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Georgia Department of Corrections - Probation Officer

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  • Georgia Department of Corrections - Probation Officer

    Hello Officer.com

    I have a few questions regarding probations in Georgia. I am extremely interested in being a probation officer once I retire from the Army. I have a couple of years left but never too early to get my ducks in a row. I have a college degree from a nationally accredited college. Will this suffice or would they like regional? I was told as long as it is recognized by the Dept. of Education then I will be fine. Which my college is. I just wanted to clarify.

    Also, how is the interview process? Is it quick or will I be waiting for awhile? Last but not least how is the job overall. Iwant to become a PO in the Atlanta area but I'vwe read horror stories of the enormous case loads in the city. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

  • #2
    Ive been a Probation Officer for 3 years now. I actually started in the Atlanta Office, thats the easiest office to get hired in honestly. Any 4 year degree is fine. At the office I work in now we have 2 guys that retired from the Army, and one guy that is in the Army. DOC is military friendly. The interview process isnt too stressful. When I interviewed in Atlanta, I went in, had a panel interview, they called that same day, I had a fit test 2 days later, then about a week later they offered me a job. In the atlanta area the caseloads are high, depending on the type of caseload you have, standard officers have a case load of 400-500 active Probationers, they call in or come to the office to report once a month. High Officers have a caseload on 100-200 but you have to see those probationers in field twice a month and get a collateral contact(talk to a family member or employer). Youll start out as a court officer most likely until you go to BPOT for 9 weeks. On the court team you dont have a case load, your just in court for when ppl get placed on probation, its interesting though seeing and hearing about all the criminal cases, most ppl dont know it but whenever a person is sentenced there is always a GDC Probation Officer in the courtroom, because even if they dont get probation, they may get prison time and we handle that part too. Yes the caseloads are huge, but you do what you can, there are ways to get the job done.

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    • #3
      Thank you so much for your reply.

      What sort of questions were asked during the interview? Was it more related to yourself or knowledge of probation operations?

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      • #4
        LBClark81 most questions I have been asked is mostly related to yourself with maybe one or two directed toward probation but nothing to crazy. (For example can you handle a caseload that might be between 200-300 probationers?)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by AwesomePOII View Post
          Ive been a Probation Officer for 3 years now. I actually started in the Atlanta Office, thats the easiest office to get hired in honestly. Any 4 year degree is fine. At the office I work in now we have 2 guys that retired from the Army, and one guy that is in the Army. DOC is military friendly. The interview process isnt too stressful. When I interviewed in Atlanta, I went in, had a panel interview, they called that same day, I had a fit test 2 days later, then about a week later they offered me a job. In the atlanta area the caseloads are high, depending on the type of caseload you have, standard officers have a case load of 400-500 active Probationers, they call in or come to the office to report once a month. High Officers have a caseload on 100-200 but you have to see those probationers in field twice a month and get a collateral contact(talk to a family member or employer). Youll start out as a court officer most likely until you go to BPOT for 9 weeks. On the court team you dont have a case load, your just in court for when ppl get placed on probation, its interesting though seeing and hearing about all the criminal cases, most ppl dont know it but whenever a person is sentenced there is always a GDC Probation Officer in the courtroom, because even if they dont get probation, they may get prison time and we handle that part too. Yes the caseloads are huge, but you do what you can, there are ways to get the job done.

          Hey I been processing with several offices in GA I just wanted to know what is a typical day for you? Also I'm not in it for the money but how do raises work? Yearly? Budget? Longevity? just curious.

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          • #6
            I honestly cant remember the interview questions, but i know some questions were asking what you would do in certain situations etc. As far as my typical day. I go in check my email, go check the jail list to see if any of my probationers got arrested, if so and they are still in jail i place a hold on them, if they have been released, depending on what the charge is, I will call them in and take them back to jail. I check my voicemails, call probationers to get reports. Theres really no typical day, a number of things happen throughout the day. Probationers come in for drug testing, you may have to take one to jail. Raises are rare with the state, you get your starting pay, then after 18 months i think you go up to pay rate for a POII, then after that a raise is wishful thinking unless you move up a position.

