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Just a friendly reminder but burning the US flag is not advisable at LSU

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  • FNA209
    replied
    Originally posted by OneAdam12 View Post
    The maintenance guy does it.
    Nope, the cops always do it. I'm curious as to what some of them do when it's required though. I'm guessing it's not done the right way. That's sad.

    Leave a comment:


  • OneAdam12
    replied
    Originally posted by FNA209 View Post
    I kind of agree with most of that, but I still have the proper protocol deeply ingrained and try my best to treat the flag as honorably as I can. It means a lot to me. On the day of my grandfather's death, I fly his flag used on his casket. On the day, my uncle died, I use his; on the day my father died, I use his. I have a replica of the flag as it was in 1864 (35 stars) and fly that on the day of my great-great grandfather death.

    I find a certain sense of connection with the past doing that. Those flags are treated with the most respect I can give them. I try to treat every flag I handle the same way.

    I both sigh and wince every time I have an email at the beginning of shift that says we have to lower the flags at sunrise for another fallen soldier. I sigh because it's a duty I must do. I wince for two reasons. One is because of the thought of the fallen. The other is very self-centered. It means I have to do something that is uncomfortable and also something that is "inconvenient". After all, it may be raining or cold and storming, but we are directed to perform this task. Yet, I drag myself and another officer to those flag poles when it is required. We also do it the right way. First we lower the institutional flag. Then we march past the US Flag pole and lower the State Flag flag. Then we go back to the middle and lower the US Flag.

    After that, I call him to attention and order a hand salute which we both do. Some of my officers question the ritual, but I feel it's the proper way. Anytime I'm at work, we do that. I don't know what is done when I'm not there and the message is followed.
    The maintenance guy does it.
    Last edited by OneAdam12; 06-06-2011, 11:46 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • FNA209
    replied
    Originally posted by Hoosier_Boy View Post
    If someone I worked with pulled such an ignorant stunt as to burn the American flag that most of my co-workers risked their life to defend...

    I would kick them in the nuts... If the people I work with didn't get there first.
    LMAO.. and I'll laughing..

    Leave a comment:


  • john.cassidy1
    replied
    Actions have consequences. If a small group of KKK idiots go walking into downtown Atlanta and begin exercising their 1st Amendment rights by screaming certain racial epithets at the top of their lungs, I don't think that would end well. Do they have the right? Sure. Do they deserve an epic beatdown? No. I still don't like their odds.

    Leave a comment:


  • FNA209
    replied
    Originally posted by reils49 View Post
    I don't have much use for flag burners and could care less about their "free speech" because I don't want to hear what they have to say. Having said that, I'm also not 100% by the book when it comes to flying my flag. There's a good article on the flag in the current issue of American Handgunner, that sums it up pretty well.

    http://fmgpublications.ipaperus.com/...gunner/AHJA11/

    Its on page 105.
    I kind of agree with most of that, but I still have the proper protocol deeply ingrained and try my best to treat the flag as honorably as I can. It means a lot to me. On the day of my grandfather's death, I fly his flag used on his casket. On the day, my uncle died, I use his; on the day my father died, I use his. I have a replica of the flag as it was in 1864 (35 stars) and fly that on the day of my great-great grandfather death.

    I find a certain sense of connection with the past doing that. Those flags are treated with the most respect I can give them. I try to treat every flag I handle the same way.

    I both sign and wince every time I have an email at the beginning of shift that says we have to lower the flags at sunrise for another fallen soldier. I sign because it's a duty I must do. I wince for two reasons. One is because of the thought of the fallen. The other is very self-centered. It means I have to do something that is uncomfortable and also something that is "inconvenient". After all, it may be raining or cold and storming, but we are directed to perform this task. Yet, I drag myself and another officer to those flag poles when it is required. We also do it the right way. First we lower the institutional flag. Then we march past the US Flag pole and lower the State Flag flag. Then we go back to the middle and lower the US Flag.

    After that, I call him to attention and order a hand salute which we both do. Some of my officers question the ritual, but I feel it's the proper way. Anytime I'm at work, we do that. I don't know what is done when I'm not there and the message is followed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hokie13
    replied
    Originally posted by reils49 View Post
    I don't have much use for flag burners and could care less about their "free speech" because I don't want to hear what they have to say. Having said that, I'm also not 100% by the book when it comes to flying my flag. There's a good article on the flag in the current issue of American Handgunner, that sums it up pretty well.

    http://fmgpublications.ipaperus.com/...gunner/AHJA11/

    Its on page 105.
    Great article, loved it.

    Leave a comment:


  • LA DEP
    replied
    Originally posted by -A- View Post
    For the military guys... If a flag is burned at say at a (or near a) military instalation or even DC, couldn't that be seen as an act of treason?
    Exactly HOW is this 'an act of treason'?

    Leave a comment:


  • -A-
    replied
    For the military guys... If a flag is burned at say at a (or near a) military instalation or even DC, couldn't that be seen as an act of treason?

    Leave a comment:


  • reils49
    replied
    I don't have much use for flag burners and could care less about their "free speech" because I don't want to hear what they have to say. Having said that, I'm also not 100% by the book when it comes to flying my flag. There's a good article on the flag in the current issue of American Handgunner, that sums it up pretty well.

    http://fmgpublications.ipaperus.com/...gunner/AHJA11/

    Its on page 105.

