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Post police officer jobs in AZ

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  • Post police officer jobs in AZ

    I’m close to ending my current law enforcement career and am looking for advice on another job once I retire. Does anyone have any experience on what field or employer to look at? I’m looking for somewhere within 30-45 minutes from Anthem. I’ve heard insurance companies or private eye work is a decent transition. Any other tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
    Last edited by spk20; 06-15-2020, 04:52 PM.

  • #2
    Have you thought of asset protection? I know stores such as Walmart will hire people directly as an Asset Protection Manager-Trainee. When I worked details for Walmart their AP manager was making high 70's not counting bonuses that could put him near 100k a year. Just a thought.

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    • #3
      Is that like the Loss Prevention jobs? I’ve briefly looked at some of those type of job postings but I had no idea they made that much. I might have to look into it a little more. Thanks for the info, I appreciate it!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by spk20 View Post
        Is that like the Loss Prevention jobs? I’ve briefly looked at some of those type of job postings but I had no idea they made that much. I might have to look into it a little more. Thanks for the info, I appreciate it!
        Yea, same thing just a different name. I’m sure the low level guys who do all the legwork get paid crap but I know the management side of loss prevention can make good money and most companies give bonuses based on how much product doesn’t come up missing during audit. Good luck!

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        • #5
          Insurance claims work usually requires very specialized expertise (arson, forgery, fraud, conspiracy, accident reconstruction are some examples). Also, the goals of insurance investigations are completely different than law enforcement; the object of the exercise is to limit claim losses rather than prosecution. Nearly all of this work is done by independent contractors, not insurance company employees, and budgetary considerations are the driving factor in the decision making process.

          Private investigations are also independent contractor territory with very few full-time paid employee positions. Very little criminal work involved, almost all civil cases or asset protection of some sort. Background investigations (business, investment, bonding, due diligence, etc) used to be a pretty good field, but today's information brokers and internet research firms have taken over nearly all of the old detective work. Entry level work in the PI world is likely to be as a part-time stringer for an established company with modest hourly compensation and tight purse strings on expenses.

          A few law firms have investigators on staff, but much of the work is more paralegal than investigative. A couple of guys I know have taken such positions and found themselves doing more messenger runs and process service than actual investigative work.

          Loss prevention work can be found in several fields such as industrial, transportation, retail, and others. The majority of these jobs are guard work, either fixed posts, monitoring security systems, or roving patrols, and compensation is seldom much more than minimum wages. Supervisory or management opportunities can be good gigs, but relatively few in number.

          There is an old joke that still makes the rounds: Private Investigator means ex-cop with business cards.

          What do you like to do? How hard do you want to work? How much money do you need to earn?

          I know a really great retired police lieutenant who owns a bail bonds company, probably a dozen agents working for him. Works his rear end off every day, all hours, but he makes a ton of money.

          I know a retired homicide detective who is very happy operating tour buses running tourists and business groups around.

          I retired in 1995. The real estate market was red hot and I purchased lots and built houses for several years. Then I ran a roofing company, which resulted in lots of contacts with insurance claims offices, and I ended up doing consulting work for claims and underwriting, which kept me very busy until the economy started circling the toilet bowl in 2007-2008. Then my old part-time sideline hobby-business (leather holsters and accessories) took off with a new website and customers in all 50 US states and 33 other countries. By 2015 osteo-arthritis and multiple orthopedic surgeries convinced me it was time to retire for good, so I sold the business and retired quite comfortably. I will soon hit the max age for "required minimum distributions" and be forced to start drawing on my retirement funds and investment accounts, so I will have to give myself a raise.

