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  • Questions Regarding LAPD

    Hey, thanks for your time and expertise. I'm 29, male, willing to do any police work in any area.

    1) I have service-connected disability for PTSD(70%) - it is my understanding through secondary research that so long as I have received treatment for it, and that the symptoms are no longer debilitating, it will not disqualify me on its own. I had a problem, got help with it, moved on. I do not mind trading disability for honorable, ethical work but I do take a medicine to abate recurring nightmares(prazosin, taken before bed, DOES NOT impact my cognitive function during the day) that I would not like to lose(either the healthcare which provides it nor the medicine itself). Is there any type of security clearance? I have no debt, I have been with the same girl for 8 years, no legal trouble, no trouble in the army, honorable discharge. The only thing that could possibly be on my record is one parking ticket which I maintain was no fault of mine, though I did pay it.

    2) What is the difference between an applicant with a degree vs. one without? I have a bachelor's degree that I earned online while overseas. It is not a prestigious degree(Bachelor's in Business Administration, University of Phoenix), but a degree nonetheless. I apologize for my ignorance, I am simply accustomed to the military and would like to know the difference. I am completely ignorant of police in civilized countries, therefore I would be reticent to accept a job in any form of leadership due to my inexperience.

    3) Does the work an applicant performed in the military impact his or her job placement? For example, would someone who had a job in combat arms be more likely to get a job that requires presence of mind? What sort of say does one have over the specific type of work they do? I have some buddies who became cops in other states, they ended up working in a jail for a "probation period". I do not mind this whatsoever, but I would simply like to know what one might expect. I understand and respect the concepts of being new, paying one's dues, etc. I am simply curious as to whether or not a person could end up directing traffic for 8 hours a day without any available recourse - excepting a probationary period or punishments.

    4) What are the other officers actually like? I would not enjoy working for an organization where people place their own career, rank or reputation above the accomplishment of the mission. How does working with female officers go? Are overweight officers removed from service? What are the physical fitness standards? I have no problem whatsoever with taking orders from females, or working with them - I do have some problems working with people who are not fit for their duties, and I usually say so. What is the rank structure?

    5) How do police navigate? Are you simply in the same area so much that you know where everything is, along with the corresponding directions? In theater I have never been able to ballpark an azimuth, while some other men could, although it was rare. I am simply curious about this.

    6) What are the opportunities for leadership? What sort of difference does it make to the people with whom you work?

    Thanks again for your time, sincerely.

    With candor, humility and respect,

    R

  • #2
    Originally posted by anonymous000 View Post
    1) I have service-connected disability for PTSD(70%) - it is my understanding through secondary research that so long as I have received treatment for it, and that the symptoms are no longer debilitating, it will not disqualify me on its own. I had a problem, got help with it, moved on. I do not mind trading disability for honorable, ethical work but I do take a medicine to abate recurring nightmares(prazosin, taken before bed, DOES NOT impact my cognitive function during the day) that I would not like to lose(either the healthcare which provides it nor the medicine itself).
    Your self evaluation does not count. In California, every law enforcement candidate is evaluated to determine if they are free from any emotional or mental condition that might adversely affect the exercise of the powers of a police officer, and to otherwise ensure that the candidate is capable of withstanding the psychological demands of the position.

    Whether you can be hired will depend on your mental state at the time of processing, as determined through a series of written and in person psychological evaluation as administered by a licensed psychologist.

    Odds are, if you are medically unable to serve in the military, you will not pass a police medical/psych.

    Originally posted by anonymous000 View Post
    Is there any type of security clearance? I have no debt, I have been with the same girl for 8 years, no legal trouble, no trouble in the army, honorable discharge. The only thing that could possibly be on my record is one parking ticket which I maintain was no fault of mine, though I did pay it.
    Applicants for law enforcement positions are subject to a complex and extensive background investigation. To get an idea of how detailed it is, go here and be prepared to spend the afternoon reading. http://lib.post.ca.gov/Publications/bi.pdf


    Originally posted by anonymous000 View Post
    2) What is the difference between an applicant with a degree vs. one without? I have a bachelor's degree that I earned online while overseas. It is not a prestigious degree(Bachelor's in Business Administration, University of Phoenix), but a degree nonetheless. I apologize for my ignorance, I am simply accustomed to the military and would like to know the difference. I am completely ignorant of police in civilized countries, therefore I would be reticent to accept a job in any form of leadership due to my inexperience.
    Hiring is based on taking a civil service exam that measures your ability to perform the duties of the position you are seeking. People are hired in the order of their exam score, During the hiring process you will take an oral exam. Normally, having a degree might score you one or two additional points.

    Depending on your union contract, some departments will pay additional money (often 5% of your salary) to officers with a Bachelors degree.

    However, in order to qualify, your degree must come from an accredited university. If I understand your post correctly, yours is from a foreign university. California's Commission on Peace Officer standards and Training maintains a list of accredited universities it will recognize and there are few foreign ones on that list, so your degree may be worthless in this setting.

