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GOP sweep: Big governor victories in Virginia, NJ

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  • kc12
    replied
    Hoffman had a couple things going against him. First he didn't have the backing of the major parties. This led to not being able to spend or get his message out there as effectively as the other two people. Hoffman also wasn't from the district. I think when those two things are taken into consideration he did very well. I think if he had the backing of the Republican party he would have done much better. If he had been from the district he would have fared a lot better than he did.

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  • Southflaguy
    replied
    Originally posted by JPR View Post
    Since California does not require proof of citizenship to register to vote, they get to vote too.

    With the possible exception of defeating Barbara Boxer if the Republican party gets it's act together, I can't envision any surpises in California in 2010. Maybe I'm cynical, but I prefer to think of myself as a realist.

    This is one area that I would love to be wrong in though. What a pleasant surprise that would be.
    A lot of immigrants fresh out of another country tend to be more conservative, it's the 2nd generation (born or raised in the States) of immigrants that tend to be a little more liberal...For the most part I'm talking about Latino/Hispanic immigrants...

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  • DAL
    replied
    Originally posted by Retired96 View Post
    I predict that the demo idiots will get a serious butt whooping in the 2010 elections.
    I hope you are right. I believe that the Republicans can make gains in California as long as they focus on the economy and the business climate rather than social issues.

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  • Retired96
    replied
    I predict that the demo idiots will get a serious butt whooping in the 2010 elections.

    Leave a comment:


  • DAL
    replied
    Originally posted by dadyswat View Post
    What I find interesting is an unknown candidate from a 3rd party with little resources lost by only 3 points after having both the Dems and Repubs spend a lot of money against him and then the Repubs try to hitch a last minute ride with him when their candidate drops out and endorses the Dem.
    Hoffman got a lot of free publicity from Fox News as well as endorsements from Sarah Palin and Tim Pawlenty.

    At the same time as he lost in a heavily Republican district, Republicans retook the New York City suburbs from Democrats. So I think that the lesson is that Republicans need to be in tune with the local voters, not what the ultraconservative pundits have to say. As the saying goes, all politics is local. In New York, nearly all successful Republicans are moderates. Scozzafava was too liberal, but Hoffman was too conservative. Because Hoffman was too conservative, independents who usually vote Republican voted for the Democrat.

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  • dadyswat
    replied
    Originally posted by DAL View Post
    CNN has declared Owens, the Democrat, the winner. This means that there will be one more Democrat, and one less Republican, in the House of Representatives. This will help Pelosi. Sad as it may seem, I think Obama is a moderating force when it comes to dealing with the House.

    Owens' victory is, to some extent, a rebuff to Sarah Palin and Tim Pawlenty, as well as the FoxNews cabal.
    What I find interesting is an unknown candidate from a 3rd party with little resources lost by only 3 points after having both the Dems and Repubs spend a lot of money against him and then the Repubs try to hitch a last minute ride with him when their candidate drops out and endorses the Dem.

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  • JPR
    replied
    Originally posted by Southflaguy View Post
    Don't forget immagration DAL, that key isssue is huge in California...
    Since California does not require proof of citizenship to register to vote, they get to vote too.

    With the possible exception of defeating Barbara Boxer if the Republican party gets it's act together, I can't envision any surpises in California in 2010. Maybe I'm cynical, but I prefer to think of myself as a realist.

    This is one area that I would love to be wrong in though. What a pleasant surprise that would be.
    Last edited by JPR; 11-04-2009, 01:00 PM.

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  • E3CSHARP
    replied
    The train came hard in VA. Obviously the winners reached the people, thats just the way it goes.

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  • Till
    replied
    It was a triple ***-kicking here in VA.

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  • Southflaguy
    replied
    Originally posted by DAL View Post
    Although the issue is huge, I am not sure that the voters' positions on immigration correlate well with their party preference. For example, some black groups in Los Angeles have protested lenient treatment of illegal aliens.
    Sounds cool, but aren't most of the black voters in Los Angles for the most part Democrate voters anyway?...I don't see how all of the sudden they'll vote for a Republican; on second thought, maybe California's economy is a bigger issue...

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  • DAL
    replied
    Originally posted by Southflaguy View Post
    Don't forget immagration DAL, that key isssue is huge in California...
    Although the issue is huge, I am not sure that the voters' positions on immigration correlate well with their party preference. For example, some black groups in Los Angeles have protested lenient treatment of illegal aliens.

    Leave a comment:


  • Southflaguy
    replied
    Don't forget immagration DAL, that key isssue is huge in California...

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  • DAL
    replied
    Voters in California are turning fiscally conservative again. They will be more open to Republican candidates for state-wide office, but the Republicans' emphasis on socially conservative positions, especially abortion, drives away many voters.

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  • DAL
    replied
    Hoffman was the kind of candidate that the ultraconservative wing of the Republican Party supports, and he lost in what amounted to a head-to-head contest. I don't think he would have done any better with the Republican label. A Republican less liberal than Scozzafava but less conservative than Hoffman would have won.
    Last edited by DAL; 11-04-2009, 10:20 AM.

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  • Nightshift va
    replied
    Im posting a page of the playbook the *******s use to include current Congress and The President. This is why people are running back to the Conservative parties:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloward-Piven_Strategy

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