    Leave a comment:


  • MD11pilot
    replied
    Originally posted by eyesopen View Post
    Very true but on the other side of the coin there were a lot of things done during the WWII era which we would undeniably consider unconstitutional now. Interning the majority of Japanese American citizens while not interning many German American citizens (perhaps because "they look like us"), for example. The suppression of civil rights of black people nationwide but primarily in the south. Segregated military.

    Does not the Patriot Guard handle a-holes showing even more disrespect than flag burning in one of the classiest ways there is? And that group is primarily made up of vets. God bless them.
    Even then women were employed as infantry and more famously as snipers by the Soviets while here they served more under auxiliary or medical roles. But I do enjoy seeing someone getting heckled for even considering burning the flag.
    Last edited by MD11pilot; 05-19-2011, 06:24 PM. Reason: minor grammar

    Leave a comment:


  • eyesopen
    replied
    Originally posted by EmmaPeel View Post
    Can you imagine someone burning the flag in NY City the day after 9/11? Or in NYC during WWII? Yep, people have the LEGAL right, however.....
    Very true but on the other side of the coin there were a lot of things done during the WWII era which we would undeniably consider unconstitutional now. Interning the majority of Japanese American citizens while not interning many German American citizens (perhaps because "they look like us"), for example. The suppression of civil rights of black people nationwide but primarily in the south. Segregated military.

    Does not the Patriot Guard handle a-holes showing even more disrespect than flag burning in one of the classiest ways there is? And that group is primarily made up of vets. God bless them.

    Leave a comment:


  • EmmaPeel
    replied
    Originally posted by SRT936 View Post
    Wow, really?? How the hell did you make that leap?

    First off, if I'm working, I'll stand there, swallowing my pride, while you disrespect the symbol of everything that gives you the right to do it. I'll even protect you from private citizens who would want to do you harm.

    However, if I'm standing there as a private citizen, one who has served on foreign battlefields and lost close friends in the pursuit of those freedoms, I am not as likely to be so restrained. You have every right to express yourself but don't delude yourself into believing that exercising your rights is without consequence. That's the point I'm making.

    Lastly, I'm not here to give you a positive message. I'm not here to kiss your boo-boo's and tell you its going to be ok. I'm not here to make the world play fair or sing kum-ba-ya with you. I'm here to do violence on your behalf and stand in the gap so that you can go on "expressing" yourself without having to pay any of the cost.
    I know what ya mean, SRT. I think there are a lot of things we can do within legal bounds as part of "those consequences" you talk about, but to be honest, if someone were to burn a flag in front of me without my having time to process it, I'm not sure how I'd react actually. During one of my times in Iraq, I worked on the top floor of a building called Freedom Towers right next to the MSH unit. I even had this huge area outside my window... some of us would routinely climb out with some chairs and smoke cigars (since General Order #1 didn't allow drinking) while looking at the Iraqi skyline at sunset (which was beautiful) but the other 60% of the time I would watch the Medical Blackhawks fly in and offload the wounded behind the hospital. The emotion is just as raw whenever I think about it and I can't say I wouldn't punch the a****** in the face. I would never plan to do it but can't say what I'd do if caught by surprise.

    Can you imagine someone burning the flag in NY City the day after 9/11? Or in NYC during WWII? Yep, people have the LEGAL right, however.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Indy
    replied
    Originally posted by KJB View Post
    I have no problem with people burning our flag, provided they wrap themselves in it first.
    Beat me to it!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • OneAdam12
    replied
    I hate butt holes like this who abuse their God given right to freedom of speech by burning the U.S. flag.

    That being said, He has the right to do so.

    In fact, burning the flag is a proper method of disposing of one. It is just the manner in which he does it is disturbing to me.

    Protesters at the burning were wearing clothes made to resemble the flag. A flag etiquette violation.
    Some protesters allowed their flags to touch the ground, another violation.
    I'm sure afterward some flags were trashed or incorrectly stored.

    According to the Flag Code, a flag is a flag or anything "by which the average person seeing the same without deliberation may believe the same to represent the flag."

    The United States Post office is guilty of desecrating a flag.

    Section 8e. of the Flag Code reads, "The flag should never be ... used ... in such a manner as to permit it to be easily torn, soiled, or damaged in any way." Section 8g. reads, "The flag should never have placed upon it, nor on any part of it, nor attached to it any mark ... of any nature." 8i. reads, "[The flag] should not be printed or otherwise impressed on ... anything that is designed for temporary use and discard."

    Everybody has probably desecrated the American flag at one time or another.

    Of course we have a burn ban going on right now so he would probably have been arrested.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rifleguy
    replied
    I know I missed this discussion from working late but I"ll add something to this. The Baton Rouge area and LSU in particularly has a very heavy veteran population more so than many other places in the country. You will find it quite difficult to meet some one that does not have any ties whether by family or friend who was or is involved with the military. Sadly for many locals the American flag is a symbol seen on the coffins of friends and loved ones. Whether we agree that flag burning is a right or a foul display, there is a time and place for everything. Burning the flag at a school that is celebrating a tremendous victory over terrorism with the demise of Bin Laden is neither the time nor the place.

    Leave a comment:

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