    Originally posted by anonymous000 View Post
    3) Does the work an applicant performed in the military impact his or her job placement? For example, would someone who had a job in combat arms be more likely to get a job that requires presence of mind? What sort of say does one have over the specific type of work they do? I have some buddies who became cops in other states, they ended up working in a jail for a "probation period". I do not mind this whatsoever, but I would simply like to know what one might expect. I understand and respect the concepts of being new, paying one's dues, etc. I am simply curious as to whether or not a person could end up directing traffic for 8 hours a day without any available recourse - excepting a probationary period or punishments.
    In California, having been honorably discharged from the military gets Veterans' Points added to your final civil service score, pushing you ahead of many applicants who are more qualified than yourself. Be satisfied with that.

    It doesn't matter of you were a Seal or a cook, newbies have to learn all of the jobs, whether it be the jail or traffic. If you are unwilling to conform to the requirements of the position, don't apply.


    Originally posted by anonymous000 View Post
    4) What are the other officers actually like? I would not enjoy working for an organization where people place their own career, rank or reputation above the accomplishment of the mission.
    Every government agency and private business has people like that. You learn to work with or around them.


    Originally posted by anonymous000 View Post
    How does working with female officers go?
    Just like with men. There are good and bad.


    Originally posted by anonymous000 View Post
    Are overweight officers removed from service?
    Unless their union contract allows it, Federal law (the Americans with Disabilities Act) prohibits doing so unless it can be demonstrated that because of their weight, they are unable to perform the clearly defined critical (physical) tasks of their position.

    Originally posted by anonymous000 View Post
    What are the physical fitness standards? What is the rank structure?
    They will vary from agency to agency. As the recruiter from the department you are interested in.


    Originally posted by anonymous000 View Post
    I have no problem whatsoever with taking orders from females, or working with them - I do have some problems working with people who are not fit for their duties, and I usually say so.
    Clearly you will have a problem. You can anticipate being rejected on probation for insubordination, willful disobedience,or being someone who lacks the ability to work cooperatively with others.


    Originally posted by anonymous000 View Post
    5) How do police navigate? Are you simply in the same area so much that you know where everything is, along with the corresponding directions?
    That pretty much covers it. A lot of new officers drive their beats on their days off in their personal vehicles to learn the streets.


    Originally posted by anonymous000 View Post
    Hey, thanks for your time and expertise. I'm 29, male, willing to do any police work in any area.


    6) What are the opportunities for leadership? What sort of difference does it make to the people with whom you work?
    Leadership is by example in many agencies. Your peers know best who their natural leaders are, Those leadership skills show through in civil service exams for advancement. That doesn't mean politics aren't involved. Sometimes the worst get promoted and the best get held back because of politics.


    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the information and the link. If I apply and am denied for any reason, what becomes of this information?

      Comment


      • #4
        It stays attached to your file. Permanently.

        Comment


        • #5
          Every agency you apply to retains that information, If you apply anywhere else, as part of the application process at the new department, you will be required to sign a waiver granting access to just about every document that exists relating to your personal history. With that document, each agency you apply to will have access to prior agency documents.

          When you apply for a government job you will be fingerprinted. Those fingerprints are listed in your criminal history as an "Applicant" entry, so every place you apply to will see your criminal history sheet, know everyplace else you sought government employment and know where to seek your records.
          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

          Comment


          • #6
            It won't matter what your service history was. When you're the FNG, you get last pick of shifts, days off and patrol beats. Squawk and they can fire you. While on probation, you can be dismissed for any reason or no reason, with no recourse. Specialized assignments are given based largely on proven performance over time, as well as ability to obey departmental regulations and your reputation as a team player.

            if you're not willing to do it the department way, good luck.
            Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

            I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

            Comment


            • #7
              If you're lucky enough to get hired, keep your mouth shut while you're on probation, (unless you want to get fired), and then after your probation keep your mouth shut for at least two years, unless you want to develop a reputation as 'that guy'.

              Comment


              • #8
                He's already THAT GUY by dint of his posts.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by anonymous000 View Post
                  5) How do police navigate? Are you simply in the same area so much that you know where everything is, along with the corresponding directions? In theater I have never been able to ballpark an azimuth, while some other men could, although it was rare. I am simply curious about this.



                  R
                  I'll answer this one because it was a question I had before I was a cop and did a ride along with an agency where the guy never used a map book (and this was before GPS nav was common). You can learn an area pretty quick. Once you get assigned a beat or area, you use a map book (or the computer has maps on them too, my agency forces trainees to use a map book first before using the computer). After you do it for a while you learn an area, and especially the big streets pretty quick. Most cities are geographically laid out in a manner where the hundred blocks make sense and start out from a central location. For example you learn 1040 Main street is between 10th and 11th streets on the north side. I've heard when LAPD dispatches a call they read out a number called an RD (reporting district I think) that is a small area of the division and they are laid out in a fashion that when you learn them gives you a general idea of where the call is. My department gives out a beat number in similar fashion.

                  The division I currently work is pretty large and has a lot of little streets we do not frequently go to, so a lot of cops bought their own Garmins and use those (the maps on our dept computers are awful). They are also good for calling out pursuits because they always show the direction and street you are on.

                  We surprisingly fail more trainees than you would think because they can not navigate from a map. It's crazy they have no sense of direction and can't figure out a basic life skill. All you need to know is how to get from point A to point B.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
                    He's already THAT GUY by dint of his posts.
                    Good point, you can already tell his FTO's are going to love him...

                    Comment

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