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  • Motorcycle endorsement and scooters

    I keep getting this question asked a lot and i haven't been able to find the official answer. My question is the two types of motorcycle endorsement are M1 and M2. Now what I've heard is M2 is 149 CC and under and M1 is 150 cc and up. Is this true???
    If true what is the cost of both separately and is their any other differences??
    Also what is the tests consist of for written and road?
    Not affiliated with my avatar. My opinions are all mine and do not represent anybody else. All names are fictional and coincidental if there is someone in the world with aforementioned name.

  • #2
    Here is the on-line Motorcycle Riders Handbook issued by the DMV. You will find all that you need contained therein.

    http://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/dl655/dl665mcycle.pdf

    LICENSE REQUIREMENTSREQUIREMENTS

    California issues the following license classes for two-wheel vehicle operation:

    • Class M1—You may operate any two-wheel motorcycle, motor-driven cycle, or motorized scooter and all vehicles listed under Class M2.
    NOTE:The permit and license requirements in this handbook pertain to two-wheel vehicles and are referenced in Section 12804.9 of the Vehicle Code.

    • Class M2—You may operate any motorized bicycle, any bicycle with an attached motor, or a motorized scooter.

    You may obtain a Class M1 or M2 license at any DMV office which provides driver license services. Motorcycle law tests and skill tests are required.
    NOTE: Class C licensees may operate a motorcycle with a side car attached or a three-wheel motorcycle.
    Costs run somewhere in the $30.00 range each for Learner's Permit; Class M1 or Class M2 licenses.

    If you possess a Class M1 license you may operate any two wheeled vehicle. With an M2, you are restricted to a motorized bicycle, any bicycle with an attached motor, or a motorized scooter.
    Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence!

    [George Washington (1732 - 1799)]

    Comment


    • #3
      The written test is very straight forward; study the booklet and you will be OK. I would highly recommend the MSF basic rider's course. You'll get some good info that will keep you alive a little longer...

      Besides, the DMV skills test for an M1 is very, very difficult (on a sportbike, anyway) Only a handful of riders I know were able to pass it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SgtCHP View Post
        Here is the on-line Motorcycle Riders Handbook issued by the DMV. You will find all that you need contained therein.

        http://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/dl655/dl665mcycle.pdf



        Costs run somewhere in the $30.00 range each for Learner's Permit; Class M1 or Class M2 licenses.

        If you possess a Class M1 license you may operate any two wheeled vehicle. With an M2, you are restricted to a motorized bicycle, any bicycle with an attached motor, or a motorized scooter.
        Thanks for the great info as always. One last question from your quote it looks like someone could ride a 500 CC scooter on an M2 are there no size restrictions??
        Not affiliated with my avatar. My opinions are all mine and do not represent anybody else. All names are fictional and coincidental if there is someone in the world with aforementioned name.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by R1pilot View Post
          The written test is very straight forward; study the booklet and you will be OK. I would highly recommend the MSF basic rider's course. You'll get some good info that will keep you alive a little longer...

          Besides, the DMV skills test for an M1 is very, very difficult (on a sportbike, anyway) Only a handful of riders I know were able to pass it.
          What did you have to prove with the skills test and what bike did you take it on???
          Not affiliated with my avatar. My opinions are all mine and do not represent anybody else. All names are fictional and coincidental if there is someone in the world with aforementioned name.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by natejpg View Post
            Thanks for the great info as always. One last question from your quote it looks like someone could ride a 500 CC scooter on an M2 are there no size restrictions??
            I just recently got my M1. About a month ago. Do take the MSF course, you learn a lot about leaning, stopping, starting, going over obstacles, etc. An M1 covers all types of two wheel motor vehicles. Pretty much, an M1 is better than an M2. Courses usually run $235 and are only 2 consecutive weekends.

            As for getting the license; if you successfully pass the test at the end on the last day (a course that puts all learned information to use) then you will receive a paper that waives the driving test. All you have to do is take the permit test. LOL. I had to take the permit test 4 times. Aha. Additionally, you will have to take half (front page) of the class C permit test also, so study for that test and all the new regulations that became law.

