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  • Northerner
    replied
    The ones you're going to debate here are adamant in their opinion- trust me on this.
    Especially on the internet...

    Leave a comment:


  • Centurion44
    replied
    Originally posted by MisterJeff
    I've got nothing better to do I've convinced lots of LEO's that are my personal friends that drugs should be legalized, not because I love drugs, but because I appreciate the fact everyone should be as free as possible, which means free to do what you please as long as you aren't hurting or impinging upon the rights of others. I think that most policemen probably would be receptive to that argument.
    Probably. But only the ones that aren't vocal. The ones you're going to debate here are adamant in their opinion- trust me on this. The ones that agree with me are fairly quiet about it (usually).

    Personally, I think your engery would be better spent writing letters to your local representative and getting active politically. You won't do any good here, and the only think you'll do is inspire people to just call you names when they run out of logic for their arguement.

    Leave a comment:


  • Centurion44
    replied
    Jeff, this dead horse is officially whipped.

    Leave a comment:


  • Northerner
    replied
    I'd be in favor of legalizing pot. Why? Well, I see how aggressive, stupid and dangerous drunk folks are on a daily basis. On the contrary I've never seen that kind of behaviour by pot smokers...

    IMO alcohol really does a lot more harm than marihuana.


    Northerner

    Leave a comment:


  • ilpyungdad
    replied
    So interesting

    I think Leap have a desirable prospect to USA now, aand to the other countries in the future.

    US drug policy is punishment-centered and unrealistic.

    Front page of this site says US prison doesn't aim to not-treatment.

    Leave a comment:


  • Medea
    replied
    I believe we need to extend the courtesy,that is applied to the working class,if you want to control this problem or at least fund other agencys,TAX, TAX, TAX, TAX ,TAX, and Tax the Drug Trade,Drug Dealers,Prostitution and all other stores that sell Alcohol & Tobacco allow them to pay a Professional Privelge Tax start out with $ 400 with increase over 5 years to a top out Tax of $1,000 and for all those addicts who end up on goverment assisted programs again hit them with another Tax for cleaning up their A**!Why should I A LAW ABiding Citizen and Property owner be Taxed to house all these DA who willingly go out and commit crimes against the citizens of the community's we live in.Use the tax money to fund LE at city,county,state,& federal levels.IMHO

    Leave a comment:


  • vsp645
    replied
    The Big Picture.

    As a citizen of this great Republic the major concerns I have about legalizing such damaging substances is the impact of it's legalization in other arenas: Health care, insurance premiums, highway safety and presumptive limits, damage to the workforce of our country, malpractice lawsuits, ease of availability to our children, welfare and disability claims, can we as a country even begin to think we can afford to render public assistance to those that disenfranchise themselves to reckless drug binging?


    just my .02

    Leave a comment:


  • vsp645
    replied
    I like brother Kelly's plan.

    [QUOTE=1sgkelly]My two year plan:

    First six months; if we catch you with enough for a trafficking charge we shoot you.

    Second six months; if we catch you with any we shoot you.

    Second year; clean up any loose ends.

    Crime down 65% or more, safer to walk the streets

    Leave a comment:


  • Centurion44
    replied
    Originally posted by pkagel
    You sound like a thinker and not a blind follower, good to have you here. I happen to agree to all but point #3. What is your industry since your handle is "not a cop?"
    I agree with Not-A. I deal with many young adults who would probably open up to me more and be less affraid of me if they weren't so blantently worried I was going to bust them for the pot I can almost see in their pocket.

    It doesn't really hinder my job that much, but it would probably make cops more "hip" in the eyes of the young adults and more liberal crowds.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Don
    replied
    Originally posted by Centurion44
    I agree, but it's hard to convince a polititian, for some reason.
    Cause of the State and Federal Tax codes!

    Leave a comment:


  • not_a_cop
    replied
    You sound like a thinker and not a blind follower, good to have you here. I happen to agree to all but point #3. What is your industry since your handle is "not a cop?"
    Thanks for your kind words. I'm actually an electrical engineer--it's not that close to LE, but you guys have such an interesting board going here...

    I suppose I could have worded the third point a little better, but what I really meant is that part of the cost in enforcing anything will be the negative opinions of whomever you're chasing after. It may not be right, but it is part of human nature, and something that should be considered (especially when the offenders number in the tens of millions).

    Leave a comment:


  • pkagel
    replied
    You sound like a thinker and not a blind follower, good to have you here. I happen to agree to all but point #3. What is your industry since your handle is "not a cop?"

    Originally posted by not_a_cop
    Not to drag the thread back on-topic or anything, but I can think of three points that could be made:

    1 -The fact that drugs are illegal takes law and order almost completely out of the equation. You end up with a whole industry of people who cannot call the police--making them targets for all types of rip-offs. This lack of LE presence tends to be compensated for by "street justice".

    2 -When something people want is banned, its price will go toward infinity. We now have substances that *should* be almost valueless selling for more than their weight in gold.

    3 -I suspect that our drug laws (due to the huge number of users, especially for pot) are a major factor in LEOs not being liked / respected by the public. It's hard to get a warm fuzzy feeling for something that you percieve to be a threat.

    4- Now, I'm not saying that drugs should be legal, but that there is a real trade-off in fighting to eliminate them--nothing in life is free. In most cases, the substance is so damaging that the choice is easy. When a drug poses no real health risks, though (and there is at least one that consistently fails to produce any of its "known" side effects), it's hard to justify the societal side effects of screwing with the laws of economics.

    Leave a comment:


  • not_a_cop
    replied
    Not to drag the thread back on-topic or anything, but I can think of three points that could be made:

    -The fact that drugs are illegal takes law and order almost completely out of the equation. You end up with a whole industry of people who cannot call the police--making them targets for all types of rip-offs. This lack of LE presence tends to be compensated for by "street justice".

    -When something people want is banned, its price will go toward infinity. We now have substances that *should* be almost valueless selling for more than their weight in gold.

    -I suspect that our drug laws (due to the huge number of users, especially for pot) are a major factor in LEOs not being liked / respected by the public. It's hard to get a warm fuzzy feeling for something that you percieve to be a threat.

    Now, I'm not saying that drugs should be legal, but that there is a real trade-off in fighting to eliminate them--nothing in life is free. In most cases, the substance is so damaging that the choice is easy. When a drug poses no real health risks, though (and there is at least one that consistently fails to produce any of its "known" side effects), it's hard to justify the societal side effects of screwing with the laws of economics.

    Leave a comment:


  • pkagel
    replied
    So, what is the difference between these two besides ones an *** and one is an elephant that stomps everything??

    Originally posted by savage4presiden
    republican or democrat, .

    Leave a comment:


  • savage4presiden
    replied
    Originally posted by Centurion44
    No. But mob rule is dangerous, and you know it. If the majority ruled how long would schools in the south have stayed segregated? How long would public and privates business been divided up according to race? If majority ruled, how much more in taxes would we be paying right now? And if the majority ruled, would we not be a socialist country right about now?
    All the examples you gave were bills that were passed by congress with a majority. I hate socialism as much as you. However, I think that regardless of which majority we have, either republican or democrat, they are still taking us closer to socialism every day.

    Leave a comment:

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