from Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver championed the commission's independence.

              Mark Mulholland, the State Senate majority's representative who voted against the proposal, was not as satisfied.

              "There will be many, many members of the state legislature who will be disappointed with the raise and who will conclude it’s inadequate. Whether the lack of support is sufficient to create a vote against it, I can't say,” said Mulholland.

              The salary increases the commission approved will continue to keep different levels for different court systems. For instance, an appellate court judge would make more than a housing court judge. That is, unless the state Legislature says otherwise.

              Comment


              • CSEA Concessions Scramble Blueprint for Court Negotiations

                Joel Stashenko

                08-22-2011

                ALBANY - Last week's acceptance of a concession-laden contract by a union representing 66,000 state government executive branch employees sets the stage for what could be difficult and protracted negotiations between the court system and 12 unions representing its 15,000 nonjudicial employees.

                The contract approved in a mail vote by members of the Civil Service Employees Association (CSEA) freezes wages for three years, requires unpaid furloughs and increases health insurance contributions.

                Governor Andrew M. Cuomo was able to use the threat of layoffs as leverage to secure a deal he touted as "a win for the union and a win for the people of the state."

                Traditionally, the CSEA executive branch contract has set the parameters for the court systems' negotiation with its unions. This year, however, the courts already have laid off 338 union members, trimmed overtime and imposed other cost-cutting measures before contract negotiations even begin in earnest (NYLJ, June 2).

                That could make the unions less receptive to any proposed terms that match the CSEA deal.

                Dennis Quirk, the head of the Court Officers' Association vowed that his 1,700-member union would not agree to mandatory unpaid furloughs or increased health insurance contributions on top of the sacrifices his members already have made.

                "As far as I'm concerned, this court system already laid off employees, already cut overtime and we've already made all the concessions that we are going to make," Mr. Quirk said in an interview. "We've made our concessions. We're done. We are done."

                In particular, he said, "We will battle them to the death on any increase in medical insurance premiums," he said.

                The just-ratified five-year executive branch contract requires workers to take nine unpaid furloughs, although they would be paid for four at the end of the agreement. And it reflects a 2 percent to 6 percent increase in insurance contributions.

                Brian DiGiovanna, president of the Association of Supreme and Surrogates' Court Reporters, said furloughs would also be anathema to members of his union.

                "I don't see how we could go with the furloughs when we have had the layoffs," he said. "That is a significant factor in all these things."

                Mr. DiGiovanna said that members of his union would be "shocked" if the courts did not seek a wage freeze to match the one obtained by Mr. Cuomo.

                "But would they be willing to accept that? I have no idea," he said.

                CSEA also represents more workers in the court system—about 5,900, most of them upstate—than any other union. James Hennerty, the head of the CSEA court unit, declined to comment on whether his members would accept terms similar to those in the executive branch contract.

                CSEA President Danny Donohue said in a statement after the ratification of the executive branch contract that "These are not ordinary times and CSEA worked hard to reach an agreement that we believe would be in everyone's best interest."

                The president of AFSCME's Council 37, Cliff Koppelman, which represents 1,200 clerical and other court support staff, largely in New York City, said that he has approached other unions about the upcoming negotiations, but his union has not yet framed any demands.

                Up to now, he said that the union has been preoccupied by this spring's layoffs, especially the subsequent "bumping" of junior workers by senior ones (NYLJ, April 28).

                But he too said that he expects the court system to seek the same wage terms as Mr. Cuomo—a freeze in the first three years and 2 percent raises in each of the final two years. Under the four-year contract that just expired, court workers received raises of 3 percent in each of the first three years and 4 percent in the final year.

                Mr. Koppelman added he was unsure whether his workers could stomach a wage freeze.

                The court system is under no legal obligation to follow the governor's lead in negotiations. However, administrators have been reluctant in the past to deviate significantly from the terms of the CSEA deal for fear of angering governors or creating salary and benefit scales for Judiciary employees that vary significantly from those of state employees outside the court system.

                Judge Lawrence K. Marks, administrative director of the court system, declined to discuss the approach the courts would take this year in the wake of the layoffs—the first in 20 years—saying that the Judiciary did not want to negotiate in the press.

                "With the recent developments between the executive branch and its largest union, the court system is optimistic that we can reach agreement now with our unions," he said. "Although our circumstances are somewhat different, given the recent layoffs, we believe there are areas of mutual interest with our unions that can facilitate agreements."

                While court officials and unions have discussed a new contract in general terms, no specific contract proposals have been exchanged. Mr. Quirk said his union plans to send the state a set of demands after Labor Day.

                Judge Marks said the Office of Court Administration (OCA) has no timetable for reaching a deal but noted that past contracts have sometimes taken a long time to finalize.

                For example, the last contract with the major court unions, for the four years that ended March 31, was not settled until July 2008. That was 16 months after the previous deal expired and seven months after the executive branch employees finalized their deal.

                Union and state officials said they expect the mechanics of the talks to be similar to those in past years. CSEA and Council 37 representatives traditionally bargain individually with the state on behalf of their members. Most, if not all, of the other unions form a coalition for the talks.

                James Welch, the head of the OCA's labor relations office, will head the negotiating teams for the court system.

