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  • #16
    Does anyone know which correctional facility new deputies are assigned to? Does the department have a jail fto program in place? If so, how many weeks is jail fto? Thanks in advance!

    Eligh15

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    • #17
      Originally posted by aWAKEnD518 View Post
      They added more testing dates this afternoon. Get scheduled ASAP if you are interested.
      Must've filled up quick, I just checked and saw nothing.

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      • #18
        If you live on the east end you will be sent to Indio or Blythe jail. If you live on the west end you could be sent to RPCD, Banning or Southwest. Yes they have a training program for new CD's but not sure the time on the training.
        Not all men can be U.S. Marines that is why there is the Army, Navy and Air Force.

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        • #19
          Anyone going through the process? If so how far along?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by valetudo39 View Post
            If you live on the east end you will be sent to Indio or Blythe jail. If you live on the west end you could be sent to RPCD, Banning or Southwest. Yes they have a training program for new CD's but not sure the time on the training.
            Does this system apply to new Deputy's as well? Obviously they can send you wherever they need, but just curious if try take into consideration where you currently live and things of that nature before making the decision on where to send the Deps

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            • #21
              They try their best to place you close to where you live but I have seen some people get screwed. There is nothing worse than living in Riverside then get sent to Blythe. I know guys that are from the west end that are stuck in the east end. You pretty much need a hardship to get back to the west side if you get stuck in the desert. Good luck!
              Not all men can be U.S. Marines that is why there is the Army, Navy and Air Force.

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              • #22
                Anyone in backgrounds?

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                • #23
                  When I was there, if you were willing to go to Blythe you didnt have to go to the jail and went right to patrol. I lived in Hemet/San Jacinto and actually got to chose between SW and RPDC. I chose RPDC only because I wanted to work the Old Jail just to say I did!
                  I don't know anyone who really got boned. Not that there werent some. I know if they did need someone in Blythe they weren't uprooting families. It seemed to be single Deps who got moved. I dont know of anyone who was forced out there.

                  Although, thats been about 10yrs ago now.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by FlyingPig1 View Post
                    if you were willing to go to Blythe you didnt have to go to the jail and went right to patrol.
                    Kinda what I'm hoping for. I don't really have an interest in working in the jail if it can be avoided. I'll go to Blythe if I have to.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by aWAKEnD518 View Post
                      Kinda what I'm hoping for. I don't really have an interest in working in the jail if it can be avoided. I'll go to Blythe if I have to.
                      All deputies should work the jail.....you are going to deal with the same people on the inside as you will on the outside so the jail prepares you for it.
                      Not all men can be U.S. Marines that is why there is the Army, Navy and Air Force.

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                      • #26
                        Believe me, a couple years in the jail, within a department that works the jail is a necessary evil. Now theres a limit. Its when guys start spending 3-4+ years in the jail that it starts to hurt you. I worked at RPDC for about 2yrs before I lateralled to a City PD. Day 1 on FTO I was meeting people on vehicle stops and calls who recognized me from the jail. I was able to read tats. For example, I became quite an expert on the NLR. I stopped a car one night on FTO and the passenger had his arm on the door as I walked up on the passenger side. Dude had the letters "NL" on the back of his right tricep. The guy driving was about 40ish and was completely sleeved to include his face and neck.

                        Any idea why that would be a cause for concern? Thats the stuff you learn in the jail.

                        In the jail you learn to fight like a cop. You learn what defensive tactics work and which ones are just for liability purposes. You also learn pretty quick when its time to just throw down. You learn in a semi controlled environment how people lie and lie and lie.....and Im not even talking about the inmates!!

                        You learn to control your adrenaline rush when you hear a Dep call for immediate back up and you go running at full speed up stairs and across day rooms, and then when you get there, its game on!

