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Question on LAPD rejection letter after poly

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  • Question on LAPD rejection letter after poly

    So last year I did the poly for LAPD and got a letter saying I was not the most qualified candidates and being disqualified. The second paragraph states the following:

    "At this time, you may elect to either withdraw your application or to file a background disqualification appeal. As we recognize that you may have applied with other law enforcement agencies and do not wish for your status in our examination process to be "Disqualified", our records will be revised to reflect that you have withdrawn, if we do not hear from you within one month from the date of this letter. Your background information will only be disclosed as required by law enforcement agencies with your written consent."

    The underlined part is what confuses me but 2 weeks after getting the letter, I called the Background Investigation Division and withdrew my application. Should I have not called to withdraw or waited a month? I did not do an appeal.

  • #2
    You're good. It doesn't make a difference if you did or didn't contact them at all, your file will show withdrawn, instead of disqualified, IF you didn't put in an appeal. I heard that you can be disqualified if you lose the appeal and you can never apply with them or any L.A. city agency. Again, that's just from what I've heard.

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    • #3
      You're good.

      Comment


      • #4
        I hate to break it to you but as far as you future with other agencies is concerned, withdrawing did you little good.

        Your participation in the LAPD process was terminated because something was discovered in your personal history that met their criteria for disqualification. Withdrawing or a DQ will not change that fact.

        When you apply to other agencies you will be asked to disclose those departments you have already applied with. Even if you omit LAPD, it will be discovered through your prints as an applicant on your CII rap sheet.

        Withdrawn or DQ, you will be asked to disclose why you are no longer in process with LAPD. Lie and you are done. Tell the truth and you may or may not be done. In addition, as part of every other agency’s background process you will sign a waiver giving them access to your LAPD background and they will know why LAPD was going to DQ you if you had not withdrawn. If LAPD’s criteria is the same as the new agency, it may be grounds for DQ as well.

        First, you need to seriously assess what the issue was with LAPD. If LAPD was correct, will it be a bar with every pother agency you apply with? If so, is it correctable with time? Only you know for sure. OTOH, if LAPD was mistaken in their assessment of the disqualifying facts surrounding your background, be prepared to explain their error to the next agency and further explain why you did not appeal and defend yourself.
        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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        • #5
          Originally posted by L-1 View Post
          I hate to break it to you but as far as you future with other agencies is concerned, withdrawing did you little good.

          Your participation in the LAPD process was terminated because something was discovered in your personal history that met their criteria for disqualification. Withdrawing or a DQ will not change that fact.

          When you apply to other agencies you will be asked to disclose those departments you have already applied with. Even if you omit LAPD, it will be discovered through your prints as an applicant on your CII rap sheet.

          Withdrawn or DQ, you will be asked to disclose why you are no longer in process with LAPD. Lie and you are done. Tell the truth and you may or may not be done. In addition, as part of every other agency’s background process you will sign a waiver giving them access to your LAPD background and they will know why LAPD was going to DQ you if you had not withdrawn. If LAPD’s criteria is the same as the new agency, it may be grounds for DQ as well.

          First, you need to seriously assess what the issue was with LAPD. If LAPD was correct, will it be a bar with every pother agency you apply with? If so, is it correctable with time? Only you know for sure. OTOH, if LAPD was mistaken in their assessment of the disqualifying facts surrounding your background, be prepared to explain their error to the next agency and further explain why you did not appeal and defend yourself.
          This

