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Early Release Program Opinions? Impact?

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  • Early Release Program Opinions? Impact?

    Probation Officer here in Nor Cal. My county jail cut loose about half of their population last week when the early release program kicked in. Many were my felons serving violation of probation sentences...needless to say I was swamped with dirtbags checking in with me. We (County Narcotics Task Force) have been conducting probation sweeps daily and have hooked many of these same yahoos in the last week. Anyone else feeling any impact? Opinions on the early release program? (pretty good deal for our felons...one day served = one day credit)

  • #2
    That program is going to come back and bite those that endorsed it in the butt. Most of those released will go back to their life of crime and just end up back in jail.
    Retired LASD

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    • #3
      Impact = Suck

      Everyone gets so wrapped up in fancy ideas and programs we forget the base concept = These people are CRIMINALS. They have violated societies rules and we separate them so that they cannot continue to do it.

      Defeats the purpose of incarceration if they don't stay incarcerated.
      Other officer: Oh that's right, I forgot, you're God's gift to police work.
      Me: At least someone recognizes it.

      Turns out basic police work isn't so hard, you just have to leave the station.

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      • #4
        I have spent my entire career trying to overload the prisons, now I am told thats a bad thing. Cant wait to retire.
        Originally posted by FJDave
        GM, you have just set the bar that much higher for the rest of us in our witty, sarcastic responses. I yield to you! Good job, kind Sir!

        District B13
        "We are not cops nor Feds." yet he still poses as an officer Hmmmm


        Grant us grace, fearlessly, to contend against evil and to make no peace with oppression.--WWII memorial

        "I have loved justice and hated iniquity, therefore I die in exile."

        Pope Gregory V II

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        • #5
          I agree with all of you. The goal was to reduce facility population...these dirtbags are now released only doing half-time on their sentences. Mission accomplished. Brilliant minds at work. Now they're back on the streets chasing dope and committing new offenses in the process. We've hooked five felons on new offenses and VOPs that were released last week (sweeps with my Task Force bros...routine probation searches). Right back to what they do best.

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          • #6
            What do you think will happen when a violent crime occurs and the perpetrator is identified as one of these early releasers?

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            • #7
              It has already happened.....

              An early release 'non violent' offender committed an attempted rape 16 hours after being released in the Sacramento area
              The posts on this forum by this poster are of his personal opinion, and his personal opinion alone

              "Politicians are like diapers. They need to be changed often and for the same reason"

              "We fight not for glory; nor for wealth; nor honor, but only and alone we fight for freedom, which no good man surrenders but with his life"

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              • #8
                Good grief. I hope this gets some coverage. We should e-mail O'Reilly and let him tear this early release idea apart.

                Video interview.


                A Sacramento inmate who was released this week as part of a state plan to reduce the prison population is back in jail again.

                After being released Monday night, Sacramento police say 22-year-old Kevin Peterson was arrested a little after noon Tuesday on suspicion of attempted rape.

                Police Sgt. Norm Leong says Peterson is being held without bail after allegedly trying to rape a female counselor he was meeting with and holding her captive.

                Peterson had been released 16 days early from the Sacramento County Jail after serving two months of a four-month sentence for violating probation.

                He had previously served a one-year sentence for felony assault.

                Under a law signed by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger jails are now required to release inmates for good behavior after serving half their sentence.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by X1X1X1 View Post
                  Good grief. I hope this gets some coverage. We should e-mail O'Reilly and let him tear this early release idea apart.

                  Video interview.
                  Good thing we're releasing only "non-violent" offenders early........no risk to society right? Sounds familiar...released two months early on a violation of probation sentence...then attempts to rape a counselor.

                  Ahhhh...what a wonderful system we work in. Very much like my dirtbags that have suspended state prison sentences hanging over their heads...they violate probation...I hook, book and recommend prison. I find out after months of continued Court hearings that the yahoo is given another chance on probation with a few months in county jail.

                  Makes me often ask "what's the point"?

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                  • #10
                    Non-violent offenders arguably cost society more money than violent offenders. They are the ones stealing from stores and burglarizing houses and cars. Sadly, we will never see the day when any felony will be a guaranteed prison sentence for the full term, no early release. If that ever happened, crime would definitely go down.
                    Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

                    I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

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                    • #11
                      California is experiencing it's lowest crime rate in decades and few doubt it's a coincidence that more felons are incarcerated now than ever before. Start releasing felons and they'll be free to commit more crimes. Start releasing felons with even less supervision, and those numbers of violations will increase exponentially.

                      It's only a matter of time before the public "gets it" and starts demanding more protection. The government must set priorities and public safety is "#1". (I knew there was a reason I entered LE in the 1970s and stuck with it for so long before retiring: Job Security! )
                      "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pulicords View Post
                        California is experiencing it's lowest crime rate in decades and few doubt it's a coincidence that more felons are incarcerated now than ever before. Start releasing felons and they'll be free to commit more crimes. Start releasing felons with even less supervision, and those numbers of violations will increase exponentially.

                        It's only a matter of time before the public "gets it" and starts demanding more protection. The government must set priorities and public safety is "#1". (I knew there was a reason I entered LE in the 1970s and stuck with it for so long before retiring: Job Security! )
                        Pulicords,

                        Would one Probation Officer with a caseload of 500+ felons...many violent, high-risk, and on parole as well be a case of "even less supervision?" Help me brother (or sister)!! We do our best to keep tabs on our dirtbags, but it's impossible (hence the importance of the great relationship we have with our SO, local PD's, Parole, DOJ, etc.) We partner together everyday in the street for dope hits, warrant services, and probation sweeps. Great partnership.

                        You're right on though. County Probation Officers and CDC Parole Agents are way overloaded. Impossible to effectively supervise all of these released yahoos. Now it's only going to get worse. You're right though...JOB SECURITY BABY!!!

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                        • #13
                          The people spoke loudly all the through the 90s with all the laws that were passed to send criminals to prison. The dumb Austrian is doing everything he can to subvert the will of the people.
                          Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

                          I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by X1X1X1 View Post
                            Good grief. I hope this gets some coverage. We should e-mail O'Reilly and let him tear this early release idea apart.

                            Video interview.
                            I took the liberty of emailing all the LA, Bay Area, and San Diego news stations I could think of. I also emailed CNN. Many of them responded by putting a brief 15-20 second clip on their news station. Some coverage is better than no coverage, right?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jdlong View Post
                              Pulicords,

                              Would one Probation Officer with a caseload of 500+ felons...many violent, high-risk, and on parole as well be a case of "even less supervision?" Help me brother (or sister)!!
                              You guys are without a doubt LE's lowliest, red headed, step child! (Second only to Dept of Fish and Game) I've been to parole offices before, seen your working conditions (some of these places are worse than parolee's homes) and know about your caseloads. It is appalling.

                              There's a lot of money spent by the state on "projects" that should be thrown your way, but isn't. IMHO, the state shouldn't be spending as much money on colleges and universities, as they do. Tuition fees should pay for a lot more of the costs associated with post-secondary education. No one promised me a college education. I had to work, pay for and continue with my studies on my own.

                              Why is the state subsidizing anyone's education in "liberal arts", "Women's studies", "Chicano studies", etc... These "feel good" programs don't produce anything other than the next generation of "feel good" college instructors and professors. Students, their parents and private organizations should bear more of the costs.
                              "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

                              Comment

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