Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mn Dnr

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Mn Dnr

    I am fully aware that there is not going to be an academy for the DNR until at least 2012 but I just had some questions regarding the Conservation Officers job. If there is any DNR Officers here please PM me.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Mn Dnr

    If you don't get any responses, please feel free to post the questions here. A number of us are familiar with DNR Enforcement and although we may not work for them we might be able to answer the questions.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Jim.

      Well some of questions are:

      How is the supervision of the CO?

      What is a, I am not going to say typical, but what would a CO do in a days work?

      Hours? Are they pretty flexible?

      How is the academy, I am assuming it is pretty competitive.

      That's the generalized version of the questions I had. Obviously I will contact the CO that works in my area for a ride along and continue to do ride alongs through out different parts of the state to get a generalized view of the job.

      Thanks for the responses.

      Comment


      • #4
        Though I'm not a C.O, my father was for 33 years... so I have a bit of knowledge on the subject (not necessarily current information though, as he retired a few years ago).



        How is the supervision of the CO?

        What is a, I am not going to say typical, but what would a CO do in a days work?

        Hours? Are they pretty flexible?

        How is the academy, I am assuming it is pretty competitive.

        Answers:
        For the first 3 questions, for the most part, CO's are their own boss. They make their own hours, work when they want, and are extremely flexible. In any typical day you could be (depending on the time of year) out on a lake or river checking fisherman for limit, species of fish, having their fishing license, etc... or sitting on a boat landing checking for foreign plants leaving/entering the water with the boats. Could also be walking through the woods checking hunters, riding an ATV (doing the same), helping a landowner trap some sort of animal that has been bothering them (usually something simple like "that fox ate my chickens again, I want it gone!" or "There's a bear been hangin' around, that there bugger ain't welcome in these here parts.")
        I'm not 100% sure on my information, but I believe all (or at least most) CO's have take-home vehicles along with access to a boat, ATV, snowmobile, etc. For the most part, anything you need in order to complete your work - there will be a way to get ahold of one.

        As for the academy, no idea to be honest, but as far as I'm concerned - that's the VERY last step prior to getting out on patrol; means you've passed all the testing, background, and interview phases, so I would assume that you're pretty much a shoe-in if you complete the academy. I'm not sure what you mean by "competitive" - either "hard in general" or "am I going against my fellow academy-mates, competing for a job?"
        Like I said, I'm not a C.O. so don't know for sure, but I know they're not going to make it easy on you!

        Best advice I can give - get a state fishing and hunting lawbook (that cheap paperback one that they give away at fleet farm, walmart, etc. when you buy a hunting/fishing license) and study that thing like there's no tomorrow. Also know a LOT about different species of animals, plants, etc. (fish, birds, difference between a beaver, woodchuck, otter, etc.) My dad was on the hiring board for quite a few years with the DNR and he said it's pretty crucial that a potential hire is informed when it comes to identifying different species of plants, trees and animals.


        Also, a side note - I talked with a C.O. while I was going through skills last summer, he made it pretty obvious that there's not a great likelyhood of a "new graduate" to get hired with the DNR. In the past 5 academies (average of 20 people per year, total of around 100 recruits), 2 of those individuals were straight out of college - the rest had (for the most part) at least 5 years of prior L.E. experience with another agency.
        Then again, my father told me that the DNR likes to hire people who haven't been "tainted" with city/street policing. It's a bit different approaching someone in the woods with a gun, compared to someone on the street with a gun. You have to know how to react differently in certain situations, and understand that, just because the person has a gun or other weapon, doesn't mean they're doing anything illegal or out to kill you or someone else. It's the same with many other situations - as a street cop you get a whole different mentality and trust of people - the DNR doesn't want to have to "re-train" a person, so supposedly they like someone "untainted"... but then there's that "2 new in the past 100 people" thing - so you decide.

        Sorry this is so stinkin' long, I ramble a bit when I get going.
        -MN85

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks MN85 for the response. I will have at least 3 years full-time experience by the time the next academy rolls around and 5 years total licensed time.

          Thanks for all the great info, I will begin the studying process.

          If I can learn what I did in 7 months from Alexandria, I should be able to know a lot about the DNR laws and wildlife ect. in 2.5 - 3 years.

          Comment

          MR300x250 Tablet

          Collapse

          What's Going On

          Collapse

          There are currently 5674 users online. 326 members and 5348 guests.

          Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

          Welcome Ad

          Collapse
          Working...
          X