            I think I covered most of everything that I personally went through. Let me know if you want more info.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by natejpg View Post
              What did you have to prove with the skills test and what bike did you take it on???
              Oh yeah, for the MSF course, you will be using either a 125cc or 250cc.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Mtoledo View Post
                I just recently got my M1. About a month ago. Do take the MSF course, you learn a lot about leaning, stopping, starting, going over obstacles, etc. An M1 covers all types of two wheel motor vehicles. Pretty much, an M1 is better than an M2. Courses usually run $235 and are only 2 consecutive weekends.

                As for getting the license; if you successfully pass the test at the end on the last day (a course that puts all learned information to use) then you will receive a paper that waives the driving test. All you have to do is take the permit test. LOL. I had to take the permit test 4 times. Aha. Additionally, you will have to take half (front page) of the class C permit test also, so study for that test and all the new regulations that became law.

                I think I covered most of everything that I personally went through. Let me know if you want more info.
                +1. If you want a motorcycle, it is a MUST to take the MSF course.
                http://www.msf-usa.org/

                Comment


                • #9
                  I attempted it on a gsx-r750. Failed miserably. The test consists of lots of low speed turning, weaving and staying between the lines. It's very hard to ride a sportbike that slow (i.e. burping the clutch, braking and trying not to kill it while riding in a circle AND keeping both feet on the pegs)

                  If you know someone who would let you borrow a dual purpose (enduro) or a little cruiser, you could pass it pretty easily, but the turning radius on most sportbikes is non-existent.

                  I gave up, spent the $200 on the MSF course. Completion of the course waives the DMV skills test, and you can learn a lot from those CHP guys.

                  Plus, there are only a few things funnier than watching people who have no idea how to ride in the learning process.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by natejpg View Post
                    Thanks for the great info as always. One last question from your quote it looks like someone could ride a 500 CC scooter on an M2 are there no size restrictions??
                    Here are the basic definitions for motorcycles, motor-driven cycles, scooters, etc.

                    Motorcycle

                    400. (a) A "motorcycle" is any motor vehicle having a seat or saddle for the use of the rider, designed to travel on not more than three wheels in contact with the ground, and weighing less than 1,500 pounds.

                    (b) A motor vehicle that has four wheels in contact with the ground, two of which are a functional part of a sidecar, is a motorcycle if the vehicle otherwise comes within the definition of subdivision (a).

                    (c) A motor vehicle that is electrically powered, has a maximum speed of 45 miles per hour, and weighs less than 2,500 pounds, is a motorcycle if the vehicle otherwise comes within the definition of subdivision (a).

                    (d) A farm tractor is not a motorcycle.

                    (e) A three-wheeled motor vehicle that otherwise meets the requirements of subdivision (a), has a partially or completely enclosed seating area for the driver and passenger, is used by local public agencies for the enforcement of parking control provisions, and is operated at slow speeds on public streets, is not a motorcycle. However, a motor vehicle described in this subdivision shall comply with the applicable sections of this code imposing equipment installation requirements on motorcycles.

                    Amended Ch. 972, Stats. 1992. Effective January 1, 1993.
                    Amended Ch. 594, Stats. 1993. Effective January 1, 1994.
                    Repealed Ch. 594, Stats. 1993. Effective January 1, 1994. Operative January 1, 1997.
                    Amended Ch. 675, Stats. 1994. Effective January 1, 1995.
                    Repealed Ch. 675, Stats. 1994. Effective January 1, 1995. Operative January 1, 1997.
                    Repealed Sec. 2, 3, and added Sec 4, Ch. 453, Stats. 1996. Effective January 1, 1997.

                    Motor-Driven Cycle

                    405. A "motor-driven cycle" is any motorcycle with a motor that displaces less than 150 cubic centimeters. A motor-driven cycle does not include a motorized bicycle, as defined in Section 406.


                    Amended Ch. 1359, Stats. 1990. Effective January 1, 1991.
                    Amended Ch. 928, Stats. 1991. Effective October 14, 1991.
                    Amended Sec. 1, Ch. 342, Stats. 1995. Effective January 1, 1996.

                    Motorized Bicycle

                    406. (a) A "motorized bicycle" or "moped" is any two-wheeled or three-wheeled device having fully operative pedals for propulsion by human power, or having no pedals if powered solely by electrical energy, and an automatic transmission and a motor which produces less than 2 gross brake horsepower and is capable of propelling the device at a maximum speed of not more than 30 miles per hour on level ground.

                    (b) A "motorized bicycle" is also a device that has fully operative pedals for propulsion by human power and has an electric motor that meets all of the following requirements:

                    (1) Has a power output of not more than 1,000 watts.

