Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

NYS Court Officers

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by unblindeacon View Post
    Sorry guys not a whole lot going on right now. I haven't even heard any contract rumors lol. Its the summer so nothing is really happening. The only thing that I have heard is that A NYSCO is on season 3 of top shot on history channel.

    http://www.history.com/shows/top-sho...s#meet-michael
    Once again man, thanks for the information. I do not think state employees will get a raise soon. I know Cuomo just worked out a deal with the PEF union to avert layoffs. The deal consists of no new raises until after three years.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by unblindeacon View Post
      Sorry guys not a whole lot going on right now. I haven't even heard any contract rumors lol. Its the summer so nothing is really happening. The only thing that I have heard is that A NYSCO is on season 3 of top shot on history channel.

      http://www.history.com/shows/top-sho...s#meet-michael
      I just checked out the video. It is very cool. I hope Michael wins. I am going to watch the show. I really like the court officer uniform. I can't wait to be a court officer. Thanks man.

      Comment


      • Hey cravan....your welcome man....i want to see all you guys get hired. I remember when I was coming here for info and people like soon2retire & dinosaur32 were there for me so I'm just trying to do the same for you. Whenever I hear anything I will be sure to let you know. Its a great job....maybe the best le job out there.
        Last edited by unblindeacon; 08-07-2011, 04:39 PM.
        http://i46.tinypic.com/152i8tt.jpg
        NEVER FORGETTING OUR HERO'S

        Comment


        • Originally posted by unblindeacon View Post
          Hey cravan....your welcome man....i want to see all you guys get hired. I remember when I was coming here for info and people like soon2retire & dinosaur32 were there for me so I'm just trying to do the same for you. Whenever I hear anything I will be sure to let you know. Its a great job....maybe the best le job out there.
          Thanks for the info and encouragement. I have a friend who is a court officer and he said that it was the best decision he made to take the job. I know the freeze will lift, but I am human and would like for it to be raised now LOL!!!.

          Comment


          • Office of Court Administration Urges Pay Raise for N.Y. State Judges


            Court administrators on Monday urged "an immediate and substantial" salary increase for 1,200 state judges who have not had a raise since January 1999, pressing for a raise of as much as 41 percent for state Supreme Court justices, who now make $136,700.

            Andrew Keshner and Joel Stashenko
            07-12-2011

            New York court administrators Monday urged "an immediate and substantial" salary increase for 1,200 state judges who have not had a raise since January 1999.

            A report submitted by Chief Administrative Judge Ann Pfau presented several scenarios to the state's Special Commission on Judicial Compensation for a salary of between $192,000 and $220,000 for Supreme Court justices, who now make $136,700. The top end would constitute a 41 percent raise.

            Urging the commission to shun "half measures," the Office of Court Administration said that the panel should recommend a raise that eliminates much of the current pay shortfall in one big step despite the state's fiscal condition.

            The seven-member commission, which held its first meeting Monday, is scheduled to report its conclusions to the governor and Legislature by Aug. 29 for the fiscal year that begins April 1, 2012. Unless the Legislature acts to block its recommendations, they will automatically become law. (See the law establishing the pay commission.)

            "I do think this is a thoughtful analysis of what has come before to help develop alternatives for the commission to consider," Pfau said in an interview.

            However, the comments of commission members seemed to suggest that the current economic climate could be a major sticking point in determining how much judges will receive.

            One of Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman's two choices to the panel, Kathryn S. Wylde, CEO of the Partnership of New York City, questioned how much of a role the economy should play in the commission's choices.

            "It is a blip in terms of the overall state budget," she said.

            But William Thompson Jr., the former New York City comptroller who was picked by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo to chair the commission, responded that the panel "can't fully ignore the state's condition."

            In fact, the economy is one of the factors the law creating the commission directs it to consider. Moreover, the panel begins its deliberations as Cuomo has been battling public employee unions for concessions over the past several months that could avoid layoffs. And the courts already have been forced by budget cuts to lay off several hundred workers.