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          • #6
            Once again guys, thanks for the replies. I appreciate you taking the time to give some good advice. “Retired1995”, to answer your questions, I’m currently in a narcotics/firearms based investigative unit and have been since 2013. I anticipate finishing my career there so that’s the background I’ll have. I like the investigation side of things. I don’t want a security guard type position. I’d like to remain in the investigator type role but open to other jobs/career that have a hint of law enforcement type work. To be honest every few months I speak to different people and hear of jobs I never knew existed which prompted me to get ahead of the game and start gaining knowledge of what’s out there. I don’t mind the analyst type work or even consulting sounds very interesting although I don’t know much about what that entails. As far as how hard do I want to work, I’m not looking to work midnights or have a crazy schedule but I welcome a good days work. I find staying busy makes the day go fast so I’m definitely not looking for a job where I’m sitting around all day doing nothing. I don’t mind getting jobs and doing work ups and doing paperwork. After 15 years of craziness, I’m looking for a 9-5 kind of deal. Something that I know I start at “X” time and leave at “X” time everyday and I won’t have days off canceled or have to work weekends or 12 hr shifts on 6 hours notice. The 9-5 world sounds pretty appealing after living this life lately. As for the pay, I hoping to not “need” to make 100K/per year but I also don’t want to work hard and only make 60K if that makes sense. I’d be happy with something where the money fits the work and has good benefits. Good insurance will be important because I’ll only be 45 yes old so I won’t have any insurance coverage from my current employer. I’m trying to set myself up now so that whatever job I get after police is something enjoyable.

            Again thank you guys for your input and all future input that comes through!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by spk20 View Post
              Once again guys, thanks for the replies. I appreciate you taking the time to give some good advice. “Retired1995”, to answer your questions, I’m currently in a narcotics/firearms based investigative unit and have been since 2013. I anticipate finishing my career there so that’s the background I’ll have. I like the investigation side of things. I don’t want a security guard type position. I’d like to remain in the investigator type role but open to other jobs/career that have a hint of law enforcement type work. To be honest every few months I speak to different people and hear of jobs I never knew existed which prompted me to get ahead of the game and start gaining knowledge of what’s out there. I don’t mind the analyst type work or even consulting sounds very interesting although I don’t know much about what that entails. As far as how hard do I want to work, I’m not looking to work midnights or have a crazy schedule but I welcome a good days work. I find staying busy makes the day go fast so I’m definitely not looking for a job where I’m sitting around all day doing nothing. I don’t mind getting jobs and doing work ups and doing paperwork. After 15 years of craziness, I’m looking for a 9-5 kind of deal. Something that I know I start at “X” time and leave at “X” time everyday and I won’t have days off canceled or have to work weekends or 12 hr shifts on 6 hours notice. The 9-5 world sounds pretty appealing after living this life lately. As for the pay, I hoping to not “need” to make 100K/per year but I also don’t want to work hard and only make 60K if that makes sense. I’d be happy with something where the money fits the work and has good benefits. Good insurance will be important because I’ll only be 45 yes old so I won’t have any insurance coverage from my current employer. I’m trying to set myself up now so that whatever job I get after police is something enjoyable.

              Again thank you guys for your input and all future input that comes through!
              Insurance benefits are a huge consideration, especially at your age with 20 years to go until Medicare kicks in. Personally, with a rated service-connected disability I have full VA benefits, but my wife was another matter. When she was "downsized" at age 57 we started out with a COBRA group conversion ($340 per month), then the Affordable Care Act kicked in and her coverage went to $1342 per month. Medicare at 65 was a huge relief, even with a good supplemental plan we are saving nearly a grand every month.

              In that light, all of the independent contractor type positions that may turn up are not going to provide health insurance, and individual policies are much more expensive than you have been accustomed to as a LE employee. Think 2 or 3 times the premium for half the coverage and you won't be far wrong.

              One potential source comes to mind. Google the US Office of Personnel Management website and search through all the various Homeland Security positions, Inspector General positions, and facilities protection jobs. These areas have expanded a lot in recent years, employee benefits are quite good, and you have the opportunity to build a second retirement income. Many of these positions are federal law enforcement jobs, so you could potentially stay within an accustomed career field. Lots of retired cops and military have made the transition easily.

              Good luck.

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              • #8
                When I was in the Phoenix area last summer, I met a CSO that was a retired police officer from another state. He said he was doing it to get a second pension. It's something to consider.
                Last edited by Decided; 06-17-2020, 02:45 PM.
                Play stupid games and win stupid prizes. An all expenses paid trip with travel, meals, and accommodations included!

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