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  • Fitness suggestions for Acad.

    Ok. So I am trying to get into LE any way I can. But I am not in fantastic shape. I could lose about 30 pounds (Got about 20 off since April) but I am a big guy 6'1 barrel chested and like to lift weights.

    Im trying to get a good program going that will ensure that I get into top shape for my job, and for myself as well. Im not sure what type of fit is the best for the academy. I am not a natural runner type.

    Just to show that im not some fat guy complaining about eating too many donuts:

    I weighed 315 Lbs. (about 5'9-10) in High School. Lost a lot of it before college. In AFROTC my 2nd year I got from 235 to 200. I went from a 16 minute mile and a half to 10:15 in 2 semesters - it was REALLY hard work for me, 5 days a week PT and ...salads and tuna... but then I left that and joined a Fraternity.... you can guess the rest.

    So Id like to know what many of you fellow Georgians do to make sure your fitness and waistline stay where you want them to be. Or even better, any stories/suggestions about your battles with bulge.

    I understand that the fitness section would be ideal, however I hold much more weight with the opinions of folks from round' here. Knyuk knyuk knyuk.
    Graduate of Athens Regional Police Academy - 235th BLETC

  • #2
    learn about the glycemic index.

    join a martial arts program

    take some of those classes at the gym with the hot girls in them
    Any views or opinions presented by this prenomen are solely those of a burlesque author and do not necessarily represent those of a LEA or caementum couturier.

    nom de plume

    This is the internet- take all information with a grain of salt. Such could be valid and true or could be typed just for playing devils advocate.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by DJKAHUNA View Post
      Ok. So I am trying to get into LE any way I can. But I am not in fantastic shape. I could lose about 30 pounds (Got about 20 off since April) but I am a big guy 6'1 barrel chested and like to lift weights.

      Im trying to get a good program going that will ensure that I get into top shape for my job, and for myself as well. Im not sure what type of fit is the best for the academy. I am not a natural runner type.

      Just to show that im not some fat guy complaining about eating too many donuts:

      I weighed 315 Lbs. (about 5'9-10) in High School. Lost a lot of it before college. In AFROTC my 2nd year I got from 235 to 200. I went from a 16 minute mile and a half to 10:15 in 2 semesters - it was REALLY hard work for me, 5 days a week PT and ...salads and tuna... but then I left that and joined a Fraternity.... you can guess the rest.

      So Id like to know what many of you fellow Georgians do to make sure your fitness and waistline stay where you want them to be. Or even better, any stories/suggestions about your battles with bulge.

      I understand that the fitness section would be ideal, however I hold much more weight with the opinions of folks from round' here. Knyuk knyuk knyuk.

      Diet, Diet, Diet. My recommendation is a less than 2,000 calorie a day diet. Lots of chicken/fish/turkey and green leafy vegetables (spinach, broccoli, etc). Drink lots of water and stay away from soda, diet drinks, etc. Snack on Low fat yogurt, fruit, nuts, and get a good whey protein supplement. Try to eat every 3-4 hours, but eat small meals. Eating before bed is debatable. Some say no nothing, others say no carbs, some say no big deal if it is a healthy snack (cottage cheese, yogurt, etc). I eat a little cottage cheese before bed.

      Get on a good cardio routine. Couch to 5k is an excellent program...
      http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml

      The weight will start falling off if you change your diet. Drastic diet changes can be hard. The key is to keep your blood sugar up and don't starve yourself. Also, work a splurge day in once a week. It will keep you honest the rest of the week.
      Last edited by miked6; 09-30-2009, 06:42 PM.
      "Would I ever leave this company? Look, I'm all about loyalty. In fact, I feel like part of what I'm being paid for here is my loyalty. But if there were somewhere else that valued loyalty more highly, I'm going wherever they value loyalty the most. " --Dwight K Schrute (The Office)

      Comment


      • #4
        I started this running program back in July and I have improved a lot.
        This program by Stew Smith. Most anyone can tell you about him. Finish The Drill.

        Running for ALL Levels of Fitness
        With the weather getting nicer around the country, people are seeking to start a running program and getting motivated to do so. But motivation can quickly turn painful if you do TOO much TOO soon. Below are a few charts for you to build up to a 5K run/walk to a Marathon over the course of several weeks depending on your present ability.

        My personal rule for clients who request training plans for running for long races is to take your time and build up to nearly 25-30 miles a week before you really start concerning yourself with improving your performance in the long run like a half marathon or marathon. This alone can take anywhere from 10-15 weeks depending upon your present running level. The standard rule of ramping up your running is adding 10-15% of distance per week.

        The first TEN weeks are designed for a beginning runner or one who is recovering from an injury as seen in the chart below:

        Running Plan I - Build up to a 5K run!

