Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Florida giving up property taxes what does it mean to us

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Florida giving up property taxes what does it mean to us

    I have heard about property taxes being axed in FL so what does this mean to us.

    It might help some departments where the tax base is not high and they can use some money, but what about us large departments that have to worry now because the state is in charge of how much money we get.

    FYI the state legislators dont like the Police too much, just look how they do FHP on raises.
    Last edited by LATIN COP; 04-07-2007, 08:08 PM.

  • #2
    do your reports read this clearly too?
    "In a bacon-and-egg breakfast, the chicken is involved, but the pig is committed." - Brian Billick

    Be that pig.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by dogma vs karma
      do your reports read this clearly too?
      The day I really care about my spelling and grammer on Ofc.com will be the day I have nothing better to do in life or I must be a rookie. that must explain it. Y el dia que tu puedes hablar dos lenguahes y tener la gramatica perfecto con los dos lenguahes duespes puedes hablar, Rookie

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by LATIN COP
        The day I really care about my spelling and grammer on Ofc.com will be the day I have nothing better to do in life or I must be a rookie. that must explain it. Y el dia que tu puedes hablar dos lenguahes y tener la gramatica perfecto con los dos lenguahes duespes puedes hablar, Rookie

        How do you know that he doesn't? Not saying he does, but you're getting a bit judgemental there aren't ya?

        Comment


        • #5
          Oh and for the original post, the plan (if it happens), is to get rid of property tax and add a certain amount to sales tax (maybe another cent?). The extra sales tax would go for the same things the property tax goes to.

          Comment


          • #6
            it was sarcasm originally. but your edited version READS clearly.
            (unconcerned about spelling/grammar, as mine is not perfect)

            the tax idea is great.
            if you own a home, then you seem to get raped in every state.
            people need to live somewhere.

            sales tax on the other hand is mostly on items that are non essential.
            IE; a luxury tax (ref: see monopoly board game).

            the biggest concern, and i can see where latin is going with this, is the disbursement of funds.
            will local cities now get shafted, or is this really for the better?

            i guess that we won't know until the plan is more laid out.
            "In a bacon-and-egg breakfast, the chicken is involved, but the pig is committed." - Brian Billick

            Be that pig.

            Comment


            • #7
              gosh this is america, please speak english.

              Thanks in advance,
              soflacop

              Comment


              • #8
                Below is some info from the newspapers:

                "It is part of a controversial property-tax package that Marco Rubio, R-West Miami, unveiled last month that also seeks to eliminate all property taxes on homesteaded property in exchange for adding 2.5 cents to the state sales tax. That would lift the sales tax to 8.5 cents per dollar."
                Orlando Sentinel

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yay! More state tax!
                  "Our citizenship in the United States is our national character...Our great title is AMERICANS." - Thomas Paine

                  "The bitterest tears shed over graves are for words left unsaid and deeds left undone." - Harriet Beecher Stowe

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This is what it means.


                    The Legislature is considering options that could result in reductions of 20-30% of the funds used by our local communities to fund the Sheriff's operations, emergency medical, fire services and our critical public safety infrastructure.

                    Remembering that personnel costs are the majority of the Sheriffs budget, reductions of this magnitude will most certainly result in personnel reductions including Deputy Sheriffs and support personnel.

                    Cut backs will necessarily touch all programs and services including crime prevention, school resource deputies, patrol operations, traffic enforcement and juvenile crime prevention initiatives.
                    sigpic

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Evil Cartman
                      This is what it means.


                      The Legislature is considering options that could result in reductions of 20-30% of the funds used by our local communities to fund the Sheriff's operations, emergency medical, fire services and our critical public safety infrastructure.

                      Remembering that personnel costs are the majority of the Sheriffs budget, reductions of this magnitude will most certainly result in personnel reductions including Deputy Sheriffs and support personnel.

                      Cut backs will necessarily touch all programs and services including crime prevention, school resource deputies, patrol operations, traffic enforcement and juvenile crime prevention initiatives.

                      How does the Sheriff Dept get most effected and not the citys.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        budget wise, he may have to tighten his belt......


                        road patrol : less detectives / more uniformed patrol

                        jail: : already short staffed, under funded


                        court: prisoners gotta go to and from court
                        deputy sheriff's must attend all court seessions
                        civil process may be delayed / farmed to process servers
                        " if you talk in your sleep, don't mention my name....
                        " if you walk in your sleep, forget where you came....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          City services will be affected also.

                          Police, Fire and EMS.

