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  • Officer retaliation problems still plague LAPD, inspector general finds

    Officer retaliation problems still plague LAPD, inspector general finds
    May 16, 2011 | 5:10 pm


    The independent watchdog of the Los Angeles Police Department again has found serious shortcomings in how the LAPD investigates cases of retaliation among officers.

    LAPD policy forbids officers from retaliating against other officers who report misconduct, take advantage of allotted time off, or exercise other rights granted to them. Retaliation often takes the form of poor work evaluations, harassment or job reassignments.

    On Tuesday, Nicole Bershon, inspector general for the L.A. Police Commission, is scheduled to present to the oversight panel her latest report on retaliation inside the LAPD. As in past reports, Bershon’s team was troubled by the fact that departmental investigators frequently determine that accusations made by one officer against another do not amount to formal misconduct. Therefore, Bershon found, investigators commonly do not bother to interview the officer accused of wrongdoing.

    The inspector general’s report was also critical of the LAPD practice of removing the accused officer from the investigation altogether –- a move that makes it difficult, if not impossible, to detect patterns of behavior among officers, Bershon concluded.

    “Retaliation and other workplace complaints are some of the most complex investigations confronting the department. However, we believe that, given the severity of retaliation allegations, and the fact that the incidents surrounding these complaints often result in litigation against the department, it is essential that these investigations are thorough and comprehensive,” Bershon wrote in the report.

    Retaliation among officers has been a problem in the LAPD for decades. An article in the Times last week highlighted the issue and explored the unusually high number of lawsuits that LAPD officers file against the department claiming retaliation, harassment and other workplace issues.http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lano...eral-says.html

  • #2
    Originally posted by RWC View Post
    Retaliation among officers has been a problem in the LAPD for decades.
    As long as management considers retaliation against subordinates a viable "tool", this isn't going to change. Officers take their cues from those above them and this is an unfortunate part of that department's culture.
    "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

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    • #3
      The dept will often "Admin transfer", virtually a mid month forced transfer to a place of the departments choosing, guys who get certain types of complaints as soon as the complaint comes in before any investigation actually even starts. They bench guys left and right pending investigations and they take forever getting the guys back into their previous assignment or a similar unit after they are cleared of wrong doing.

      Also it is comman practice to be turned down for promotions or assignments to specialized units due to complaint history, even if the complaints are not true and the officer is cleared. Now some people may say, wait, the package the reviewers get for promotions doesn't have any information about non-sustained complaints...it doesn't but how hard is it for them to take a peek at the full package? It isn't and it's commonly done.

      Now with that said I don't think it is the intent of "most" of the supervision to screw guys over for fun, but it's a built in management style the LAPD has run with for decades and it is instilled in the command staff old and new.
      Originally Posted by VegasMetro
      maybe it’s me but I think a six pack and midget porn makes for good times?????

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      • #4
        Originally posted by mtxpro752 View Post
        The dept will often "Admin transfer", virtually a mid month forced transfer to a place of the departments choosing, guys who get certain types of complaints as soon as the complaint comes in before any investigation actually even starts. They bench guys left and right pending investigations and they take forever getting the guys back into their previous assignment or a similar unit after they are cleared of wrong doing.

        Also it is comman practice to be turned down for promotions or assignments to specialized units due to complaint history, even if the complaints are not true and the officer is cleared. Now some people may say, wait, the package the reviewers get for promotions doesn't have any information about non-sustained complaints...it doesn't but how hard is it for them to take a peek at the full package? It isn't and it's commonly done.

        Now with that said I don't think it is the intent of "most" of the supervision to screw guys over for fun, but it's a built in management style the LAPD has run with for decades and it is instilled in the command staff old and new.
        This article wasn't discussing the topic of citizen complaints, though I'm sure your comments are accurate to that discussion.

        My department is much smaller than LAPD, but I see retaliation here too. The biggest retaliation I see is against those who utilize 4850 time. God forbid you blow your knee out, or get a back injury and have to take time off to heal or have surgery. I see other supervisors treating guys like they are stealing from the department. I understand that there are guys who will milk an injury to get more time off, but this is no excuse to treat everyone who is off on an injury like crap. We had a guy who was out for the full year of 4850 time after he had minor TC on duty and complained of migraines. I don’t know if he embellished or not, but I do know that he tried to come back to work for about a week and he would puke his guts out 5 or 6 times per shift saying that his head hurt so bad he couldn't’t even think straight. He eventually retired and I never heard anything good said about him, even though he was a good cop and a good friend. It was always “oh, he just wanted a way out”, or “what a fake, a minor TC retired him?” Yet, none of the guys bagging on him were doctors or knew anything about his injury (or possible lack thereof).
        I doubt that anything will ever fix this problem. At least at LAPD if you get a bad rep you can transfer out and build your reputation again.
        "I contend that for a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle." Winston Churchill

        Liberals are very broadminded: they are always willing to give careful consideration to both sides of the same side.

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        • #5
          Nice to know that nothing's changed, since I left in 2007.

          Just keep the direct-deposit pension checks a comin' and I'll welcome any other LAPD escapees headed 1000 miles east!
          "You're never fully dressed without a smile."

          Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

          Three things I know for sure: (1) No bad deed goes unrewarded, (2) No good deed goes unpunished, and (3) It is entirely possible to push the most devoted, loyal and caring person beyond the point where they no longer give a 5h!t.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Kieth M. View Post
            Nice to know that nothing's changed, since I left in 2007.
            I guess the new climate isn't the only thing that's cold out there Kieth!

            Seriously, it's a shame more can't be done to change the management culture out here. What's worse, is the prevailing anti-union hostility that's being drummed up by those only concerned with "taxpayers' rights". While no one (myself included) will deny that there have been abuses by officers (that unions are required to defend), getting rid of civil service protections and allowing managers to punish without showing "cause" is only going to make the situation worse. Office politics in the law enforcement environment certainly degrades the professionalism of the agency and service it provides.
            "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

            Comment

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