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  • Sarah Palin trashes National Endowment for the Arts

    This piece attacks Palin with the usual liberal refrain that it is only a small part of the budget. That is hardly a justification for wasting money. I think that the National Endowment for the Arts should not be funded even in good times, because what constitutes art is very subjective, and much of what the government funds is trash -- and often trash that is offensive to many people. There is no shortage of "art". Just go to the Museum of Contemporary Art and see what collectors pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for.

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/cult...-the-arts.html

    Television commentator and half-term Alaska governor Sarah Palin trashed the National Endowment for the Arts recently, describing the agency as "frivolous" in a Thursday interview on a Fox News talk show.

    "NPR, National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, all those kind of frivolous things that government shouldn't be in the business of funding with tax dollars -- those should all be on the chopping block as we talk about the $14-trillion debt that we're going to hand to our kids and our grandkids," Palin told right-wing host Sean Hannity. "Yes, those are the type of things that for more than one reason need to be cut."

    Palin did not elaborate on what the other reasons might be for chopping the NEA budget. But the government of every major civilization in world history has also prominently funded the arts.

    The comment about the NEA came during a discussion of the ailing U.S. economy. Palin is certainly conversant with frivolous activity, but her grasp of the economy is weak.

    Debt reduction would barely be affected by penciling out the small federal arts agency, which currently operates on a $161-million annual budget. Palin's support of a federal subsidy for the notorious "bridge to nowhere" in her state became a campaign issue when she ran for vice president on the 2008 Republican ticket. That local project carried a price tag of $223 million.

    "Reality is we have 15 million Americans who are out of work," said Palin. Nationally, the nonprofit arts and culture industry supports 5.7 million jobs and generates $166.2 billion in annual economic activity, according to Americans for the Arts. The NEA is one linchpin in that sizable economy.

    In the interview Palin made no statement advocating similar budget cuts to her home state as she recommended for the NEA, which is also in the cross hairs of Washington's Republican leadership. Palin's Alaska gets $1.84 in federal spending for every dollar its citizens pay in federal taxes.
    Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored. -- Aldous Huxley
    Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity. -- Albert Einstein

  • #2
    I don't like Palin, and obviously she's a hypocrite; but really, do people think there's a magic bullet to our budget problem?

    A large part of the solution is in the little things - shutting down programs of questionable value, making services more efficient, judicious cutting of budgets, etc.

    That means cutting programs like the NEA, and also getting rid of pork barrel spending like the bridge to nowhere.

    Comment


    • #3
      If the expenditure is for your favorite program, it is indispensable. Or perhaps the idea is that if solving your problem is impossible, you should spend arbitrarily much money.
      Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored. -- Aldous Huxley
      Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity. -- Albert Einstein

      Comment


      • #4
        My my the libs are getting nasty. More than usual, which is considerable. They know that NPR is on the chopping block and the NEA is on the list. Every other major country did it so we should do it too? How many other countries have run up 14 trillion in debt?

        It's funny that he thinks that he can save a useless government program by attacking someone, but what's new?

        Comment


        • #5
          Sarah in 2012!
          The All New
          2013
          BBQ and Goldfish Pond Club
          Sully - IAM Rand - JasperST - L1 - The Tick - EmmaPeel - Columbus - LA Dep - SgtSlaughter - OneAdam12 - Retired96 - Iowa #1603
          - M1Garand

          (any BBQ and Goldfish Pond member may nominate another user for membership but just remember ..... this ain't no weenie roast!)



          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by DAL View Post
            This piece attacks Palin with the usual liberal refrain that it is only a small part of the budget. That is hardly a justification for wasting money. I think that the National Endowment for the Arts should not be funded even in good times, because what constitutes art is very subjective, and much of what the government funds is trash -- and often trash that is offensive to many people. There is no shortage of "art". Just go to the Museum of Contemporary Art and see what collectors pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for.

            http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/cult...-the-arts.html

            Television commentator and half-term Alaska governor Sarah Palin trashed the National Endowment for the Arts recently, describing the agency as "frivolous" in a Thursday interview on a Fox News talk show.

            "NPR, National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, all those kind of frivolous things that government shouldn't be in the business of funding with tax dollars -- those should all be on the chopping block as we talk about the $14-trillion debt that we're going to hand to our kids and our grandkids," Palin told right-wing host Sean Hannity. "Yes, those are the type of things that for more than one reason need to be cut."

            Palin did not elaborate on what the other reasons might be for chopping the NEA budget. But the government of every major civilization in world history has also prominently funded the arts.

            The comment about the NEA came during a discussion of the ailing U.S. economy. Palin is certainly conversant with frivolous activity, but her grasp of the economy is weak.

            Debt reduction would barely be affected by penciling out the small federal arts agency, which currently operates on a $161-million annual budget. Palin's support of a federal subsidy for the notorious "bridge to nowhere" in her state became a campaign issue when she ran for vice president on the 2008 Republican ticket. That local project carried a price tag of $223 million.