          Comment


          • #6
            I was in a similar situation a couple years ago. Completed all the processes with flying colors including the poly. However, during the poly, I recalled some additional details about my past and put them on paper. Although I successfully passed the poly, I got a rejection letter. I already went so far into the process and I felt that I was a good candidate and what I did in the past was not a clear reflection of who I am today. I sent in my appeal, then got the rejection and now I can no longer apply for LAPD.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by The Cable Guy View Post
              I was in a similar situation a couple years ago. Completed all the processes with flying colors including the poly. However, during the poly, I recalled some additional details about my past and put them on paper. Although I successfully passed the poly, I got a rejection letter. I already went so far into the process and I felt that I was a good candidate and what I did in the past was not a clear reflection of who I am today. I sent in my appeal, then got the rejection and now I can no longer apply for LAPD.
              So you passed the Poly, but afterward recalled something that you then admitted to, and were then disqualified? Thats what you get for being honest. I'm not at all advocating being anything less than truthful, but that just shows how flawed that part of the process can be.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by csauce777 View Post
                So you passed the Poly, but afterward recalled something that you then admitted to, and were then disqualified? Thats what you get for being honest. I'm not at all advocating being anything less than truthful, but that just shows how flawed that part of the process can be.
                No. The point of the poly is to see if people omit things and then admit to them later when confronted by a magical tool.

                The poly is NOT A LIE DETECTOR. The poly measures physiological responses to stimuli that may or may not indicate deception. It is nothing more than an interrogation tool.

                If you fill out a questionnaire before the poly and then decide, after they examiner tells you he thinks you're lying, to add some more information that you omitted, then...You. Are. Done. "Remembering" information later is not OK, especially if you only "remember" it after the examiner tells you "Well, my machine says you're lying. What didn't you tell me?"

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                • #9
                  No one can really tell you the right direction to go with this, unless it's your BI with your new department that your a candidate with, and/or an LAPD recruiter/mentor affiliated with the background unit.

                  No matter what, in this profession, whether in the hiring process or on the job.... "You lie you die"...
                  "The only easy day was yesterday"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Code6Chuck View Post
                    No. The point of the poly is to see if people omit things and then admit to them later when confronted by a magical tool.

                    The poly is NOT A LIE DETECTOR. The poly measures physiological responses to stimuli that may or may not indicate deception. It is nothing more than an interrogation tool.

                    If you fill out a questionnaire before the poly and then decide, after they examiner tells you he thinks you're lying, to add some more information that you omitted, then...You. Are. Done. "Remembering" information later is not OK, especially if you only "remember" it after the examiner tells you "Well, my machine says you're lying. What didn't you tell me?"
                    It's an amazing machine, it should be called a memory recall machine. I swear I remembered 2-3 crappy things I did in high school that related to one or two of the questions asked. It really makes your mind dig deep into those memories of a long time passed.

                    I've learned from that mistake and now I have a written personal file on myself so that I don't forget to include them on my questionnaires.

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                    • #11
                      Thank you all for the responses.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Code6Chuck View Post
                        No. The point of the poly is to see if people omit things and then admit to them later when confronted by a magical tool.

                        The poly is NOT A LIE DETECTOR. The poly measures physiological responses to stimuli that may or may not indicate deception. It is nothing more than an interrogation tool.

                        If you fill out a questionnaire before the poly and then decide, after they examiner tells you he thinks you're lying, to add some more information that you omitted, then...You. Are. Done. "Remembering" information later is not OK, especially if you only "remember" it after the examiner tells you "Well, my machine says you're lying. What didn't you tell me?"
                        Some people legitimately don't remember minor details of their life 10-15 years ago.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by beachcop05 View Post
                          Some people legitimately don't remember minor details of their life 10-15 years ago.
                          I'm not arguing that people don't legitimately forget stuff. I'm just saying that if you "remember" stuff after being prodded by the poly examiner, it does not bode well for your future in the hiring process. Fair or not, that's how they roll.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Code6Chuck View Post
                            I'm not arguing that people don't legitimately forget stuff. I'm just saying that if you "remember" stuff after being prodded by the poly examiner, it does not bode well for your future in the hiring process. Fair or not, that's how they roll.
                            Which is why when you write your PHS it must be corroborated by memory and you should probably not deviate from what you've written.

                            I'm not saying be intentionally deceitful, I am saying stick to the written program

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                            • #15
                              I, too, received the same letter after my second polygraph. I did not admit to anything new nor did I omit on anything. It's funny because I passed the polygraph with a nearby agency. Considering my clean background, I don't know how I did not pass it. Honestly.

                              Comment

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