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            • #7
              Also, how is BPOT? What is a typical day there? It the course strenuous or nothing too crazy. I'm thinking it is just self defense type stuff and of course how to do the paperwork side of the house.

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              • #8
                BPOT is nothing thats very hard, first 2 weeks I think we are mostly on the range, then for a week you learn about court etiquette, learn about the computer system we use, I think that last week it Defensive Tactics you get sprayed etc...BPOT really just gets you Post Certified, it doesnt show you the specifics of how to do actual Probation work if that makes sense, you will learn that in the office while waiting to go and after you get back. Every circuit is different in how they want things done. We were there mon-fri, had to be in the room by 10, lights out by 11. Had to get up at 5am for PT, go do that, then try to beat the extremely large BCOT class to breakfast, then get back, and rush to shower because 6 ppl share one shower, then get dressed and be back to class by 8. When you go, it may be more strict or it may not be.

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                • #9
                  Awesome! Thanks, such a huge help. I haven't really been able to get a lot of info on GDC Probations on the net but you have helped greatly. Thanks again!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AwesomePOII View Post
                    BPOT is nothing thats very hard, first 2 weeks I think we are mostly on the range, then for a week you learn about court etiquette, learn about the computer system we use, I think that last week it Defensive Tactics you get sprayed etc...BPOT really just gets you Post Certified, it doesnt show you the specifics of how to do actual Probation work if that makes sense, you will learn that in the office while waiting to go and after you get back. Every circuit is different in how they want things done. We were there mon-fri, had to be in the room by 10, lights out by 11. Had to get up at 5am for PT, go do that, then try to beat the extremely large BCOT class to breakfast, then get back, and rush to shower because 6 ppl share one shower, then get dressed and be back to class by 8. When you go, it may be more strict or it may not be.
                    I'm helping my wife train so she can meet the time requirements for the mile run. She is freaking out about having to pt. I'm trying to make her more confident. Can you tell me what kind of exercises were done during pt ?

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                    • #11
                      Well I'm current active duty military and I can provide a little insight on running. Sprints help with endurance during a run. If you take her to a track and have her sprint the strait away and walk the curves for your first few times. After a while move up to sprinting the straits and jogging the curves. She will be able to run the mile in no time. 4 laps in 18 mins i believe is the standard for GDC if im not mistaken. If she practices she'll be fine. Only way to get better at running is to run.

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                      • #12
                        Excercises that were done during PT, nothing extremly difficult. Push ups, sit ups, leg raises, hello dollies, jumping jacks, sprints, running. People of ALL ages and sizes are PO's, your wife should be confident, once youre hired, you wont get kicked out of BPOT of not being able to complete the excercises, long as youre trying, youll be okay. The only way ppl get sent home that ive seen is from the weapons qualification, you have to qualify twice. But you get plenty of practice.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Probation

                          Originally posted by LBClark81 View Post
                          Hello Officer.com

                          I have a few questions regarding probations in Georgia. I am extremely interested in being a probation officer once I retire from the Army. I have a couple of years left but never too early to get my ducks in a row. I have a college degree from a nationally accredited college. Will this suffice or would they like regional? I was told as long as it is recognized by the Dept. of Education then I will be fine. Which my college is. I just wanted to clarify.

                          Also, how is the interview process? Is it quick or will I be waiting for awhile? Last but not least how is the job overall. Iwant to become a PO in the Atlanta area but I'vwe read horror stories of the enormous case loads in the city. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
                          I am also a GA probation officer in the metro area. I love my job, the caseloads are all very large, but it keeps me very busy and the time goes by very fast. Being a probation officer is a very stressful job, but you can really have an impact in people's lives. The best part is you are not always in the office, you will sometimes be out in the field or at court. The only complaint I have is the pay could be better considering you must have a college degree to be eligible. The hiring process can take anywhere from 6 weeks to 3 months depending on where you apply and how badly they need positions filled. It is important to have a clean background or you will not get hired. GDC looks carefully at criminal history and driving history just like any police department would. We are just as critical in hiring as police departments in my opinion.

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