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Personal information required on a HOA application.

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  • sgt jon
    replied
    Originally posted by Delta_V View Post
    Don't give them your SSN or DL number. The HOA does not have a legitimate reason to collect your SSN, as they aren't a bank, creditor, public utility, etc. If they really press the issue then you might end up having to contact a lawyer to send them a letter, but in the end if they want your SSN they will have to prove that they're entitled to have it. The laws governing HOAs are written giving much of the benefit to the homeowner just like much of the landlord/tenant law benefits the tenant. If the HOA tries to do something that they're not allowed to do and get taken to court they're going to have to pay up big time.
    Spot on advice.

    There are federal and state laws that mandate disclosure of your SSAN (or indicate consequences of not providing it; such as delays and such, but in most cases, service cannot be denied solely for failure to disclose) when the activity is tied to government funded programs; however your disclosure to private entities is completely voluntary. Granted, failure to disclose it does present hurdles to obtaining credit and in some cases services because SSANs are used industry-wide as unique identifiers. While they can simply refuse to do business with you, there is usually a remedy found in the generation of a unique identification number (UIN).

    Have a look at a relevant GAO report on the subject: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d051016t.pdf

    Simply put, unless there is a statutory requirement that I provide my SSAN to a government entity, and one that also includes provisions for its protection, I will not provide it.

    Leave a comment:


  • jannino
    replied
    They only want to get your SSN so they can try to make you personally responsible for the dues.

    Leave a comment:


  • tdog
    replied
    I have a question sorry I am confused. I am new to all of this. I currently live in an apartment and am looking at purchasing a townhome. Is a Home-owners Association the same as a townhome association because I see HOA's mostly associated with Condo's but not townhomes. Maybe I'm looking in the wrong areas.

    I live with my g/f and she would be moving with me. I am getting the loan on my own, putting everything in my name only. Would she have to apply with the townhome association as well since she would be living with me?

    What information would they be asking of me? Thanks for any an all responses.

    Leave a comment:


  • vaticanassassin
    replied
    I sit on the Board of the HOA at my Townhomes.... They dont need the personal information... but if you have it is easier to process a lien if needed!

    Leave a comment:


  • Delta_V
    replied
    Don't give them your SSN or DL number. The HOA does not have a legitimate reason to collect your SSN, as they aren't a bank, creditor, public utility, etc. If they really press the issue then you might end up having to contact a lawyer to send them a letter, but in the end if they want your SSN they will have to prove that they're entitled to have it. The laws governing HOAs are written giving much of the benefit to the homeowner just like much of the landlord/tenant law benefits the tenant. If the HOA tries to do something that they're not allowed to do and get taken to court they're going to have to pay up big time.

    As to HOAs putting liens on property, it happens for non-payment of dues but they are not allowed to put a lien on your property for not paying fines or other HOA fees. They only can lien your property for dues payments. Considering that 99% of the foreclosures out there are behind in all their payments, there are liens from the HOA, the county tax collector, and the mortgage company. For this reason a lot of HOAs aren't even filing liens right now, as filing the lien costs money and there's no guarantee when the property sells that they'll get the money since the property isn't going to be worth the sum of all the liens.

    If you read the HOA documents and can live with the deed restrictions, a neighborhood with a HOA is actually a good place to be. Property values are generally higher in neighborhoods with HOAs, which will help your resale value. You also don't have to worry about your neighbor painting his house purple and leaving his rusted out old pickup truck on blocks in his front lawn.

    Leave a comment:


  • five0686
    replied
    Originally posted by coponpatrol View Post
    Are you buying the home from the HOA? If not, the bank or mortgage company gets your info. There is no reasonable reason for the HOA to have it. Even if they are acting on their own without a management company directing them. Owning a home in a HOA/deed restricted development requires you to be a member so I don't see why you have to "apply" to be one.

    Further, I have not heard of a HOA asking for that type of info. I was the HOA president for 3 years and the only thing we had the owners do (not required though) was to give us an email address so we could pass information on to them without spending money for postage. Our management company had a list of the owners names and anything related to the homes we could get from the County deeds or city clerks office.

    What I think is going on here is they are covering all means of having enough info on you so that if for some reason they need to file a court action or lawsuit against you in the future, they won't have to pay an investigation company to get what's needed.

