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Does a lawsuit look bad for an applicant???

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  • Does a lawsuit look bad for an applicant???

    Hey guys have a question.. And wanted to know what you guys think. I was recently let go from a job due to different philosophy with my manager. He basically made up an excuse and let me go.. No prob since this isnt what I wanted to do forever, and working with him was horrible. However I went to a lawyer, showed him the evidence i had about my job (emails and stuff my boss wrote,) and he told me I have a solid case to at least get a judgment for a year salary. NOW THE QUESTION... Will suing my boss and where I work look bad when Im applying for Police Departments??? I dont want to look like a scumbag lawsuit happy person.. but at the same time I want to stand up for myself when Ive been wronged.. Any info would be great, Thanks Guys!

  • #2
    No information here from me, but I wanted to just point out my disdain for philosophy in college. What a waste of my money that class was. (As long as your not in the process at the moment I would do it, if your going through your background I would use your best judgment)
    one point twenty one jiggowatts....ONE POINT TWENTY ONE JIGGOWATTS!!!

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    • #3
      Even though I don't speak for the LEO side here's some food for thought.

      You brought your case to a lawyer, who I'm assuming is not working for your vested interest as a hardworking citizen but sees the case you brought to him as a dollar sign. Sure you could take the case to trial and what not and sue and even if you win he is still going to take a decent percent of your judgement. Even if you find a lawyer to work on contingency you may still have to pay a multitude of different court costs.

      I've also noticed multiple applications I've filled out have asked if I've been involved or are currently involved in civil litigations.

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      • #4
        As long as you are not the one being sued you're fine.

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        • #5
          I wouldn't see why this would hurt your chances. If you aren't the one being sued its usually not a big concern. People have the right to protect themselves from wrongful termination, and usually a lawsuit is involved. Just disclose EVERYTHING when you apply. Remember, most police departments in IL, and many other states, are Unionized, and deal with litigation all the time. If you are in a profession that isn't Unionized your real only way of protecting yourself and your job from bosses like that is a lawsuit.

          It also helps explain why you were fired from that job, instead of just saying, yeah, I got canned. You have proof, specially if you win.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by nkpd44 View Post
            As long as you are not the one being sued you're fine.
            Forgive me for not being well-versed in the ways of Illinois, but the topic's title intrigued me.

            Once I retired after 30 years with the LAPD and having what's been described as a great resume, I applied for LE jobs in my new home state of Colorado. I came out first on the list for three agencies. The police departments wanted me, but the city risk managers did not and DQ'ed me. My crime? Being a workers comp plaintiff and suing the City of Los Angeles. One of the BI's was kind enough to tell me the truth. The risk manager's attitude was, "If he'll sue his former department, then one day he'll probably sue us."

            On at least half of the application and background packets I filled out, they asked about ever being either a defendent or a plaintiff in any court precedings.

            Of course, that's my experience and your mileage may vary.

            Best of luck.
            "You're never fully dressed without a smile."

            Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

            Three things I know for sure: (1) No bad deed goes unrewarded, (2) No good deed goes unpunished, and (3) It is entirely possible to push the most devoted, loyal and caring person beyond the point where they no longer give a 5h!t.

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            • #7
              I was in civil litigation due to a car accident during my hiring process (plantiff) and it didn't hurt me any.

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              • #8
                That is a big difference from Kieth's experiance and yours. The key is "previous employer" and "will he sue us"

                OP do what you have to do. I don't know all of the details but if it's a situation that may get you jammed up (leaving this job) you may want to sue to protect your name work history.
                MDRDEP:

                There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

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                • #9
                  A Different Point of View

                  One of the purposes of the background is to determine if there is anything in your personal history that meets the criteria for disqualification. Sometimes lawsuits can be an indicator as they help identify conduct you may have engaged in that meets that criteria. This can go both ways - whether you did something wrong and got sued, or you have a history of filing questionable lawsuits, which may suggest you are lacking in the areas of judgment and honesty.