        Beginner Running Chart for people seeking to start an exercise plan and need to lose 20+ lbs: (always start run workout with a quick 5:00 walk / light leg stretch). I highly recommend the RUN / WALK method as you are learning to run.
        Each Run Workout is to be done THREE times a week
        Week 1 Walk 20-30 minutes / stretching entire body daily (monitor weight loss*)
        Week 2 Run 1:00 / Walk 1-2:00 for 20-30 minutes
        Week 3 Run 1:00 / Walk 1:00 for 30 minutes (listen body as injuries occur this week**)
        Week 4 3 Sets of Run 1:30 / Walk 1:30 | 3 Sets of Run 2:00 / Walk 1:00
        Week 5 3 Sets of Run 2:30 / Walk 1:00 | 3 Sets of Run 2:00 / Walk 30 seconds
        Week 6 4 Sets of Run 3:00 / Walk 1:30
        Week 7 Run 1 mile / try non-stop / walk 1 mile fast
        Week 8 Run / walk combo 2.5 miles (from weeks 8-10 try to run as much as you can)
        Week 9 Run / walk combo 2.75 miles
        Week10 Run / walk combo 3 miles

        Running Plan II - Intermediate Runners - Build up to a 10K run:
        After starting a running plan, often people get injured after continuing past the 3 mile run point. Add some non impact aerobic options in the plan of the week to help alleviate future pains. See running injures article at www.stewsmith.com/linkpages/runningarticles.htm
        Wk Mon Tues Weds Thurs Friay Saturday
        1 1-2 mile Bike or swim 1-2 mile Bike or swim 1-2 miles 1-2 mile
        2 2-3 miles Bike or swim 2-3 miles Bike or swim 2-3 miles 2-3 miles
        3* 3 miles Bike or swim 3 miles Bike or swim 3 miles 3 miles
        4 2 miles 3 miles off 4 miles 4 miles 5 miles
        5 2-3 miles 6 miles off 4-5 miles Off 6 miles
        6 3 miles 4 miles 5 miles off off 10 k

        The following nine weeks will take you to a level where you can seriously start to train for a 10 miler, half marathon or marathon without risk of serious injury. Just climbing to this level of running could cause tendonitis and other joint pains due to the harshness of running on the body. (FACT - 30-60% of all runners get injured every year - Runner's World). It is NOT recommended to start Running Plan III until you can perform week six from the Running Plan II.

        Running Plan III - Intermediate / Advanced Runners - Build up to 10 - 13 miles

        Wk Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
        1 4 miles 5 miles off 3 miles 4 miles 6 miles off
        2 5 miles 4 miles off 6 miles 4 miles 6 miles off
        3 5 miles 4 miles off 6 miles 4 miles 6 miles off
        4 6 miles 4 miles off 6 miles 4 miles 6 miles off
        5 7 miles 4 miles off 6 miles 4 miles 7 miles off
        6 8 miles 4 miles off 6 miles 4 miles 8 miles off
        7 8 miles 4 miles off 7 miles off 9 miles off
        8 8 miles 4 miles off 8 miles off 10 - 11 miles off
        9 9 miles 4 miles off 8 miles off 10-13 miles EVENT

        *Work on speed and goal pace during above workout (minutes/mile).
        ** ON Tuesday and Friday add in leg workouts with short runs to total a 4 mile workout:
        Option #1 Option #2 Option #3
        Run 1 mile warmup
        Repeat 8 times
        Run at goal pace
        rest with 10 squats
        and 10 lunges / leg
        Run 1 mile cooldown / stretch Run 1 mile at goal pace
        Repeat 4 times
        Run mile at goal pace
        rest with 20 squats
        10 / lunges per leg
        Run 1 mile cooldown Run or bike 5 minutes
        Repeat 4-6 times
        Run or bike 5 minutes
        Leg press - 10-20 reps
        Wood chopper Squats 20
        squats - 20
        WC Lunges 10/leg
        side step squats - 20


        Once you have the foundation of running thirty miles per week under your belt, you are now ready to train at your goal mile time and distance for a faster marathon. Usually Saturday and Sunday make the best days for your longer run so Monday and Friday will be off days in order to recover and prepare. The chart below is a 12 week plan for a Marathon:

        12 Week Running Plan for Better Marathon Performance - Very Advanced Runners

        Wk Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
        1 off 8 miles 5 miles 6 miles off 6 miles 6 miles
        2 off 8 miles 6 miles 6 miles off 7 miles 7 miles
        3 off 9 miles 6 miles 6 miles off 8 miles 8 miles
        4 off 9 miles 6 miles 6 miles off 10 miles 6 miles
        5 off 10 miles 6 miles 6 miles off 12 miles 6 miles
        6 off 11 miles 6 miles 6 miles off 14 miles 6 miles
        7 off 12 miles 6 miles 6 miles off 16 miles 6 miles
        8 off 12 miles 6 miles 6 miles off 18 miles 6 miles
        9 off 12 miles 6 miles 6 miles off 19 miles 6 miles
        10 off 10 miles 6 miles 6 miles off 20 miles 6 miles
        11 off 8 miles 6 miles 6 miles off 10 miles 6 miles
        12 off 6 miles 6 miles off off 2 miles marathon


        Goal paces
        10:00 / mile = approx. 4.5 hours
        9:00 / mile = approx. 4 hours
        8:00 / mile = approx. 3.5 hours
        7:00 / mile = approx. 3 hours
        6:00 / mile = approx. 2.5 hours

        These workouts are recommended running programs that have worked in the past for many people, but they may not be right for you. Check with your doctor prior to starting any exercise routine (especially running) or you may find yourself reading the articles in the StewSmith.com Archives about Lower Back or Knee Injuries.

