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  • ShepXD
    replied
    Originally posted by Matthew5:9 View Post
    I understand that...but out of all the candidates that apply of IL jobs in the metro area...how many of them can enter FTO right off the bat and would only need to meet the following in order to be certified? I.e....(1) mandatory firearms training; (2) Law for Illinois police – 40 hours; and (3) equivalency exam (200 questions).
    I know this has been touched on before, but there are a lot of people trying to lateral around right now.

    I've been trying to switch to a different department for several months now and no luck at all. Being certified helps a little, but don't think you're the only one with prior experience trying to get on. Good luck to you though!

    Leave a comment:


  • Matthew5:9
    replied
    No longer available.
    Last edited by Matthew5:9; 01-28-2011, 02:13 AM.

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  • ChiTownDet
    replied
    Another thing you fail to realize, at least around Chicago, is that the town's Police-Fire Commissions, which are residents of the town, and appointed by the Mayor of that town, tend to favor "local talent" (someone from that muni.,from the area, with ties to that area) over someone from out of the area, and not familiar with that municipality. Not carved in stone, but something to think about. This may play an even bigger part in smaller, rural areas away from Chi. And let's face it, if you go up against the Mayor's nephew, the cousin of a Trustee, or the Police Chief's kid, guess who's getting the job?

    As someone also mentioned, the PD that hires or is hiring you has to request the waiver from the ILETSB. Some smaller places may not even know that they can request the waiver, in which case, it's not the advantage you think it is..

    Another thing that has changed over the last maybe 10 years or so, is that CPD used to be the place many suburban coppers tested for to come over, but with moral being low, unsettled, expired contract, city politics, and residency that isn't true as much anymore. If fact, a lot more that ever, there are CPD leaving for the suburbs.

    Leave a comment:


  • 10-41
    replied
    In my area of southern Ill, our local Sheriff's Dept (St.Clair County) has a pretty large group of Aux. Deputies. Their uniform is exactly the same with the exception of a small patch under the agency patch that states "auxiliary". I think their badge may say it too. St. Clair Co Aux go through a "aux academy" which include the mandatory firearms training. FOr volunteers they are pretty well trained, but not as well as an academy trained officer.

    I believe the AD's here perform the same functions as volunteers everywhere...they work picnics and homecomings for the small towns, parades etc. They also do warrant pick ups and assist on roadblocks and safety checkpoints. Many of the guys and gals will do ride alongs and serve as a back up to the deputy they are riding with.

    The AD in my area are generally very professional and know their boundries. AD tend to get a bad reputation b/c of some bad apples. I think its a great way to get some experience and insight if you are a young person looking to become an LEO. I served as an aux for a local PD before I beacme a FT. Without a doubt I had a headstart on those I went to the acasdemy with.

    Leave a comment:


  • ISPCAPT
    replied
    Originally posted by Matthew5:9 View Post
    Follow my logic for one minute:

    ILLINOIS SCENARIO:
    300 applicants; 200 high school graduates; 90 college grads; and, 10 laterals. Out of the 10 laterals, let's say all of them pass the written exam and are invited to the interviews along with 20 other candidates.
    Where did you get those numbers? They don't follow what I've seen with applicants. A lot more college educated, a lot more laterals, and you left out former military including those with college degrees.
    Your "logic" doesn't follow reality.
    You also need to read the ILETSB website for out of state transfers. The ILETSB does not automatically grant waivers. Whatever agency you're hired at has to request the waiver and how much of a waiver. You don't request the waiver, the agency does.

    Leave a comment:


  • Matthew5:9
    replied
    No longer available.
    Last edited by Matthew5:9; 01-28-2011, 02:13 AM.

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  • The Axolotl
    replied
    lkasjalkdfj

    Actually there are plenty of people who are Illinois certified police officers who are looking for lateral transfers to other Illinois departments. So in essence, no, you are not a unique, colorful butterfly.

    ~

    Leave a comment:


  • Matthew5:9
    replied
    No longer available.
    Last edited by Matthew5:9; 01-28-2011, 02:13 AM.

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  • ShepXD
    replied
    Originally posted by Matthew5:9 View Post
    I think I could wind up getting hired down there much more easily. Minnesota just has way to many candidates; for instance, a recent testing process I went through had 328 people testing for just ONE job.