                          Road and bridge services and more.

                          It’s not just the sheriff’s offices.

                          FHP, FDOT and more....

                          Still researching....
                          sigpic

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Daytona Beach
                            News-Journal Online

                            April 04, 2007

                            Tax reform might hurt hometowns

                            Cities brace to provide services with less money

                            By EILEEN ZAFFIRO and KARI COBHAM
                            Staff Writers
                            A year or two from now, you could be bouncing over more potholes, seeing city buildings screaming for repairs and wondering why fewer police cars are on the roads.

                            If you're living in an apartment or your first house, you're going to be especially perplexed if you see your property taxes climbing even as city services are dwindling.

                            That's a likely scenario throughout Florida if the deep property tax cuts being threatened in Tallahassee become reality, local government officials warn.

                            Proposals flying around the Capitol would roll back property tax collections for cities and counties to pre-real estate boom levels -- while expenses remain at current levels. Though it's unclear what, if anything, will happen before the legislative session ends in May, the talk has been enough to compel some cities to scramble for contingency plans should they have to live with less -- a lot less.

                            "It's a disaster," said state Rep. Joyce Cusack, a Democrat from DeLand who's battling against current tax reform proposals. "It's like a ship full of holes that's sinking fast. There's no universal formula to implement the plan. It doesn't say how to make up the revenue local governments lose. It's a mess."

                            But some state lawmakers say local government has become bloated on soaring property tax revenues. State Sen. Evelyn Lynn contends the doomsday predictions are exaggerations.

                            "They have many, many other sources of revenue they could turn to if they needed to," said Lynn, a Republican from Ormond Beach who's sponsoring a bill that limits local government tax increases. "We all have to pull in our budgets in our own homes. People get second jobs."

                            The steps being taken in two local cities may be indicative of what local governments throughout the state will be facing if the legislative proposals are adopted.

                            DeLand, for example, is bracing for some tough decisions. All city departments have already cut a hypothetical 11 percent from their 2006-2007 budgets in anticipation of the worst-case tax reform scenario that could leave the city up to $2 million poorer.

                            "This isn't nickel-and-dime stuff," said Finance Director Kevin Lewis.

                            Cuts could mean losing more than 17 jobs, including an officer from the already understaffed Police Department and six firefighter positions, according to a memo from the city. They also foresee eliminating the Little League fall season, charging for fire emergency response to accidents, shutting down a fire station and even closing City Hall one day a week.
                            "I don't think citizens are aware of the seriousness of what they're discussing" in Tallahassee, said DeLand City Manager Mike Abels.

                            Kelly McGuire, Ormond Beach's budget director, has a little heartburn over the $5 million her city could lose.

                            "It's unheard of. There'll be a huge impact," McGuire said.

                            Ormond Beach's finance director, Paul Lane, isn't convinced the sky is falling. Not yet, anyway. He thinks the tax cap plans could fizzle, at least for the budget year that begins Oct. 1.

                            "There's not enough time," Lane said. "I think it was way too drastic and they're trying to move too quickly. And they're not dealing with equity."

                            If cuts have to be made, Ormond Beach City Commissioner Bill Partington prefers across-the-board budget reductions to the 115 layoffs top staff is suggesting.

                            "I want to do everything possible not to lose any employees," Partington said.

                            Ormond Beach City Commissioner Ed Kelley thinks it might be necessary to lay off employees, as well as reduce services.

                            "I see a doom-and-gloom situation if the state does this without fixing the tax system," Kelley said.

                            Palm Coast could see its budget cut by as much as one-third, under what Ray Britt, the city's director of general services, calls the "worst-case scenario."

                            The loss of that much revenue would cripple city services. In fact, Britt estimates that the city would barely have enough money to cover essential services like the Fire Department and public works.
                            Layoffs would be likely in the city's finance, human resources and other support staff offices to prevent mandatory services like the Fire Department from being affected, Britt said.

                            Projects like paving city roads could also be cut, said Councilwoman Mary DiStefano.

                            "Your staffing would be decreased because the services couldn't be delivered," she said.

                            But Britt doesn't see it coming to that.

                            "I don't see it really having a dramatic impact, unless the Legislature does something really ridiculous," he said.

                            [email protected]

                            [email protected]
                            sigpic

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              This could hurt everyone!!!!
                              sigpic

                              Comment

                              MR300x250 Tablet

                              Collapse

                              What's Going On

                              Collapse

                              There are currently 6235 users online. 346 members and 5889 guests.

                              Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                              Welcome Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X