    One poster stated they can foreclose or put a lien on the home. That's true but in these economic conditions HOA's are strongly advised not to do it because they become the owner and if the house can't sell, they have to do the maintenance and the balance of the mortgage becomes a liability to them. As far as the liens, judges are now looking at the severeness of why a lien was applied for. In most cases they will not allow HOA's to take a home from the owner for HOA violations or even non payment of dues.

    Personally, I wouldn't give them anything but your name, and soon to be new address, and maybe if they are lucky, your former address. If you have a take home car they are going to know you are the Po-Po. Get ready for the "can you do this for us', or can you get those people to stop doing..." you know how it is, you become the go to person.

    Good luck and I hope you and your wife enjoy the new digs.
    Thank you, good info. Now I'm feeling better buying this home.

    Leave a comment:


  • coponpatrol
    replied
    Are you buying the home from the HOA? If not, the bank or mortgage company gets your info. There is no reasonable reason for the HOA to have it. Even if they are acting on their own without a management company directing them. Owning a home in a HOA/deed restricted development requires you to be a member so I don't see why you have to "apply" to be one.

    Further, I have not heard of a HOA asking for that type of info. I was the HOA president for 3 years and the only thing we had the owners do (not required though) was to give us an email address so we could pass information on to them without spending money for postage. Our management company had a list of the owners names and anything related to the homes we could get from the County deeds or city clerks office.

    What I think is going on here is they are covering all means of having enough info on you so that if for some reason they need to file a court action or lawsuit against you in the future, they won't have to pay an investigation company to get what's needed.

    One poster stated they can foreclose or put a lien on the home. That's true but in these economic conditions HOA's are strongly advised not to do it because they become the owner and if the house can't sell, they have to do the maintenance and the balance of the mortgage becomes a liability to them. As far as the liens, judges are now looking at the severeness of why a lien was applied for. In most cases they will not allow HOA's to take a home from the owner for HOA violations or even non payment of dues.

    Personally, I wouldn't give them anything but your name, and soon to be new address, and maybe if they are lucky, your former address. If you have a take home car they are going to know you are the Po-Po. Get ready for the "can you do this for us', or can you get those people to stop doing..." you know how it is, you become the go to person.

    Good luck and I hope you and your wife enjoy the new digs.

    Leave a comment:


  • five0686
    replied
    Originally posted by conesweeper View Post
    I was amazed to see the amount of HOA communities there are in South Florida
    Basically every home built after the late 80's in south Florida have HOAs.

    Leave a comment:


  • five0686
    replied
    Originally posted by sibpd893tf View Post
    Contact the Condominium Ombudsman who is located in Fort Lauderdale. They will provide you with answers to all your legal questions about what information the Association can require from an owner.
    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • conesweeper
    replied
    I was amazed to see the amount of HOA communities there are in South Florida

    Leave a comment:


  • sibpd893tf
    replied
    Contact the Condominium Ombudsman who is located in Fort Lauderdale. They will provide you with answers to all your legal questions about what information the Association can require from an owner.

    Leave a comment:


  • GIOSTORMUSNRET
    replied
    Originally posted by five0686 View Post
    I did. The reason we are buying this home, the seller is paying half of the closing costs. I know about HOA nightmares, also I planning to be active member in the association to keep them in check. Also I'm not to planning fall behind in payments.
    No one plans on falling behind, one guy had his house foreclosed on due to unforeseen medical bills from wife's illness. No one plans on things that eat your savings account, it's just a hazard that might crop up.

    Leave a comment:


  • Department 30
    replied
    I agree. Like I said, I would play up your job a bit. That should help, as it is a legitimate reason.

    Leave a comment:


  • five0686
    replied
    Originally posted by GIOSTORMUSNRET View Post
    you don't want to buy a house in a community that has a HOA. HOA can file a lean against your house if you don't pay the HOA monthly fee, and foreclose on it too, which is not included in the mortgage. Do some research about HOA nightmares.
    I did. The reason we are buying this home, the seller is paying half of the closing costs. I know about HOA nightmares, also I planning to be active member in the association to keep them in check. Also I'm not to planning fall behind in payments.

    Leave a comment:


  • GIOSTORMUSNRET
    replied
    you don't want to buy a house in a community that has a HOA. HOA can file a lean against your house if you don't pay the HOA monthly fee, and foreclose on it too, which is not included in the mortgage. Do some research about HOA nightmares.

    Leave a comment:

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