            "Reality is we have 15 million Americans who are out of work," said Palin. Nationally, the nonprofit arts and culture industry supports 5.7 million jobs and generates $166.2 billion in annual economic activity, according to Americans for the Arts. The NEA is one linchpin in that sizable economy.

            In the interview Palin made no statement advocating similar budget cuts to her home state as she recommended for the NEA, which is also in the cross hairs of Washington's Republican leadership. Palin's Alaska gets $1.84 in federal spending for every dollar its citizens pay in federal taxes.
            I don't recall her "bridge to nowhere" being frivolous

            Remember when McCollum (D-MN) recommended cutting the $7 million a year that the Gov spending on sponsoring NASCAR for Army advertisements....
            weird that wasn't frivolous

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 1042 Trooper View Post
              Sarah in 2012!
              I think there are far better republican candidates than Palin for 2012 but both the democrat and republican candidate pool is rather murky.
              Life is what you make of it

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DAL View Post
                This piece attacks Palin with the usual liberal refrain that it is only a small part of the budget. That is hardly a justification for wasting money. I think that the National Endowment for the Arts should not be funded even in good times, because what constitutes art is very subjective, and much of what the government funds is trash -- and often trash that is offensive to many people. There is no shortage of "art". Just go to the Museum of Contemporary Art and see what collectors pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for.

                http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/cult...-the-arts.html

                Television commentator and half-term Alaska governor Sarah Palin trashed the National Endowment for the Arts recently, describing the agency as "frivolous" in a Thursday interview on a Fox News talk show.

                "NPR, National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, all those kind of frivolous things that government shouldn't be in the business of funding with tax dollars -- those should all be on the chopping block as we talk about the $14-trillion debt that we're going to hand to our kids and our grandkids," Palin told right-wing host Sean Hannity. "Yes, those are the type of things that for more than one reason need to be cut."

                Palin did not elaborate on what the other reasons might be for chopping the NEA budget. But the government of every major civilization in world history has also prominently funded the arts.

                The comment about the NEA came during a discussion of the ailing U.S. economy. Palin is certainly conversant with frivolous activity, but her grasp of the economy is weak.

                Debt reduction would barely be affected by penciling out the small federal arts agency, which currently operates on a $161-million annual budget. Palin's support of a federal subsidy for the notorious "bridge to nowhere" in her state became a campaign issue when she ran for vice president on the 2008 Republican ticket. That local project carried a price tag of $223 million.

                "Reality is we have 15 million Americans who are out of work," said Palin. Nationally, the nonprofit arts and culture industry supports 5.7 million jobs and generates $166.2 billion in annual economic activity, according to Americans for the Arts. The NEA is one linchpin in that sizable economy.

                In the interview Palin made no statement advocating similar budget cuts to her home state as she recommended for the NEA, which is also in the cross hairs of Washington's Republican leadership. Palin's Alaska gets $1.84 in federal spending for every dollar its citizens pay in federal taxes.
                I think the assessment of Palin is right on.
                She is being a political opportunist in the things she wishes to target, in the name of deficit reduction.
                not to mention a complete hypocrite

                And even if DAL and Palin don't like the NEA, that doesn't mean millions of other Americans don't benefit from that funding.
                In the end, conservatives don't give a damn if someone else suffers from their meddling
                the irony of course, is that they think they are doing everyone a big favor

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 1042 Trooper View Post
                  Sarah in 2012!
                  I really, really hope she runs

                  but i doubt she will. She can't handle the criticism.

                  She's much happier only venturing into safe havens like Fox News, or twitter or facebook, and shrilly playing monday morning quarterback/harpie
                  Of course, she doesn't have the balls to get on the field herself

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 1042 Trooper View Post
                    Sarah in 2012!
                    And than Allen West in 2013 when she quits!
                    This show is awesome, wrapped in supercool and smothered in bitchin. The only way it could be cooler is if he was riding a unicorn or something.

                    M-11

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I don't see how any Americans, other than those who give or get the handouts, benefit from the NEA. There are plenty of art museums funded by wealthy philanthropists who also support the arts. They are better at deciding what is worthy art than the government is.

                      And the government should not be telling us what is or is not art. Nor should it pay for political editorializing, left or right.
                      Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored. -- Aldous Huxley
                      Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity. -- Albert Einstein

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DAL View Post
                        I don't see how any Americans, other than those who give or get the handouts, benefit from the NEA. There are plenty of art museums funded by wealthy philanthropists who also support the arts. They are better at deciding what is worthy art than the government is.

                        And the government should not be telling us what is or is not art. Nor should it pay for political editorializing, left or right.
                        the function of the NEA is not to "decide what is art"
                        maybe research their mission a little before judging ?

                        The NEA is the largest annual national funder of the arts in the United States, with a budget of $167.5 million for FY 2010. NEA grants have a powerful multiplying effect, with each grant dollar typically generating up to seven times more in matching resources.
                        Since its establishment, the NEA has awarded more than $4 billion in funding, including early support for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial design competition, the Sundance Film Festival, Spoleto Festival USA, PBS’s Great Performances series, and the American Film Institute.