            Pfau's report laid out several reasons why the state's fiscal condition should not block a major raise.

            First, it notes that the state has repeatedly deferred a raise. Had it acted in a more timely fashion, there would be no need for a large adjustment now, the report argues.

            Moreover, it says that every $10,000 statewide increase in judicial salaries constitutes an increase in the state budget of only 9/1,000ths of 1 percent.

            Finally, it observes that the establishment of the commission marks the first real opportunity to consider salaries in a non-political manner, using rational, objective and predictable criteria.

            Thompson indicated at Monday's meeting that he would like to come to a final decision on compensation weeks ahead of a late-August deadline.

            "I think the recommendations we make are going to be the levels of compensation," Thompson said.

            The panel will hold a public hearing at 11 a.m. on July 20 in Albany where individuals will have three minutes and organizations seven minutes to present their views. The venue has not yet been announced.

            Commission member Mark Mulholland of Ruskin Moscou Faltischek in Uniondale, N.Y., called information on the purchasing power of judicial salaries "a critical starting point," later adding it was necessary to consider the amount of money lost through inflation as salaries stayed the same.

            Robert Fiske Jr., senior counsel at Davis Polk & Wardwell, said the submissions of both the OCA and the Coalition of New York State Judicial Associations, an alliance of 12 judicial associations that proposed a 41 percent raise, offered "a very thorough analysis of the relevant factors."

            William Mulrow, senior managing director at Blackstone, said it would be important to consider how much of an increase the state could afford.

            James Tallon Jr., president of the United Hospital Fund of New York and a former Democratic assemblyman, said the panel should look at the "totality" of the state's compensation of other public employees in leadership and executive positions.

            Richard Cotton, executive vice president and general counsel of NBC-Universal, said he would like to hear the perspective of the business community, and to know the number of judges who have left the bench for the private sector due to lower pay.

            In an interview, Thompson called commission members "an informed group of people interested in working hard and coming to a conclusion."

            In addition to the commission members, about a dozen others attended the meeting, which was held at the midtown Manhattan offices of the Empire State Development Corp. Bronx Acting Supreme Court Justice Lizbeth Gonzalez, the president of the Association of Judges of Hispanic Heritage, was among the attendees.

            "It appears that the body respects who we are as judges and understands the gravity of our financial circumstances, given the fact we received no pay raise or cost of living increase for more than 12 years," she said.

            Brooklyn Family Court Judge Daniel Turbow, another attendee, said after the meeting that he was "encouraged and impressed" by the proceedings.

            Turbow, who is the president of the New York City Family Court Judges Association, said the commission "has a clear understanding of the harm that's befallen the judiciary in many ways by reason of the failure to get a salary increase."

            The coalition of judicial groups conceded that it would take a "brave" decision by the commission to advocate for its proposed increase. But the groups argued in a 247-page submission that New York's economy is getting somewhat better and that the Judiciary has endured enough sacrifices since its last raise.

            The groups told the commission that Supreme Court justices have lost more than $345,000 in buying power to inflation since 1999.

            Albany Family Court Judge Dennis Duggan was the chief author of the alliance's recommendations.

            "We are looking at [the pay commission] as sort of our jury," he said. "We are presenting our case. The jury will have to make a decision and put aside extraneous things, such as politics. We are confident, based on the evidence, they will give us a significant raise."

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Todd57 View Post
              Thanks for the info and encouragement. I have a friend who is a court officer and he said that it was the best decision he made to take the job. I know the freeze will lift, but I am human and would like for it to be raised now LOL!!!.
              Todd,

              How long has your friend been a court officer and where does he work?

              Comment


              • You guys need to check out this courthouse brawl in Washington. Crazy stuff.

                http://www.kmov.com/video/featured-v...125721513.html

                Comment


                • Long harm of the law
                  Wait to be arraigned 'inhumane'


                  By WILLIAM J. GORTA


                  Hundreds of prisoners are languishing in holding pens -- in violation of a court order -- as overtime and budget cuts wreak havoc with Brooklyn arraignments, The Post has learned.