                    (2) Is incapable of propelling the device at a speed of more than 20 miles per hour on ground level.

                    (3) Is incapable of further increasing the speed of the device when human power is used to propel the motorized bicycle faster than 20 miles per hour.

                    (4) Every manufacturer of motorized bicycles, as defined in this subdivision, shall provide a disclosure to buyers that advises buyers that their existing insurance policies may not provide coverage for these bicycles and that they should contact their insurance company or insurance agent to determine if coverage is provided.

                    (c) The disclosure required under paragraph (4) of subdivision (b) shall meet both of the following requirements:

                    (1) The disclosure shall be printed in not less than 14-point boldface type on a single sheet of paper that contains no information other than the disclosure.

                    (2) The disclosure shall include the following language in capital letters:

                    "YOUR INSURANCE POLICIES MAY NOT PROVIDE COVERAGE FOR ACCIDENTS INVOLVING THE USE OF THIS BICYCLE. TO DETERMINE IF COVERAGE IS PROVIDED YOU SHOULD CONTACT YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY OR AGENT."

                    Amended Sec. 1, Ch. 804, Stats. 1995. Effective January 1, 1996. Supersedes Sec. 2, Ch. 342.

                    Motorized Quadricycle and Motorized Tricycle

                    407. A "motorized quadricycle" is a four-wheeled device, and a "motorized tricycle" is a three-wheeled device, designed to carry not more than two persons, including the driver, and having either an electric motor or a motor with an automatic transmission developing less than two gross brake horsepower and capable of propelling the device at a maximum speed of not more than 30 miles per hour on level ground. The device shall be utilized only by a person who by reason of physical disability is otherwise unable to move about as a pedestrian or by a senior citizen as defined in Section 13000.


                    Amended Ch. 1292, Stats. 1993. Effective January 1, 1994.

                    Motorized Scooters: Manufacturer Disclosure

                    407.5. (a) A "motorized scooter" is any two-wheeled device that has handlebars, has a floorboard that is designed to be stood upon when riding, and is powered by an electric motor. This device may also have a driver seat that does not interfere with the ability of the rider to stand and ride and may also be designed to be powered by human propulsion. For purposes of this section, an electric personal assistive mobility device, as defined in Section 313, a motorcycle, as defined in Section 400, a motor-driven cycle, as defined in Section 405, or a motorized bicycle or moped, as defined in Section 406, is not a motorized scooter.

                    (b) A device meeting the definition in subdivision (a) that is powered by a source other than electrical power is also a motorized scooter.

                    (c) (1) A manufacturer of motorized scooters shall provide a disclosure to buyers that advises buyers that the buyers’ existing insurance policies may not provide coverage for these scooters and that the buyers should contact their insurance company or insurance agent to determine if coverage is provided.

                    (2) The disclosure required under paragraph (1) shall meet both of the following requirements:

                    (A) The disclosure shall be printed in not less than 14-point boldface type on a single sheet of paper that contains no information other than the disclosure.

                    (B) The disclosure shall include the following language in capital letters:

                    "YOUR INSURANCE POLICIES MAY NOT PROVIDE COVERAGE FOR ACCIDENTS INVOLVING THE USE OF THIS SCOOTER. TO DETERMINE IF COVERAGE IS PROVIDED, YOU SHOULD CONTACT YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY OR AGENT."

                    (d) (1) A manufacturer of motorized scooters shall provide a disclosure to a buyer that advises the buyer that the buyer may not modify or alter the exhaust system to cause that system to amplify or create an excessive noise, or to fail to meet applicable emission requirements.

                    (2) The disclosure required under paragraph (1) shall meet both of the following requirements:

                    (A) The disclosure shall be printed in not less than 14-point boldface type on a single sheet of paper that contains no information other than the disclosure.

                    (B) The disclosure shall include the following language in capital letters:

                    "YOU MAY NOT MODIFY OR ALTER THE EXHAUST SYSTEM OF THIS SCOOTER TO CAUSE IT TO AMPLIFY OR CREATE EXCESSIVE NOISE PER VEHICLE CODE SECTION 21226, OR TO FAIL TO MEET APPLICABLE EMISSION REQUIREMENTS PER VEHICLE CODE SECTION 27156."

                    (e) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2008, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute that is enacted before January 1, 2008, deletes or extends that date.