                        yeah. They helped kick-off funding for the Vietnam Vets Memorial...
                        clearly useless

                        lots of jobs, lots of money spin off those events....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dlo View Post
                          the function of the NEA is not to "decide what is art"
                          maybe research their mission a little before judging ?

                          The NEA is the largest annual national funder of the arts in the United States, with a budget of $167.5 million for FY 2010. NEA grants have a powerful multiplying effect, with each grant dollar typically generating up to seven times more in matching resources.
                          Since its establishment, the NEA has awarded more than $4 billion in funding, including early support for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial design competition, the Sundance Film Festival, Spoleto Festival USA, PBS’s Great Performances series, and the American Film Institute.


                          yeah. They helped kick-off funding for the Vietnam Vets Memorial...
                          clearly useless

                          lots of jobs, lots of money spin off those events....
                          Why should we subsidize film festivals? Is there a shortage of film festivals? How do you decide which artists and art centers merit subsidy?

                          2011 Grant Awards: Access to Artistic Excellence

                          [ March 11, 2010 deadline ]

                          Artists Communities | Dance | Design | Folk & Traditional Arts | Literature
                          Local Arts Agencies | Media Arts | Museums | Music | Musical Theater
                          Opera | Presenting | Theater | Visual Arts

                          Some details of the projects listed below are subject to change, contingent upon prior Endowment approval.
                          Artists Communities

                          18th Street Arts Complex (aka 18th Street Arts Center)
                          Santa Monica, CA
                          $30,000
                          To support artist residencies. American and international artists of various disciplines will be hosted for periods ranging from one month to one year. Artists will participate in open-studio visits and exhibitions or performances.

                          Alliance of Artists Communities (Consortium)
                          Providence, RI
                          $30,000
                          To support staff salaries and documentation of a series of residencies for young, emerging Arab authors, resulting in a publication, in partnership with La Napoule Art Foundation.

                          Alliance of Artists Communities
                          Providence, RI
                          $50,000
                          To support forums and workshops at the 20th anniversary conference of the Alliance of Artist Communities and six other sites. The programs will encourage best practices and educate people about artist communities.

                          Anderson Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, Inc.
                          Red Wing, MN
                          $10,000
                          To support residencies for visual artists and writers. Ranging from two to four weeks, residencies will provide uninterrupted time and space for artists to advance a work-in-progress or initiate new work.

                          Anderson Ranch Arts Foundation
                          Snowmass Village, CO
                          $15,000
                          To support an artist residency program. While in residence, visual and media artists will receive studio space, equipment and materials, meals, housing, travel, and exhibition opportunities. Also included is an optional structure of critical study, such as studio visits with faculty, visiting artists, and critics, and public lectures by visiting artists and critics.

                          Art Students League of New York, Inc.
                          New York, NY
                          $10,000
                          To support a residency program for professional and emerging artists and art educators. Artists will receive a room, one meal a day, a private studio, shared large studio space, access to classes and instructors, trips to Manhattan arts locations, and the opportunity for an open studios event at the end of their residency.

                          Atlantic Center for the Arts, Inc.
                          New Smyrna Beach, FL
                          $40,000
                          To support interdisciplinary residencies for emerging and mid-career artists. Master artists will collaborate with resident artists in visual arts, literature, music, and the performing arts.

                          Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts
                          Omaha, NE
                          $50,000
                          To support residencies for artists to create new work. Participating artists will receive housing, workspace, technical assistance, and a monthly stipend for two- to four-month residencies.

                          Byrd Hoffman Watermill Foundation (aka Watermill Center)
                          Brooklyn, NY
                          $20,000
                          To support artist residencies and community programs at the Watermill Center. Emerging artists and performing groups from a range of backgrounds will receive opportunities to develop new work. The project also includes education programs for area schools, open rehearsals, and artist talks available free-of-charge to the community.

                          Corporation of Yaddo (aka Yaddo)
                          Saratoga Springs, NY
                          $25,000
                          To support month-long residencies for mid-career artists at Yaddo. Artists from various disciplines will receive housing, meals, and a fully equipped studio or workspace.

                          Djerassi Resident Artists Program
                          Woodside, CA
                          $25,000
                          To support artist residencies. The project will provide studios, living accommodations, meals, and professional assistance to American visual, media, performing, and literary artists.

                          Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Inc.
                          Provincetown, MA
                          $15,000
                          To support the Winter Fellowship Program for Emerging Artists and Writers. The project will provide living accommodations, studios, and monthly stipends to 20 selected poets, fiction writers, and visual artists.

                          Friends of A Studio in the Woods (aka A Studio in the Woods (ASITW))
                          New Orleans, LA
                          $10,000
                          To support the residency program Changing Landscape: A Dialogue Between Arts and the Environment. Lodging, meals, materials expenses, transportation, stipends, and studio space in a rustic setting will be provided. Up to five literary, visual, and performing artists will present their work to the public through an on-site salon and performance presentation.