        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Stew Smith is a former Navy SEAL and fitness author certified as a Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) with the National Strength and Conditioning Association.





        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Prepare for Obstacle Courses without One!!

        Many pre- military and law enforcement recruits who are training for their future training programs often are hit with this problem of not having an obstacle course to train with before departing. Here is an email from a trainee seeking advice on how to pre-train for this issue:

        I do not have access to an o-course, but would really like to be able to train on one, or at least train a workout that has some carryover to something like the bud/s o-course or the USMC confidence course. Any ideas? Thanks very much.

        All obstacle courses have high and low obstacles and usually some distance to run in between them. Here is how I recommend training for such a test:

        1 - Continue with upperbody strength / endurance workouts - You need the muscles that enable you to perform a pullup, pushup, and dip. Keep doing those in a regular program in your PT workouts. If you are not doing these exercises here is a sample plan:

        Repeat 5-10 times
        Run 100m fast
        Pushups - 10-20 reps
        Pullups or flexed arm hang - 15-20 seconds worth
        Dips or bench dips - 10-20 reps

        This type of quick circuit will ensure you are working the right muscles that will help you get over a wall, up a rope, and over a fence. Notice the short fast 100m sprint in this workout. This addition will help you cover ground quickly and make up valuable time if you are struggling with any obstacles.

        2 - GRIP - climbing a rope or jumping over a wall will require significant upperbody strength but it will also require you to be able to grip a rope or wall edge as well. Once again, flexed arm hangs and pull-ups will help to a degree, but I like to add a piece of rope or rolled towel over a pullup bar and practice hanging on the two ends or even doing pull-ups with it. That is one of the best grip workouts ever. In fact, on the strong man competitions, often they have the worlds strongest men hang from a bar the longest as a part of the event.

        3 - Balance - find a curb or long beam you are walk across / run across to practice balance on a log as many obstacle courses have a balance portion. A trick I always use is to look at the end of the balance beam and run to it. Do not look straight down as that can interfere with your ability to stay on the balance log.

        Weights or Calisthenics - Many people ask me what they should use to prepare for military or law enforcement training programs. I always recommend to do a calisthenics based program complete with plenty of cardio activity like running, swimming, biking to increase your endurance and muscle stamina. However, I do like to supplement the workouts with some weights IF you must lift weights, but any of these programs will not have significant weight lifting in them. This is mainly a logistical issue as large recruit classes are difficult to run through real weight lifting programs in a gym. As a former powerlifter, I understand the urge to lift, but do yourself a favor and while you are pre-training just PT and run with some weights to balance your training.

        Put it this way, no 400 lb bench press is going to get you over a wall or up a rope!

        Comment


        • #5
          I have been doing P90X and dropping weight quickly. I am also running at least a mile a day.

          Comment


          • #6
            Wow - thanks for the suggestions.

            I got a treadmill and an exercise bike, full olympic and standard weight sets - and a nice road through the woods to a boat ramp right near my house.

            Im def gonna take on some of the running programs. Those look fantastic.

            I can still run over 1 mile without stopping, so the week 7 looks like a good place to start.

            I have also heard great things about P90X. A friend of mine who was a complete lazy fat bum decided the wanted to join the Army and has been losing weight fairly quick with P90X and diet. Its been making me look for it on ebay or craigslist for cheap cheap.

            And im shifting focus from heavy weights to more rep lighter weight.

            Thanks again.
            Last edited by DJKAHUNA; 10-01-2009, 02:47 PM.
            Graduate of Athens Regional Police Academy - 235th BLETC

            Comment


            • #7
              So I got my exercise bike fixed and did 30min / 30min along with my treadmill.

              Later today I will hit up the free weights, and I got a pull up bar.

              Im thinking about getting p90X - 90 days is about what I got till Acad hopefully, and the folks I know who got it are getting great results, and more importantly, having fun.

              In a few weeks I'll start heading to the local track for timing and pacing.
              Graduate of Athens Regional Police Academy - 235th BLETC

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DJKAHUNA View Post

                And im shifting focus from heavy weights to more rep lighter weight.


                Heavy weights can still be utilized. 2-3 good heavy compound sets will stimulate the CNS and endocrine systems. You do not have to do a complete hour of weight lifting with the heavy weights but a few simple heavy sets will help overall fitness.
                Any views or opinions presented by this prenomen are solely those of a burlesque author and do not necessarily represent those of a LEA or caementum couturier.

                nom de plume

                This is the internet- take all information with a grain of salt. Such could be valid and true or could be typed just for playing devils advocate.

                Comment

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