    Ok I'm done rambling...maybe I'll just troll around the Illinois threads for some job leads...I digress


    I don't know how much you know about Illinois, but 328 people testing for 1 job sounds about par for the course here as well.

    You'll have better odds at towns out in the "sticks", but in the suburban area, competition is fierce!

    Leave a comment:


  • Matthew5:9
    replied
    No longer available.
    Last edited by Matthew5:9; 01-28-2011, 02:12 AM.

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  • rgw1977
    replied
    Yeah, as I stated above with my Link to the Statement of Policy.

    I still believe the law is too vague.

    Most Chiefs wouldn't know how to get their auxiliaries certified. The Board stated they would come out with curricilum similar to the 400 Hours Academy, and that more information would follow - guess what - it ever did. I was a Sgt. in my former dept. when this all started and I remember opening up the letter from the Board. The reason is, they really don't want to train the auxiliaries and they realy want to do away with them.

    It's kinda like the part-time program, it was designed in a manner in which they thought Chief's would just hire already certified people who were full time somewhere else. It didn't quite work out that way and the part-time academy took off like crazy and since it's inceptin, thousands have been through it.

    I've heard that some suburban depts have been sending their auxiliaries through the p/t class at NEMERT to qualify for the conservator of peace status. The problem is, many have then gone and been hired p/t, since it's the same training, and abandoned the dept that spent all of the money to get them through the class.

    Leave a comment:


  • slamdunc
    replied
    Originally posted by rgw1977 View Post
    Illinois needs to change the laws concerning volunteers and get on board with states like California and Indiana, or just simply ban volunteers altogether. It's confusing to those in the profession who are supposed to be able to understand who is who and what they can do and even worse, it is more confusing to the public.
    The law has recently changed; any auxiliary officer with conservator of the peace authority, has to be trained. It is also the responsibility of the agency administrator , to ensure that the auxiliary officer knows his/her role, and limitations.

    Leave a comment:


  • ISPCAPT
    replied
    There was a local sheriff who let his auxiliary "captain" pretty much run loose and no control. He was a wannabee. Their auxiliary wore the exact uniform as the regular except their patch had small "AUX" at the bottom of the patch. The AG got complaints from people and the sheriff was sent a letter from the AG pointing out that their uniforms did not meet the meaning of the statute for being "distinctly different".

    Leave a comment:


  • rgw1977
    replied
    Originally posted by ISPCAPT View Post
    I gave a very brief answer. I didn't mean the uniforms have to be different colors or look completely different than full time. They have to distinctly indicate the person wearing it is an auxiliary as opposed to a regular officer. The patches/insignia on the uniforms have to be different which makes the uniform different. Patches are part of the uniform. They have to be so marked so there is no confusion between auxiliary and regular.
    Before becoming sworn, I volunteered for several years as an auxiliary.

    At one department, the regulars wore dark blue with a six point star. The auxiliaries wore two-tone brown with a shield. It was obvious who we were.

    At the sheriff's department, the regulars wore dark blue, we wore two-tone blue. We both wore seven-point stars and the patches were different but very similar.

    Tha last department I volunteered for, we wore the very same uniform as the regulars. We both wore seven-point stars and the only difference was the wording on the star. We were even armed.

    All depends on the department and the Sheriff's/Chief's interpretation of the statute.

    Illinois needs to change the laws concerning volunteers and get on board with states like California and Indiana, or just simply ban volunteers altogether. It's confusing to those in the profession who are supposed to be able to understand who is who and what they can do and even worse, it is more confusing to the public.

    Leave a comment:


  • rgw1977
    replied
    Originally posted by ShepXD View Post
    What this all boils down to is that it's a convoluted mess in Illinois.

    Ideally, I'd like to see the ILETSB do away with any type of sworn or conservator of the peace status without at least the part-time 400 hour certification. Furthermore, get rid of the 6 month period where they can work before needing to be enrolled in the academy, this will get PT / reserve / volunteer officers off the street who currently get to do police work for up to 6 months without any academy training.
    Yes, it is quite the mess! It seems with many statutes, public acts, whatever, the lawmakers in this state can be so vague and never really come out and be specific with anything, there's always so much room for interpretation.

    And, as far as doing away with the conservator or sworn status, isn't that what they did when they issued this statement concerning auxiliaries in 2006?

    Leave a comment:

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