                          Hambidge Center for Creative Arts & Sciences, Inc.
                          Rabun Gap, GA
                          $10,000
                          To support the Hambidge New Artist Initiative residencies. The initiative will provide residencies to both emerging and established artists with a special focus on targeting applicants who broaden diversity.

                          Headlands Center for the Arts
                          Sausalito, CA
                          $45,000
                          To support residencies for emerging and mid-career artists. Resident artists will receive stipends, room, meals, travel expenses, and studio space in which to create new work, investigate surrounding communities, and share ideas and their works with other artists.

                          Hedgebrook Foundation
                          Langley, WA
                          $15,000
                          To support the Writers in Residence program. No-cost residencies will be targeted to women writers at the retreat located on Whidbey Island.

                          Hermitage Artist Retreat, Inc.
                          Englewood, FL
                          $10,000
                          To support artist residencies. Participants will be drawn from accomplished playwrights, composers, and creative artists from other disciplines with the lead artist receiving a substantial commissioning fee to produce a major work.

                          Kala Institute (aka Kala Art Institute)
                          Berkeley, CA
                          $40,000
                          To support artist residencies in visual arts, video, performance, digital media, and book arts. American and international artists will receive stipends, technical support, and access to working facilities.

                          MacDowell Colony, Inc.
                          Peterborough, NH
                          $40,000
                          To support residencies for artists who have not previously had residencies at the MacDowell Colony. Twelve composers, writers, media artists, visual artists, interdisciplinary artists, and architects from all regions of the United States will be invited to reside on the grounds of the MacDowell Colony and create or complete works.

                          McColl Center for Visual Art
                          Charlotte, NC
                          $30,000
                          To support residencies for visual artists. Participating artists will receive housing, workspace, technical assistance, transportation costs, a materials budget, and a monthly stipend for a three-month residency.

                          Millay Colony for the Arts, Inc.
                          Austerlitz, NY
                          $15,000
                          To support artist residencies for composers, writers, and visual artists. Six artists will receive one-month residencies between April and November, enabling 48 artists to be served.

                          Montalvo Association (aka Montalvo Arts Center)
                          Saratoga, CA
                          $30,000
                          To support the Lucas Artists Program, an artist residency program at the Montalvo Arts Center. Artists working in the performing, visual, and literary arts also will have the opportunity to present or exhibit their work at Villa Montalvo and other Bay Area venues.

                          PlatteForum (Consortium)
                          Denver, CO
                          $15,000
                          To support The Confluence Project, a shared artist-in-residence program between PlatteForum and the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver. The artists in residence will work with teens from PlatteForum's ArtLab and MCA Denver's Teen Council.

                          Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Inc.
                          Skowhegan, ME
                          $20,000
                          To support a residency program for emerging visual artists. Artists will receive a private studio, full room and board, and weekly private and group critiques by a faculty of leading professional artists.

                          Virginia Center for the Creative Arts (aka VCCA)
                          Amherst, VA
                          $10,000
                          To support international artist residencies. The project will support American artists participating in two- to six-week residencies abroad and international artists residencies in the United States.
                          Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored. -- Aldous Huxley
                          Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity. -- Albert Einstein

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            http://www.americanartists.org/Artic...al_artists.htm

                            NEA, Regional, and Private Support for Individual Artists
                            by Jules White

                            While direct grants to individuals awarded by the National Endowment for the Arts are not as numerous, there are many grants available through regional arts councils and private funding, as well as through state arts agencies. This article focuses on NEA, regional arts agency, and private grants to individuals.

                            The 2000 budget proposal of the National Endowment for the Arts ("Challenge America") before Congress and spearheaded by William Ivey, Chairman is project oriented and emphasizes giving to non-profit agencies who in turn give to projects and to individuals. The appropriations history of the NEA, as stated by the Office of Policy Research and Analysis, ranges from 2.9 million in 1966 to 174 million in 1991 and 97.6 million today.

                            In 1996 Congress eliminated most of the NEA’s funding for individuals-except in literature and in Heritage and J*** Masters (E-mail Cherie Simon March 30 2000). The current policies of the NEA concerning supporting individual artists is summed up in a letter from Saralyn Reece Hardy (Director of Museums and Visual Arts, NEA):

                            The National Endowment for the Arts is prohibited by Congress to fund individual artists except in literature and folk arts. Therefore we do not make direct grants to visual artists. However, we do fund many projects around the country that support artists in a variety of ways-commissions, residencies, exhibition fees, installations, support services, publications, and planning/consulting.

                            In the future, I believe that more and more community arts organizations will decide to work with artists in deep and long-term ways. In other words, to use a very tired word-partnerships with artists to create work within communities. At the National Endowment, we are discussing what kind of funding and other activities can support artists as our most important living cultural resource. How can we support artists, thinkers, and encourage artist/organization relationships? This may eventually evolve into special grants or project support for places that want to work closely with artists who are pursuing their own work. For now, we are thinking and planning, with the first steps including a series of listening sessions with individual artists and other people from the field. This will be happening within the next year. The big picture is that while there are many many creative people working in both the for profit and the not for profit sectors, we need to create a climate where the process of communicating meaning and value is nurtured. I heard Susan Sontag speak last night and she made the point that it is the expressive part of human beings that is the most beautiful. I agree.