                    Added Sec. 29, Ch. 724, Stats. 1999. Effective January 1, 2000. Supersedes Ch. 722.
                    Amended Sec. 2, Ch. 979, Stats. 2002. Effective January 1 , 2003. March 1, 2003. Repeal operative January 1, 2008.
                    Amended Sec. 1, Ch. 755, Stats. 2004. Effective January 1, 2005.


                    NOTE: The preceding section becomes inoperative on January 1, 2008, at which time the following section becomes operative.

                    407.5 (a) A "motorized scooter" is any two-wheeled device that has handlebars, has a floorboard that is designed to be stood upon when riding, and is powered by an electric motor. This device may also have a driver seat that does not interfere with the ability of the rider to stand and ride and may also be designed to be powered by human propulsion. For purposes of this section, a motorcycle, as defined in Section 400, a motor-driven cycle, as defined in Section 405, or a motorized bicycle or moped, as defined in Section 406, is not a motorized scooter

                    (b) A device meeting the definition in subdivision (a) that is powered by a source other than electrical power is also a motorized scooter.

                    (c) (1) A manufacturer of motorized scooters shall provide a disclosure to buyers that advises buyers that the buyers’ existing insurance policies may not provide coverage for these scooters and that the buyers should contact their insurance company or insurance agent to determine if coverage is provided.

                    (2) The disclosure required under paragraph (1) shall meet both of the following requirements:

                    (A) The disclosure shall be printed in not less than 14-point boldface type on a single sheet of paper that contains no information other than the disclosure.

                    (B) The disclosure shall include the following language in capital letters:

                    "YOUR INSURANCE POLICIES MAY NOT PROVIDE COVERAGE FOR ACCIDENTS INVOLVING THE USE OF THIS SCOOTER. TO DETERMINE IF COVERAGE IS PROVIDED, YOU SHOULD CONTACT YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY OR AGENT."

                    (d) (1) A manufacturer of motorized scooters shall provide a disclosure to a buyer that advises the buyer that the buyer may not modify or alter the exhaust system to cause that system to amplify or create an excessive noise, or to fail to meet applicable emission requirements.

                    (2) The disclosure required under paragraph (1) shall meet both of the following requirements:

                    (A) The disclosure shall be printed in not less than 14-point boldface type on a single sheet of paper that contains no information other than the disclosure.

                    (B) The disclosure shall include the following language in capital letters:

                    "YOU MAY NOT MODIFY OR ALTER THE EXHAUST SYSTEM OF THIS SCOOTER TO CAUSE IT TO AMPLIFY OR CREATE EXCESSIVE NOISE PER VEHICLE CODE SECTION 21226, OR TO FAIL TO MEET APPLICABLE EMISSION REQUIREMENTS PER VEHICLE CODE 27156."

                    (e) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2008.

                    Added Sec. 3, Ch. 979, Stats. 2002. Effective January 1, 2003. Operative January1, 2008.
                    Amended Sec. 2, Ch. 755, Stats. 2004. Effective January 1, 2005.
                    If it is less than 150 cc it is not a motorcycle. The definitions above are clear. A motor scooter must have handlebars and "a floorboard that is designed to be stood upon when riding, and is powered by an electric motor."
                    Last edited by SgtCHP; 09-21-2008, 04:30 PM.
                    Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence!

                    [George Washington (1732 - 1799)]

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      + 1000 MSF for the first time rider. I learned so much; braking, friction zone, turning, etc.. I had a problem finding the friction zone and one of the teachers spent their time one on one with me until I got it down.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        All I can add is to Read The Manual. Pay attention to anything that sounds odd or sounds like a notion you may not believe. Here's a freebie:To turn right you push the handlebars left and lean right.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 417Lt View Post
                          All I can add is to Read The Manual. Pay attention to anything that sounds odd or sounds like a notion you may not believe. Here's a freebie:To turn right you push the handlebars left and lean right.
                          Where did you find that little gem????

                          PS Thanks all for the advice. I plan on doing the course in Colton but i was asking cause i presently work at a dealer in Redlands and get asked this alot.
                          Not affiliated with my avatar. My opinions are all mine and do not represent anybody else. All names are fictional and coincidental if there is someone in the world with aforementioned name.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Dunno if it was said already, but the MSF course also gives you a big discount on your bike insurance, in addition to waiving the skills test at the DMV.

                            Comment

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