                Another 56,000 executive branch employees who are members of the Public Employees Federation still must vote on a recently concluded deal with the Cuomo administration that is similar to the CSEA pact. The balloting results are expected to be released by late September.

                PEF represents no court employees, but several union sources speculated that OCA would not enter into serious talks until those results are available.

                Messrs. Quirk and Koppelman and Judge Marks all said that while negotiations may be difficult this year, they are hopeful that fair results can be achieved without combativeness.

                "Obviously, we go into this in the spirit of cooperation and try to identify where our interests coincide," Judge Marks said.

                Mr. Quirk said the members of coalition have high regard for Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman, Administrative Judge Ann Pfau and Judge Marks and are not looking to be needlessly "contentious."

                "Our attitude is always that we are looking to negotiate and to do deals," said Mr. Koppelman. "We don't have a history of going in [to negotiations] looking for a fight. We are businesslike. I don't look at it as a war. I may not be happy with all we get, and they may not be happy with what they get. But we are looking to negotiate the best terms."

                Comment


                • I got an 85.

                  Comment


                  • Hey Todd. I got an 85 on the exam. Last I heard they were down to people who got a 91.
                    Originally posted by Todd57 View Post
                    Hey sferguson- I am from the 4th JD and took the exam in 2009. I have not received a canvas letter yet. OCA did NYC first off the 2009 list and we should be next for the next round of canvas letters. What rank are you and what did you score? If you don't mind me asking. I got a 88.3 and my rank is 500x.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Dinosaur32 View Post
                      Police Officer status was pretty much agreed upon by the political honchos. Then Patterson appointed his buddy Lippman as Chief Judge. Jon has no clue and greatly resents what political juice the two main Court Officer unions have. So Jon got Dave to kill the bill. There would have been funds available to OCA with the change in status.
                      If you read Patterson's veto message, he very politely states in highly politically correct language that Court Officers are not real cops. He also states that he sees no reason why Court Officers need the authority to execute arrest warrants. If only he could have been there all those times as we watched individuals with violent felony warrants stroll out of the court house because the issuing jurisdiction could not get there to pick them up before their case was called. We had no authority to even detain them, and Heaven forbid we ask the judges to delay calling their case. That would be bad customer service, and might cost them votes. Because as we all know, the rapists and gang bangers who collect welfare are the largest voting block in the state...

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Cravan View Post
                        If the police status bill were passed Court Officers would probably have more work to do (i.e. writing tickets.). I wonder if many Court Officers support the bill.
                        When I was there we all supported the bill because of the increased grant funding that would be available for training and equipment, not to mention the potential improvement in retirement benefits. It really wouldn't increase the workload any if at all. Court Officers already possess the authority to write tickets, so there would be absolutely no difference there.

                        Now that I work as a patrol officer I support Police status for Court Officers even more. The issues that I deal with now are not that much different from what I did in and around the courthouse every day.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Fuerza View Post
                          When I was there we all supported the bill because of the increased grant funding that would be available for training and equipment, not to mention the potential improvement in retirement benefits. It really wouldn't increase the workload any if at all. Court Officers already possess the authority to write tickets, so there would be absolutely no difference there.

                          Now that I work as a patrol officer I support Police status for Court Officers even more. The issues that I deal with now are not that much different from what I did in and around the courthouse every day.
                          Hey,

                          I got friends within the NYPD who tell me that being a Court Officer is a better job than being a Police Officer. My friends always complain about writing too many tickets and answering petty radio calls. They also say that being on patrol is very stressful. Do you agree?
                          Last edited by Cravan; 09-02-2011, 04:15 PM.

                          Comment


                          • Hey fellow postponed recruits,

                            Since the Jan 6, 2011 recruit class was postponed, do we have to redo the Pre-Appointment Medical Exam once another class goes in?

                            Comment


                            • Cravan I have been reading your previous posts and you seem like a superb guy. I know of your story and I would be really happy for you if you get that call.
                              The reason why some people prefer courts over PD is because its more of a relaxed enviornment to work. I have made friends with court officers in Kings county and they are happy people. We have a great relationship with them and I have yet to meet a bitter CO. Also the guys I know dont worry about petty things like shaving. With nypd you can go above 100K after a while if you really push it, but its more stressful IMO. At the moment its a money issue. I am Def going to look into the CO job when im much older (correct me if im wrong, theres no age limit right?)

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by nypd11218 View Post
                                Cravan I have been reading your previous posts and you seem like a superb guy. I know of your story and I would be really happy for you if you get that call.
                                The reason why some people prefer courts over PD is because its more of a relaxed enviornment to work. I have made friends with court officers in Kings county and they are happy people. We have a great relationship with them and I have yet to meet a bitter CO. Also the guys I know dont worry about petty things like shaving. With nypd you can go above 100K after a while if you really push it, but its more stressful IMO. At the moment its a money issue. I am Def going to look into the CO job when im much older (correct me if im wrong, theres no age limit right?)
                                Hey NYPD 11218,

                                Thanks for the compliment and for hoping that I get the job. You are not the first law enforcement officer I've heard talk about switching to the courts once they get older. A friend of mine has been a Parole Officer for over twenty years and he told me that he would like to switch over to the courts because he is getting too old to be fighting with parolees. He also stated that it's a money issue for him as well. Currently, there is no age limit for Court Officers.

                                Comment

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