                            In terms of the impact of not giving to individual artists-I think the area of greatest loss is the recognized confirmation of artists that a national grant affords. I do not know how it is affecting specific artists directly, but I do think that the country needs a constant reminder of the very particular gifts of individual creative people. In visual arts, there are some other foundations that have picked up the gauntlet...Creative Capital, Pew Foundation, Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation and others. Still I would venture to say that our challenge is to; be sure that the artist has a voice and presence to assure the broadest possible democracy. (E-mail 30 March 2000)

                            According to NEA literature, the literature fellowships "serve the public good by nurturing the cultivation of community spirit, and fostering the recognition and appreciation of the excellence and diversity of our nation’s artistic accomplishments." (NEA 1) The literature fellowships operate on a two-year cycle. Prose fellowships are available one year; poetry fellowships are available the next. The year 2000 (March 15, 1999 deadline) is for prose; the year 2000 (March 14, 2000 deadline) is for poetry.

                            The literature fellowships are very competitive, and applicants have reasonable publication requirements. For example, in Fiction, a writer must have published at least five different stories or a collection of short fiction or a novel. In Creative Non-Fiction, five essays or a volume of creative non-fiction, is required. For Poetry, a volume of forty-eight poems or twenty pages of poetry in five or more literary anthologies, are required. For Translation, the writer must have published a translation into English of a volume of forty-eight pages or published forty-eight pages of translations in magazines or have translated a full length play that was produced.

                            The review criteria again is determined by "artistic excellence" and "artistic merit". The writer’s identity is not known to the panelists deciding the grants. Forty-one grants of twenty thousand dollars each were awarded in 2000.

                            The fellowships for Folk and Traditional Arts amount to ten thousand dollars each. Eleven awards were given in 2000. The awards went to Cambodian traditional dancers of Reston, Virginia, to a fourth generation master boat builder, the last craftsman of the unique Reelfoot Lake Stumpjumper, to an accordionist in Riveria, Texas, to Jewish Klezmer musicians in Tamarac, Florida, and to others.

                            NEA grants went to state arts councils who funneled the amounts to projects and to individuals and to many other non-profit agencies as well, such as the New York Foundation for the Arts. In 1999 the NEA announced nearly twenty million in new grants (24% of its grantmaking money). All but three million went to grants to organizations for "Creation and Presentation" projects, and was not to go to support to individuals. Eight hundred thousand went to fellowships for writers. 1.7 million was allocated for "Leadership" initiatives. Out of the NEA 1999 total budget of 98 million, 80.5 million was allotted for grants. Six hundred and thirty-nine non-profit agencies were awarded grants, out of nine hundred eight seven applying. (NEA-3)

                            Taken on a state level, for example, agencies in Alabama getting grants, besides the Alabama State Council on the Arts, included the Alabama Shakespeare Festival in Montgomery (16.5 thousand), Space One Eleven, an exhibition of artists works (22.5 thousand), State of Alabama Ballet (5 thousand) and to Natasha Treatheway (20 thousand).

                            In summary, for writers, translators, folk craftsmen and folk dancers, the NEA awards to individuals remains strong. While the NEA will remain project oriented in the near future, hopefully its awards to individuals will increase.

                            Also of interest is an NEA sponsored study "Artists in the Workplace" (Research Report #37). The study focused on four groups of artists: authors, architects and designers, performing artists and artists who work with their hands. Between 1970 and 1990 the total artist population more than doubled, from seven hundred twenty thousand to one million six hundred thousand. By 1990, painters and craft artists totaled 191,160 or thirteen per cent of all artists. Female painters/craft artists numbered 107,920 or fifty-six percent.

                            In 1989 authors’ total earnings averaged a little over twenty-three thousand dollars with "genre" or "pulp" writers making the most. Dancers had the lowest medium earnings-eighty five hundred in 1989. Personal income for actors was most volatile.

                            A number of regional art organizations (typically funded by state, national and private funds) award grants to artists. These include: Arts Midwest (Minneapolis, Minnesota); Mid-America Arts Alliance (Kansas City, Missouri); Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (Baltimore, Maryland); the Consortium for Pacific Arts and Cultures (Honolulu, Hawaii); The New England Foundation for the Arts (Boston, Massachusetts); The Southern Arts Federation (Atlanta, Georgia); The Western States Arts Federation; The New York Foundation for the Arts. Most of these grants awarded are for collaborations between artist and community,

                            however.

                            Liesel Fenner, Program Coordinator at the New England Foundation for the Arts, oversees the Visible Republic program. In a letter to me, she indicates possible support for the growing movement that requires individual artists to ally with a non-profit organization when receiving grants.