                  According to data obtained by The Post, nearly half of the prisoners awaiting arraignment at the start of each of six days last week had been held longer than 24 hours without seeing a judge.

                  The arraignment courts were so jammed over the Fourth of July weekend that on July 3 more than 57 percent had exceeded the 24-hour limit.

                  And it only got worse on Independence Day, when it hit 59 percent, with more than a quarter of those 379 prisoners having waited more than 36 hours.

                  Between Sunday and Friday, July 8, nearly 44 percent of the people in the system had been there in excess of 24 hours.

                  The delays -- spurred by $170 million in budget slashes that included weekend courtroom hours -- are in direct violation of a 1991 Court of Appeals ruling that any delay over 24 hours was "unnecessary."

                  "Last week was not a great week, and the holiday weekend did not help matters," said Judge Lawrence Marks, administrative director of the Office of Court Administration.

                  Delays are common throughout the city, he noted, but "Brooklyn has presented the greatest challenge."

                  And while he insisted that the daily snapshot numbers exaggerate the extent of the problem, his own figures were not much better: On average, 37 percent had been illegally held more than 24 hours without seeing a judge.

                  Reduced weekend hours, in place since June 11, are causing the system to bottleneck, Marks said.

                  Arraignments used to run from 9 a.m. to 1 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Those days now have a single shift of 1 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

                  A 3-11 p.m. shift and a third arraignment part were added on Fridays to try to reduce the weekend workload, Marks said.

                  Still, many of the people arrested over the weekend finally got to see a judge yesterday afternoon.

                  "They arrested me on Friday at 5:30 [p.m.], and I just got out now -- 72 hours later. It ain't right," said Donald Haywood, 16, after being arraigned on assault and weapon-possession charges.

                  Ana Rios, arrested for alleged criminal mischief Saturday night, waited about 40 hours.

                  "It's horrible," she said. "It's inhumane. There's nothing clean back there."

                  Defense lawyer James Kirshner said the holding pens were "packed like sardines" yesterday.

                  And that, said Dennis Quirk, head of the court officers' union, endangers his members and the public.

                  "It is a safety issue, definitely a major security problem," he said.

                  A lawyer can get a writ of habeas corpus from a Supreme Court justice to force officials to produce the prisoner, but "by the time you're finished, the guy will probably be out anyway," Kirshner said.

                  "It's a law with no effect."

                  Defense attorney Gerald Lefcourt, who submitted a friend-of-the-court brief in the 1991 appeal, knows that all too well.

                  "This has been a perennial problem," he said. "It just goes on and on."

                  Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/b...#ixzz1UPgfASqi

                  Comment


                  • OCA Distributes $12.5 Million to 56 Civil Legal Service Providers

                    ALBANY - Court administrators yesterday identified the recipients of $12.5 million in grants from the court's budget to provide civil legal services in New York state.

                    The funds will be distributed among 56 legal services providers in allotments ranging from $21,300 to just under $1.4 million. Under guidelines laid down by Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman, the funds will be used for legal representation in areas he has described as the "essentials" of life—housing, health care, education, disability benefits and employment, as well as domestic violence.

                    See List of Recipients and Allotments.

                    Judge Lippman said the $12.5 million represents the first down payment of a new allocation of $100 million over the next four years. He said he had hoped to include $25 million in the 2011-12 state budget for civil legal services (NYLJ, April 1), but $170 million in cuts to the Judiciary's $2.7 billion budget caused the reduction in funds and resulted in more than 300 layoffs within the court system earlier this year.

                    Both Judge Lippman and Chief Administrative Judge Ann Pfau said the Judiciary plans to restore the $12.5 million in allocations for civil legal services over the next three years, and will try to meet the additional $75 million the courts set as a goal for funding civil legal services through fiscal year 2014-15.

                    The allocations announced yesterday were decided by Judge Pfau, Benito Romano, the chairman of the board of the Interest on Lawyer Accounts, and Helaine M. Barnett, chairwoman of Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman's Task Force to Expand Access to Civil Legal Services (NYLJ, Oct. 13, 2010) and the former president of the Legal Services Corp. in Washington, D.C.

