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Alameda county sheriff acadamy

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  • Alameda county sheriff acadamy

    Just curious if anyone is familiar with this academy? Been through it, heard anything about it, going to it etc.? Ive read a few blogs online from years ago, but nothing recent. I know some departments who dont have their own academy will send their recruits here. Also not sure what the pros and cons are doing this. The first thing that jumps out to me is that bond and team work you build with other recruits then when its over, you go your separate ways vs. Other acadamys you continue those relationships etc. Thoughts???

  • #2
    This academy is no joke. If you plan on attending and actually get in, be physically and mentally prepared. I wouldn't be too concerned about building relationships, that'll naturally happen.

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    • #3
      Did you attend this academy?

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      • #4
        Yes, just be beaware getting in is a challenge on its own.

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        • #5
          Well, I would be going in that academy through a p.d not the sheriff department. Only reason I was asking is because the department I'm currently in the process with doesn't have their own academy. I would imagine all academy are tough, but what separates this one from the rest? Anything specific I should prepare for? Thanks!

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          • #6
            Not every agency has their own academy, that’s normal. Usually major cities or counties have one and host it, which allows other agencies to send their recruits.

            You are attending one of the hardest academies in CA. It’s very paramilitary and structured off of Marine Corps bootcamp. I’ve done both so I can attest that they did a great job in that aspect.

            As as far as preparing goes, you need to be in the best shape you can possibly be in, and just be prepared to be yelled at a lot and put under stress. Other than that just practice and memorize your codes and any material your agency may provide. That’s literally all you really can do to prepare other than maybe practice marching and drills. That will all come with time though.

            Goodluck.

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            • #7
              I've heard the same about the paramilitary aspect. They're still stuck in the stone age, but I guess that's just my two cents.

              Good luck.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by GreaseMonkey View Post
                Just curious if anyone is familiar with this academy? Been through it, heard anything about it, going to it etc.? Ive read a few blogs online from years ago, but nothing recent. I know some departments who dont have their own academy will send their recruits here. Also not sure what the pros and cons are doing this. The first thing that jumps out to me is that bond and team work you build with other recruits then when its over, you go your separate ways vs. Other acadamys you continue those relationships etc. Thoughts???
                Very few departments are big enough to have their own academy. On those that do, there isn’t much chance that you’ll be on the same squad as your classmates. The class will be spread across multiple stations, shifts and workdays. That’ll happen with every team you work on throughout your career. People move around in the department.
                Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

                I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by aspiring_fed View Post
                  I've heard the same about the paramilitary aspect. They're still stuck in the stone age, but I guess that's just my two cents.

                  Good luck.
                  Why is that “the Stone Age?” Nowadays, youngsters NEED the structure and discipline that they will require on the job.
                  Last edited by CCCSD; 08-15-2018, 11:18 PM.
                  Now go home and get your shine box!

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                  • moparfan
                    moparfan commented
                    Editing a comment
                    That's why he's an aspiring Fed, what tuff academy do they have. If folks can't handle a Tac Officer yelling in your face over nonsense what will you do on a shooting that just occurred. All that stuff comes into play.

                • #10
                  Yep Mopar.
                  Now go home and get your shine box!

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                  • #11
                    Originally posted by CCCSD View Post

                    Why is that “the Stone Age?” Nowadays, youngsters NEED the structure and discipline that they will require on the job.
                    In my opinion, anyone who needs to be screamed at to gain discipline is not yet mature enough to be a cop. If you screw up too many times in the academy (disciplinary stuff, not the already-mandated POST testing), instead of getting yelled at or PT’d, you should be kicked out of the academy and told to come back when mature. I know plenty of cops who went through a less militaristic academy who are great cops, and I know plenty who went through the tougher academies who are bad cops. Maybe it’s the individual over how rough an academy is.

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                    • #12
                      I was yelled at by drill instructors when I was 18, I definitely developed discipline and matured. In the academy I was yelled at again by the RTOs, it tested my stress tolerance which is great in this profession. Some people aren’t nice in the real world and many variables come into play on the job. Being yelled at while having to learn and complete tasks builds you to being able to function when things go sideways.

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                      • #13
                        Originally posted by aspiring_fed View Post

                        In my opinion, anyone who needs to be screamed at to gain discipline is not yet mature enough to be a cop. If you screw up too many times in the academy (disciplinary stuff, not the already-mandated POST testing), instead of getting yelled at or PT’d, you should be kicked out of the academy and told to come back when mature. I know plenty of cops who went through a less militaristic academy who are great cops, and I know plenty who went through the tougher academies who are bad cops. Maybe it’s the individual over how rough an academy is.
                        It is proven that if there is pain involved whether human or animal in a learning process, that said person/animal retains the newly learned behavior sometimes permanently. Its kind of like an imprinting in the brain. Take for example a nuisance bear, which I deal with sometimes where I work. We use beanbag rounds from a shotgun to shoot them when they come too close to humans. You always know the bears that have been shot with a beanbag round in the past because just them hearing you rack a beanbag round into the chamber of a shotgun makes them immediately afraid and run off without having to actually shoot them. They remember the racking sound from the last time they got shot and immediately associate the sound with pain and react correctly in fear. They know running away is the desired action and they obey.

                        Yelling at a recruit and making them painfully perform pushups, sit ups, flutter kicks etc. etc. is pain. The recruit will almost always associate screw ups or deviation from protocol as a potentially painful outcome and most likely avoid doing so in the future. It can become like muscle memory for the brain.

                        Screwing up and deviating from protocol can lead to injury, death or lawsuits, something a cop in this society needs to avoid at all costs. The newly trained cop needs to understand the importance of that and the best way to teach that is with the proven concept taught at a paramilitary/military type environment.

                        There are no stress cards out in the real world. We all must train like its the real event so when the time comes we react without thinking about it.

                        Of course this isn't a blanket statement and there are some that are too stupid to learn even with pain as a motivator, those recruits should definitely be kicked out of the program. That's ultimately really what the academy is for, weeding out the weak, defiant or dunces from the herd. The best academies use the pain (paramilitary) type training and are the most effective at weeding those individuals out.
                        Last edited by SOCAleo; 08-17-2018, 05:02 PM.

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                        • #14
                          I went to a Gentleman's Police Academy, and I came out a pretty good officer. No yelling at all. We are all adults and were treated as such (all veterans).
                          USAF VETERAN 2004-2012
                          "The sheep pretend the wolf will never come, but the sheepdog lives for that day."-LTC Grossman
                          DA Civilian Police Officer, APG MD

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                          • #15
                            Originally posted by J2H View Post
                            I went to a Gentleman's Police Academy, and I came out a pretty good officer. No yelling at all. We are all adults and were treated as such (all veterans).
                            So you are all veterans. Did you go through a military basic training program (i.e. yelling and PT)? I think you all have, if you're "all veterans?" So you all went through that and are well adjusted adults who can handle whatever life throws at you. So what are you saying? Did you not endure a bootcamp environment? Are you saying that it did nothing for you or your future, did it not prepare you for a police academy?

                            You came "out as a pretty good officer," is it because you went through bootcamp and an academy or because you are that way from the start?

                            You are only proving my point.

                            If not, what are you saying?

                            Comment

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