                            I coordinate the Visible Republic program which is primarily focused on serving visual and new media artists. Because the work is sited in public spaces, project implementation has proved challenging for the individual artist securing permission from institutions and agencies not familiar with public art or dealing with an individual. Artists also face fiscal tax challenges in receiving fairly large grants ($40,000) and separating artists expenses from their commission. Therefore, in the future, we might require artists to become affiliated with a non-profit organization to provide fiscal sponsorship as well as administrative assistance for implementation of work. Many similar programs around the country alreadyrequire this. The program also advocates for funding emerging artists, which can assist in launching an artist's career. Many individual artist grant programs only offer grants to established artists with years of work and exhibition experience. Artistic content, or quality of work has not been an issue for this program, in fact, we encourage more risk-taking and avant-garde projects than 'safe' public art. (E-mail 29 Mar 2000)

                            A survey of grants from these institutions reveals a diversity of opportunities in creation and performance, but not in creation alone. The Mid America Arts Alliance Project, for example, states that in its twenty-five year history, it has reached over twenty-seven million people, provided 12,334 performances, and generated $232,159,222. in direct economic activity. The Association was organized "to bring arts and audiences together" (Mid America Arts Alliance 2). Supported by federal, state and the private area, it serves Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Texas. One of its goals is to introduce ‘emerging or renowned’ performing artists or exhibitions to communities.

                            The Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation offers the ArtsConnect grant for touring companies, the ArtsEmerge grants for artists/presenter collaborations and Artist as Catalyst grant which is an artist in residence program that supports new work and community projects and dialog.

                            The New York Foundation for the Arts does offer individual artist fellowships ($7,000 each) for artists working in the state of New York. In fifteen years, NYFA has granted over two thousand artists a total of fifteen million dollars. The fellowships, partially supported by the New York State Council for the Arts, are given in sixteen disciplines, including fiction, music composition, playwriting, and video. Arts Midwest (North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio), a twenty-five year old organization, also provides grants which "connects the arts to audiences." (Arts Midwest 1)

                            The Southern Arts Confederation in Atlanta states that it "is making a positive difference by creating partnerships" (Southern Arts Confederation 1). It works in partnerships with artists from Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. It also provides development opportunities in workshops and strongly supports j*** and traveling art exhibits. Barbara Benisch of the Southern Arts Federation indicates in a letter to me some of the negative effect of the NEA cuts on individual funding. She writes: "We used to make grants to individual visual artists through a National Endowment for the Arts funding program, but that funding has been cut, as I'm sure you are aware, and we did not replace it with anything"(E-mail 31 March 2000).

                            The Western States Art Confederation "focuses its efforts on strengthening the financial, organizational, and policy infrastructure of arts in the West." (Western Art-3) The New England Foundation for the Arts "connects the people of New England with the power of art to shape our lives and improve our communities." (NEFA 1) The emphasis on arts granting among regional associations is clearly community oriented and not an area abundant with grants to individuals.

                            Creative Capital is a 501 (c) 3 tax exempt grant giving institution that began as a reaction to deep federal cuts to individual artists. It is an example of a private commitment to funding artists during a period of federal cuts. In defining the institution, Creative Capital publications state that "Creative Capital is a new, national organization designed to support artists pursuing innovative approaches to form and content in the media, performing, and visual arts, along with emerging fields" (Creative Capital Guidelines 1). The information adds that "Creative Capital is committed to working with artists in long term partnerships" (Creative Capital Guidelines 2). All of its grants go to individuals, and it is committed to "diversity in all its forms-racial, cultural, sexual, graphic, and generational." (Creative Capital Guidelines-3).

                            Founded in January, 1999, Creative Capital has raised five million from twenty-three foundations and individuals. One provision of its grants is that artists agree to share a percentage of the proceeds derived from the project. While full time students are not eligible, anyone eighteen or older and not enrolled in an educational institution, is eligible. The initial granting is to be fifty projects at five thousand dollars and ten projects at ten to twenty thousand dollars. Evaluation of the project will be based on "artistic strength" and "vision" (Creative Capitol Guidelines 3)

                            A number of other private institutions grant directly to individuals. The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation awards prestigious fellowships to creative artists who are advanced in their careers. The average grant in 1999 was $33,568. The purpose of the grant is to "help provide Fellows with blocks of time in which they can work with as much creative freedom as possible" (Guggenheim 1). The foundation annually receives three thousand to thirty five hundred applications from productive and well-established artists and scholars. It awards fellowships to two hundred.

                            The most lucrative of the private grants are the MacArthur Fellowships. MacArthur Fellows are awarded thirty thousand to seventy-five thousand dollars a year for five years. McArthur materials state that, "The fellowships are intended to support individuals, not projects" (MacArthur 1). Awardees have the freedom to continue work in the area awarded or to change areas of concentration. No individual artist can apply. There are one hundred nominators across the country who provide artists to be selected.

                            The Pew Fellowships in the Arts are another strong source of support for the individual artist. Each fellowship is for fifty thousand dollars. Awards are made only to Philadelphia artists in "performing, visual and literary categories." (Pew Fellowships 1) The goal of the grant is to "provide such support at moments in artists’ careers when a concentration on artistic growth and exploration is most likely to have the greatest impact on an artist’s long-term personal and professional development. Up to twelve fellowships will be awarded annually." (Pew Fellowships 2). The evaluation criteria is "artistic accomplishment" and "future promise." (Pew Fellowships 2).

