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  • San Diego police chief announces strategy to reduce officer misconduct

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lano...%28L.A.+Now%29

    San Diego police chief announces strategy to reduce officer misconduct
    May 10, 2011 | 9:00 pm
    Embarrassed by a recent spate of misconduct allegations against his officers, the San Diego police chief Tuesday publicly apologized and announced a series of reforms meant to "greatly reduce future incidents."

    "I want to personally apologize to every citizen of San Diego," Police Chief William Lansdowne said at a news conference in front of police headquarters, backed by his command staff and members of the police officers' labor union.

    Lansdowne announced that additional personnel will be added to the internal affairs unit that investigates allegations against officers.

    Also, a confidential hot line is being established that will be monitored by Lansdowne and a review of the department's use-of-force tactics is underway. Supervisors will be given additional "early intervention" training in how to spot troublesome behavior among officers.

    The announcement comes days after a veteran officer was booked into jail for felony drunk driving in an off-duty incident.

    There have been nine misconduct cases in recent months involving allegations of excessive force, stalking an ex-girlfriend, burglary, drunk driving, rape, domestic violence and demanding sexual favors from female motorists. Most involved off-duty conduct. One officer has been fired, another forced to resign.

    Lansdowne, 67, was named San Diego police chief in 2003 after serving as chief in San Jose and Richmond in Northern California. The San Diego department has 2,100 sworn officers.
    Ignore List----DAL

    "but I warranty you that I’ll be a better candidate than a kid that just got out of high school and self-sponsor himself."...Just another brain surgeon who's looking for a cop job on Officer.com.

  • #2
    Early intervention is the biggest BS ever.

    Comment


    • #3
      good supervisors who are out in the field, checking up on their officers is the best way to make sure officers are doing the right thing. It took me awhile to get used to several of my Sgts stopping by calls, at first it annoyed me, but then I figured it was great. They see how I work, they know how I treat people. So when and if I get a complaint they can honestly tell people to f off as they know how I act and carry myself as a police officer.

      BTW we have started a early intervention program as well and you are right total BS
      Happy to be here proud to serve

      "Well it appears this lock does not accept american express."

      Never trust fire fighters to point out a suspect.

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      • #4
        So why is the early intervention program B/S?
        Retired

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by retired View Post
          So why is the early intervention program B/S?
          Because it is an excuse to make mountains out of molehills. Officer so and so took an extra 10 minutes on his lunch break, well we dont like him, so we will call that an early warning.
          Originally posted by FJDave
          GM, you have just set the bar that much higher for the rest of us in our witty, sarcastic responses. I yield to you! Good job, kind Sir!

          District B13
          "We are not cops nor Feds." yet he still poses as an officer Hmmmm


          Grant us grace, fearlessly, to contend against evil and to make no peace with oppression.--WWII memorial

          "I have loved justice and hated iniquity, therefore I die in exile."

          Pope Gregory V II

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by retired View Post
            So why is the early intervention program B/S?
            Essentially it is a computer program that assesses an officer's risk of being a problem child. Stats that go into the computer are certain crime reports (mostly battery reports) certain arrests (mostly 674f, 5150, 148, and 243b arrests), how much use of force, OIS, pitchess motions, citizen complaints, missed courts, missed shoots, etc. There are about 15 factors. The program rates you above average or top 5% in your specific division. Once you hit the top 5% in several categories you are "on the radar." Now of course most people have 0% on most categories, but if you are a proactive officer who takes a lot of reports you can easily end up on the radar.

            Usually it's a forced transfer. It's a computer based witch hunt.

            Comment


            • #7
              Another one just arrested for kidnapping and rape.
              Molly Weasley makes Chuck Norris eat his vegetables.

              sigpic

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by nobodyjr View Post
                Essentially it is a computer program that assesses an officer's risk of being a problem child. Stats that go into the computer are certain crime reports (mostly battery reports) certain arrests (mostly 674f, 5150, 148, and 243b arrests), how much use of force, OIS, pitchess motions, citizen complaints, missed courts, missed shoots, etc. There are about 15 factors. The program rates you above average or top 5% in your specific division. Once you hit the top 5% in several categories you are "on the radar." Now of course most people have 0% on most categories, but if you are a proactive officer who takes a lot of reports you can easily end up on the radar.

                Usually it's a forced transfer. It's a computer based witch hunt.
                Doesn't part of the program encourage early interaction by supervisors? The program has been around over 25 years, and I believe it has experienced a high degree of success, not only with identifying area of problems with some officers, but involving their supervisors early, so they can make a difference in assisting an officer in avoiding future problems.

                But then again, everyone has an opinion, and that is mine. No one has to agree or disagree with it.
                Retired

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by willowdared View Post
                  Another one just arrested for kidnapping and rape.
                  Here's a link:

                  http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lano...ping-case.html

                  San Diego police officer arrested in rape and kidnapping case

                  May 11, 2011

                  A San Diego police officer was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of kidnapping and raping a 34-year-old woman while on duty, authorities said.

                  Daniel Dana, 26, an officer for four years, was booked into San Diego County Jail.

                  The woman told investigators that Dana sent her a text message around 3 a.m. Wednesday and threatened to arrest her if she did not have sex with him, authorities said.

                  Dana is no longer with the Police Department, officials said.

                  The arrest came a day after Police Chief William Lansdowne announced a series of actions to reduce incidents of officer misconduct.
                  “Let him go, Lou. Someone driving that fast has no time for a ticket.”
                  -Chief Wiggum

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I know this officer, I have worked side by side with him. I don't know what to say. I don't know what's going on with this dept.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by retired View Post
                      Doesn't part of the program encourage early interaction by supervisors? The program has been around over 25 years, and I believe it has experienced a high degree of success, not only with identifying area of problems with some officers, but involving their supervisors early, so they can make a difference in assisting an officer in avoiding future problems.

                      But then again, everyone has an opinion, and that is mine. No one has to agree or disagree with it.
                      I am talking about specifically the program cited in the report (EIIS), which is computer based. I'm not talking about supervisors realizing their people have issues and helping them out. That's good supervision. I'm talking about a computer program used by the command to deal with people who may not even have issues, whom they probably have never met.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by nobodyjr View Post
                        I am talking about specifically the program cited in the report (EIIS), which is computer based. I'm not talking about supervisors realizing their people have issues and helping them out. That's good supervision. I'm talking about a computer program used by the command to deal with people who may not even have issues, whom they probably have never met.
                        I agree

                        18 years ago I worked with a chief that started a program tracking 148's, pursuits, stuff like that...after a few us us go getters were on the radar, we all did the minimum and basicly just adopted the fireman philosphy and were reactive instead of proactive.
                        Last edited by WPD954; 05-12-2011, 12:12 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by WPD954 View Post
                          we all did the minimum and basicly just adopted the fireman philosphy and were reactive instead of proactive.
                          When a department is looking to scapegoat people to show the media they are getting tough on misconduct, that is the best thing to do.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            In the end, we are human. Humans make mistakes. All the intervention/training/briefings will not change that fact.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by nobodyjr View Post
                              I am talking about specifically the program cited in the report (EIIS), which is computer based. I'm not talking about supervisors realizing their people have issues and helping them out. That's good supervision. I'm talking about a computer program used by the command to deal with people who may not even have issues, whom they probably have never met.

                              Before computers, the entries were made in the officers performance log. I don't recall that any of the entries were designed to make a scapegoat of an officer or to "get" him. I thought they were a useful tool both for supervisors and for the officer.

                              But then again, that is just my opinion.
                              Retired

                              Comment

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