                    Judge Pfau said yesterday that the panel approving the distributions followed Judge Lippman's guidance about supporting groups that could provide specific legal services, like housing and employment, and distributing the money geographically according to each region's percentage of residents within 200 percent or less of the federal poverty threshold.

                    The Legal Aid Society of New York is in line for the largest grant, $1,358,462.

                    Steven Banks, attorney-in-chief of the group, said the additional funding will lay the groundwork for improvements in the civil legal services system.

                    "With other cuts and increasing demand because of the continuing economic downturn, this funding is a real lifeline to make a difference for low-income families and individuals who we could not otherwise help," he said yesterday.

                    Anne Erickson of the Albany-based Empire Justice Center, which assists clients with foreclosure, disability, unemployment and other home-based issues, said the funding will represent an important infusion of resources. Her group, which qualified for $278,050, serves clients in the Second, Third and Fourth Appellate Division departments.

                    Ms. Erickson said much of the new money will have to be used to meet the legal demands of clients buffeted by the current economic turmoil.

                    "We are constantly running like maniacs just to stand in place," she said.

                    Lillian Moy, head of the Legal Aid Society of Northeastern New York, said the group's $627,000 grant represents a rescue from the loss of about $320,000 in legislative funding in recent years, not to mention the uncertainty in funding for the federal Legal Services Corp. The group represents poor clients in a 16-county area from Clinton County on the Canadian border to south of Albany.

                    Ms. Moy said the funding loss was a potential "catastrophe" had the courts not stepped in.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Cravan View Post
                      Todd,

                      How long has your friend been a court officer and where does he work?
                      Cravan- He has been a court officer since 2007. We both took the test in '05 and he did very well, as I did not. I passed but my score was to low. Retook the exam in '09 and did much better. He went into the first academy for upstate and works in JD#4 in Plattsburgh NY.

                      Comment


                      • It is unfortunate that the arraignments are taking so long, but what did the state expect when they cut so much. Someone is going to get hurt and it could have been avoided. I understand that with the state in its fiscal situation cuts had to be made, but maybe not the courts security and people's rights. Hopefully this will urge the state to lift the freeze for the 2012 fiscal year, start up the academies, and make things safer in our courts.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Todd57 View Post
                          Cravan- He has been a court officer since 2007. We both took the test in '05 and he did very well, as I did not. I passed but my score was to low. Retook the exam in '09 and did much better. He went into the first academy for upstate and works in JD#4 in Plattsburgh NY.
                          Cool. I can't believe I am still trying to get hired off the 2005 exam. What a long process. I wish I had scored higher. Oh well.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Todd57 View Post
                            It is unfortunate that the arraignments are taking so long, but what did the state expect when they cut so much. Someone is going to get hurt and it could have been avoided. I understand that with the state in its fiscal situation cuts had to be made, but maybe not the courts security and people's rights. Hopefully this will urge the state to lift the freeze for the 2012 fiscal year, start up the academies, and make things safer in our courts.
                            I hope so Todd. I want to start a career in law enforcement asap. I do not want to go back to social work.

                            Comment


                            • Glad some young blood is around to take the baton lol. I'm pretty much out of the loop as a retiree
                              Originally posted by unblindeacon View Post
                              Hey cravan....your welcome man....i want to see all you guys get hired. I remember when I was coming here for info and people like soon2retire & dinosaur32 were there for me so I'm just trying to do the same for you. Whenever I hear anything I will be sure to let you know. Its a great job....maybe the best le job out there.
                              RETIRED 9-16-10

                              Comment


                              • Is there anyone in 4th JD that took the exam in 2009 get a canvas letter yet? Any news on the next CO Academy class?

                                Comment

                                MR300x250 Tablet

                                Collapse

                                What's Going On

                                Collapse

                                There are currently 4636 users online. 219 members and 4417 guests.

                                Most users ever online was 19,482 at 12:44 PM on 09-29-2011.

                                Welcome Ad

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X