                            Other examples of private institutional awards to artists are the residencies given by the oldest artist colony, the MacDowell in Petersboro, New Hampshire, and the DIA Center for the arts "enabling the realization of extraordinary artistic projects" (DIA History 1). Over four thousand five hundred creative artists have worked at MacDowell since it began in 1907. MacDowell offers travel awards to and from the Center and Writer Aid awards based on financial needs. The DIA awards are based on financial needs also. The DIA awards initially focused on works that did not suit large conventional museums. DIA also sponsors a Poetry Reading Series (with chapbook publication) and an artists’ web project, among others.

                            Certain private institutions such as the Gunk Foundation in Gardiner, New York, award project oriented grants to artists. The Jerome Foundation also emphasizes project oriented grants to artists living in Minnesota and New York City. It "places the emerging creative artist at the center of its grant making," and usually awards the grant to a non-profit organization (Jerome Foundation 1). Visual Aid offers grants to artists with life-threatening diseases so that they can continue with their work. The Fleishhacker Foundation in San Francisco offers grants to individual painters as well as grants for cultural education. The Creative Artists Network is a Philadelphia institution that assists artists in project/audience designed works.

                            Another institution strongly supporting individual artists is the Pollock-Krasner Foundation. Applications are accepted throughout the year from artists who have genuine financial needs. Grants are given for one year and are meant to aid artists whose work is interfered with because of financial difficulty.

                            A survey of private foundation growth sponsored by the Foundation Center in 1999 points out that the number of all grants awarded grew by 12.8%, to over 97,000 grants. There were three hundred and fifty grants of two and a half million or more given in 1998. The area of arts and culture (15% of the total) was included in those experiencing the fastest growth. Educational institutions received the largest share of all grants. (Foundation Center 3)

                            The survey that I made of the private institutions giving grants indicates an on-going commitment to giving to individuals. Creation of new foundations such as Creative Capital suggests new strength in private giving to artists.

                            Overall, the state art council awards appear to be the most available to artists, despite the trend toward project oriented awards. There appears to be an evident move toward supporting more artist grants. This can be seen in the following letter from Kathy Jones of Maine.

                            The Maine Arts Commission is very proud to continue to give individual artist fellowships after other agencies like the National Endowment for the Arts and the New England Foundation for the Arts discontinued fellowship programs. Our board has even increased the program by raising the number of $3,000 awards from 8 to 10 this year. (E-mail Mar 31 2000)

                            These numerous grants to individuals show the promise of new growth. NEA grants, more limited in category and number, are very competitive and unfortunately are offered every other year by subject. The private sector offers the most competitive grants (MacArthur, Guggenheim), but also, particularly in certain areas such as Philadelphia, has excellent opportunities. Despite exceptions, private sector support of individual artists appears focused on the established rather than the emerging artist.
                            Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored. -- Aldous Huxley
                            Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity. -- Albert Einstein

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DAL View Post
                              I don't see how any Americans, other than those who give or get the handouts, benefit from the NEA.
                              Originally posted by DAL View Post

                              18th Street Arts Complex (aka 18th Street Arts Center)
                              Santa Monica, CA
                              $30,000
                              To support artist residencies. American and international artists of various disciplines will be hosted for periods ranging from one month to one year. Artists will participate in open-studio visits and exhibitions or performances.

                              Alliance of Artists Communities (Consortium)
                              Providence, RI
                              $30,000
                              To support staff salaries and documentation of a series of residencies for young, emerging Arab authors, resulting in a publication, in partnership with La Napoule Art Foundation.

                              Alliance of Artists Communities
                              Providence, RI
                              $50,000
                              To support forums and workshops at the 20th anniversary conference of the Alliance of Artist Communities and six other sites. The programs will encourage best practices and educate people about artist communities.

                              Anderson Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, Inc.
                              Red Wing, MN
                              $10,000
                              To support residencies for visual artists and writers. Ranging from two to four weeks, residencies will provide uninterrupted time and space for artists to advance a work-in-progress or initiate new work.

                              Anderson Ranch Arts Foundation
                              Snowmass Village, CO
                              $15,000
                              To support an artist residency program. While in residence, visual and media artists will receive studio space, equipment and materials, meals, housing, travel, and exhibition opportunities. Also included is an optional structure of critical study, such as studio visits with faculty, visiting artists, and critics, and public lectures by visiting artists and critics.

                              Art Students League of New York, Inc.
                              New York, NY
                              $10,000
                              To support a residency program for professional and emerging artists and art educators. Artists will receive a room, one meal a day, a private studio, shared large studio space, access to classes and instructors, trips to Manhattan arts locations, and the opportunity for an open studios event at the end of their residency.

                              Atlantic Center for the Arts, Inc.
                              New Smyrna Beach, FL
                              $40,000
                              To support interdisciplinary residencies for emerging and mid-career artists. Master artists will collaborate with resident artists in visual arts, literature, music, and the performing arts.