                        You learn to control that "rush". Unless your an experienced fighter, you cannot imagine how amped you get as a Deputy fighting an inmate trying to get some buffed out paroles arms under control. Its times like that when young cops get in trouble by getting a couple extra blows in, a couple jabs for the "good guys" after hes been cuffed. You learn that S--t dont fly in the real world. Self control was probably one of the most important things I learned. I went through FTO at my new agency with cops right out of the academy. I had spent 2 yrs in jail talking to turds. One of the worst things you can do as a cop is try to bluff a seasoned inmate. They will call you on it HARD. You will learn command presence. If you dont have it, you will know pretty fast. And its got nothing to do with how big your biceps are. Its a humbling experience to have some tank boss punk you in front of 30 other laughing inmates that are all laughing at YOU!
                        Better to learn those things in the jail in a semi controlled environment vs out on the street.

                        I remember one trainee got so nervous subject checking a local tat'd veterano gangster that he threw up talking to the guy! Fortunately, the FTO knew the gangster and everyone had a good laugh and the FTO sent the parolee on his way

                        You can go into the jail and come out 25lbs over weight and disgruntled, or you can go in and come out an 11550 expert and walking gang encyclopedia. All up to you. Your jail rep WILL follow you out to patrol.
                        Last edited by FlyingPig1; 03-17-2012, 06:18 PM.

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                        • #27
                          thanks for the great post flyingpig. I'm hoping to get on board with LASD and that's some good insight you've got. Where did you work detentions?

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                          • #28
                            Robert Presley for RSO

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by FlyingPig1 View Post
                              Believe me, a couple years in the jail, within a department that works the jail is a necessary evil. Now theres a limit. Its when guys start spending 3-4+ years in the jail that it starts to hurt you. I worked at RPDC for about 2yrs before I lateralled to a City PD. Day 1 on FTO I was meeting people on vehicle stops and calls who recognized me from the jail. I was able to read tats. For example, I became quite an expert on the NLR. I stopped a car one night on FTO and the passenger had his arm on the door as I walked up on the passenger side. Dude had the letters "NL" on the back of his right tricep. The guy driving was about 40ish and was completely sleeved to include his face and neck.

                              Any idea why that would be a cause for concern? Thats the stuff you learn in the jail.

                              In the jail you learn to fight like a cop. You learn what defensive tactics work and which ones are just for liability purposes. You also learn pretty quick when its time to just throw down. You learn in a semi controlled environment how people lie and lie and lie.....and Im not even talking about the inmates!!

                              You learn to control your adrenaline rush when you hear a Dep call for immediate back up and you go running at full speed up stairs and across day rooms, and then when you get there, its game on!

                              You learn to control that "rush". Unless your an experienced fighter, you cannot imagine how amped you get as a Deputy fighting an inmate trying to get some buffed out paroles arms under control. Its times like that when young cops get in trouble by getting a couple extra blows in, a couple jabs for the "good guys" after hes been cuffed. You learn that S--t dont fly in the real world. Self control was probably one of the most important things I learned. I went through FTO at my new agency with cops right out of the academy. I had spent 2 yrs in jail talking to turds. One of the worst things you can do as a cop is try to bluff a seasoned inmate. They will call you on it HARD. You will learn command presence. If you dont have it, you will know pretty fast. And its got nothing to do with how big your biceps are. Its a humbling experience to have some tank boss punk you in front of 30 other laughing inmates that are all laughing at YOU!
                              Better to learn those things in the jail in a semi controlled environment vs out on the street.

                              I remember one trainee got so nervous subject checking a local tat'd veterano gangster that he threw up talking to the guy! Fortunately, the FTO knew the gangster and everyone had a good laugh and the FTO sent the parolee on his way

                              You can go into the jail and come out 25lbs over weight and disgruntled, or you can go in and come out an 11550 expert and walking gang encyclopedia. All up to you. Your jail rep WILL follow you out to patrol.
                              Just ****ing great ....you got my adrenaline pumping! You reminded me of some of the scraps I got in the jail.......
                              Not all men can be U.S. Marines that is why there is the Army, Navy and Air Force.

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                              • #30
                                I should be a recruiter...although its not like you need to convince people to do this job, their already standing in line.

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