                  I bring the last part up because of how you describe this matter. Most people work in "at will" positions. Unless your have an employment contract with specific grounds for termination that were violated, your serve at the pleasure of your employer and can be terminated for any reason or for no reason, and especially for philosophical differences with your supervisor. In addition, you admit that being terminated was "no problem," yet you are suing anyway.

                  If I was doing your background and I determined that you sued for no other reason than your manager acted within his discretionary decision making authority when he terminated you from an at will position, I would have serious questions about you as an applicant. I would figure that you are sue happy and would extra hard for DQ criteria.
                  Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by L-1 View Post
                    One of the purposes of the background is to determine if there is anything in your personal history that meets the criteria for disqualification. Sometimes lawsuits can be an indicator as they help identify conduct you may have engaged in that meets that criteria. This can go both ways - whether you did something wrong and got sued, or you have a history of filing questionable lawsuits, which may suggest you are lacking in the areas of judgment and honesty.

                    I bring the last part up because of how you describe this matter. Most people work in "at will" positions. Unless your have an employment contract with specific grounds for termination that were violated, your serve at the pleasure of your employer and can be terminated for any reason or for no reason, and especially for philosophical differences with your supervisor. In addition, you admit that being terminated was "no problem," yet you are suing anyway.

                    If I was doing your background and I determined that you sued for no other reason than your manager acted within his discretionary decision making authority when he terminated you from an at will position, I would have serious questions about you as an applicant. I would figure that you are sue happy and would extra hard for DQ criteria.


                    I can agree with you to a point on this. First he says its "no prob" because he stated that job wasnt what he wanted to do for the rest of his life. I take that as he is mad he got fired, but as it isnt what he wants to do with his life he isnt sweating it too much. hes more mad that when he goes to apply for a police position it may come up that he was terminated, and the reason for termination may not be something the PD can over look. I take this as more of, he is suing to protect his name.

                    The second part is this, yes Illinois is at will, his position probably was as well. HOWEVER, there are still grounds for wrongfull termination here too. You may not think so but having a "different phillosophy" can be wronful termination as well depending on what that "phillosophy" is, Hence EEO. He never stated what the situation was exaclty so i wouldnt jump to conclusions that he ISNT talking about something that is protected by EEO Laws. You can also sue for harrassment depending on the circumstances. The employer can make judgement calls and end employment, but there are things they can not do, and I am not just talking about sexual harrassment.


                    The way I see this guys question is, he is suiing to protect his name for future jobs. Unless I am dead wrong and you are just suing for money.



                    Oh and those who talked about Workers Comp Cases, why wouldnt you file a suit? A suit in a workers comp case is to recoup losses from the time spent on WC. I have a case myself. I experienced financial hardship for a year due to WC, and then the insurence refused to pay the medical bills. This happens ALL the time. You have the right to regain your losses for the amount of time you were out of work.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Kieth M. View Post
                      Forgive me for not being well-versed in the ways of Illinois, but the topic's title intrigued me.

                      Once I retired after 30 years with the LAPD and having what's been described as a great resume, I applied for LE jobs in my new home state of Colorado. I came out first on the list for three agencies. The police departments wanted me, but the city risk managers did not and DQ'ed me. My crime? Being a workers comp plaintiff and suing the City of Los Angeles. One of the BI's was kind enough to tell me the truth. The risk manager's attitude was, "If he'll sue his former department, then one day he'll probably sue us."

                      On at least half of the application and background packets I filled out, they asked about ever being either a defendent or a plaintiff in any court precedings.

                      Of course, that's my experience and your mileage may vary.

                      Best of luck.
                      so, did you sue for discrimination?
                      One Shot, One Kill. Anything else is just pu(ff)y!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by cclawdog View Post
                        so, did you sue for discrimination?
                        Let's just say that every one of those departments who says they support the ADA, or does not discrminate yada-yada-yada, was about to get in line...but I got hired by another department and moved on with my life.
                        "You're never fully dressed without a smile."

                        Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

                        Three things I know for sure: (1) No bad deed goes unrewarded, (2) No good deed goes unpunished, and (3) It is entirely possible to push the most devoted, loyal and caring person beyond the point where they no longer give a 5h!t.

                        Comment

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