                              Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts
                              Omaha, NE
                              $50,000
                              To support residencies for artists to create new work. Participating artists will receive housing, workspace, technical assistance, and a monthly stipend for two- to four-month residencies.

                              Byrd Hoffman Watermill Foundation (aka Watermill Center)
                              Brooklyn, NY
                              $20,000
                              To support artist residencies and community programs at the Watermill Center. Emerging artists and performing groups from a range of backgrounds will receive opportunities to develop new work. The project also includes education programs for area schools, open rehearsals, and artist talks available free-of-charge to the community.

                              Corporation of Yaddo (aka Yaddo)
                              Saratoga Springs, NY
                              $25,000
                              To support month-long residencies for mid-career artists at Yaddo. Artists from various disciplines will receive housing, meals, and a fully equipped studio or workspace.

                              Djerassi Resident Artists Program
                              Woodside, CA
                              $25,000
                              To support artist residencies. The project will provide studios, living accommodations, meals, and professional assistance to American visual, media, performing, and literary artists.

                              Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Inc.
                              Provincetown, MA
                              $15,000
                              To support the Winter Fellowship Program for Emerging Artists and Writers. The project will provide living accommodations, studios, and monthly stipends to 20 selected poets, fiction writers, and visual artists.

                              Friends of A Studio in the Woods (aka A Studio in the Woods (ASITW))
                              New Orleans, LA
                              $10,000
                              To support the residency program Changing Landscape: A Dialogue Between Arts and the Environment. Lodging, meals, materials expenses, transportation, stipends, and studio space in a rustic setting will be provided. Up to five literary, visual, and performing artists will present their work to the public through an on-site salon and performance presentation.

                              Hambidge Center for Creative Arts & Sciences, Inc.
                              Rabun Gap, GA
                              $10,000
                              To support the Hambidge New Artist Initiative residencies. The initiative will provide residencies to both emerging and established artists with a special focus on targeting applicants who broaden diversity.

                              Headlands Center for the Arts
                              Sausalito, CA
                              $45,000
                              To support residencies for emerging and mid-career artists. Resident artists will receive stipends, room, meals, travel expenses, and studio space in which to create new work, investigate surrounding communities, and share ideas and their works with other artists.

                              Hedgebrook Foundation
                              Langley, WA
                              $15,000
                              To support the Writers in Residence program. No-cost residencies will be targeted to women writers at the retreat located on Whidbey Island.

                              Hermitage Artist Retreat, Inc.
                              Englewood, FL
                              $10,000
                              To support artist residencies. Participants will be drawn from accomplished playwrights, composers, and creative artists from other disciplines with the lead artist receiving a substantial commissioning fee to produce a major work.

                              Kala Institute (aka Kala Art Institute)
                              Berkeley, CA
                              $40,000
                              To support artist residencies in visual arts, video, performance, digital media, and book arts. American and international artists will receive stipends, technical support, and access to working facilities.

                              MacDowell Colony, Inc.
                              Peterborough, NH
                              $40,000
                              To support residencies for artists who have not previously had residencies at the MacDowell Colony. Twelve composers, writers, media artists, visual artists, interdisciplinary artists, and architects from all regions of the United States will be invited to reside on the grounds of the MacDowell Colony and create or complete works.

                              McColl Center for Visual Art
                              Charlotte, NC
                              $30,000
                              To support residencies for visual artists. Participating artists will receive housing, workspace, technical assistance, transportation costs, a materials budget, and a monthly stipend for a three-month residency.

                              Millay Colony for the Arts, Inc.
                              Austerlitz, NY
                              $15,000
                              To support artist residencies for composers, writers, and visual artists. Six artists will receive one-month residencies between April and November, enabling 48 artists to be served.

                              Montalvo Association (aka Montalvo Arts Center)
                              Saratoga, CA
                              $30,000
                              To support the Lucas Artists Program, an artist residency program at the Montalvo Arts Center. Artists working in the performing, visual, and literary arts also will have the opportunity to present or exhibit their work at Villa Montalvo and other Bay Area venues.

                              PlatteForum (Consortium)
                              Denver, CO
                              $15,000
                              To support The Confluence Project, a shared artist-in-residence program between PlatteForum and the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver. The artists in residence will work with teens from PlatteForum's ArtLab and MCA Denver's Teen Council.

                              Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Inc.
                              Skowhegan, ME
                              $20,000
                              To support a residency program for emerging visual artists. Artists will receive a private studio, full room and board, and weekly private and group critiques by a faculty of leading professional artists.

                              Virginia Center for the Creative Arts (aka VCCA)
                              Amherst, VA
                              $10,000
                              To support international artist residencies. The project will support American artists participating in two- to six-week residencies abroad and international artists residencies in the United States.
                              yeah. I'm sure no one benefited from those, except the specific people who received funding...

                              not the coffee shops in the areas, not the hotels where attendees stayed, not the residents who attended the programs, not the people who sold arts and crafts, not the caterers who got contracts...

                              no one

                              Comment

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