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  • Never would have guessed it!

    Could it be they answered their own question? More religious, less likely to get abortion/lie about pregnancy also southern states have higher rates of teen marriage adding to teen pregnancy...but they couldn't just leave it at that....


    Teen Birth Rates Higher in Highly Religious States

    livescience.com – Wed Sep 16, 7:08 pm ET
    U.S. states whose residents have more conservative religious beliefs on average tend to have higher rates of teenagers giving birth, a new study suggests.

    The relationship could be due to the fact that communities with such religious beliefs (a literal interpretation of the Bible, for instance) may frown upon contraception, researchers say. If that same culture isn't successfully discouraging teen sex, the pregnancy and birth rates rise.

    Mississippi topped the list for conservative religious beliefs and teen birth rates, according to the study results, which will be detailed in a forthcoming issue of the journal Reproductive Health. (See the full top 10 below.)

    However, the results don't say anything about cause and effect, though study researcher Joseph Strayhorn of Drexel University College of Medicine and University of Pittsburgh offers a speculation of the most probable explanation: "We conjecture that religious communities in the U.S. are more successful in discouraging the use of contraception among their teenagers than they are in discouraging sexual intercourse itself."

    The study comes with other significant caveats, too:

    The same link might not be found for other types of religious beliefs that are perhaps more liberal, researchers say. And while the study reveals information about states as a whole, it doesn't shed light on whether an individual teen who is more religious will also be more likely to have a child.

    "You can't talk about individuals, because you don't know what's producing the [teen birth] rate," said Amy Adamczyk, a sociologist at the City University of New York, who was not involved in the current study. "Are there just a couple of really precocious religious teenagers who are running around and getting pregnant and having all of these babies, but that's not the norm?"

    Strayhorn agrees and says the study aimed to look at communities (or states) as a whole.

    "It is possible that an anti-contraception attitude could be caused by religious cultures and that could exert its effect mainly on the non-religious individuals in the culture," Strayhorn told LiveScience. But, he added, "We don't know."

    Bible states

    Strayhorn compiled data from various data sets. The religiosity information came from a sample of nearly 36,000 participants who were part of the U.S. Religious Landscapes Survey by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life conducted in 2007, while the teen birth and abortion statistics came from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    For religiosity, the researchers averaged the percentage of respondents who agreed with conservative responses to eight statements, including: ''There is only one way to interpret the teachings of my religion," and ''Scripture should be taken literally, word for word."

    They found a strong correlation between statewide conservative religiousness and statewide teen birth rate even when they accounted for income and abortion rates.

    For instance, the results showed more abortions among teenagers in the less religious states, which would skew the findings since fewer teens in these states would have births. But even after accounting for the abortions, the study team still found a state's level of religiosity could predict their teen birth rate. The higher the religiosity, the higher was the teen birth rate on average.

    John Santelli of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University calls the study "well-done," adding that the results are not surprising.

    "The index of religiosity is tapping into more fundamentalist religious belief," Santelli said. "I'm sure there are parts of New England that have very low teen birth rates, which have pretty high religious participation, but they're probably less conservative, less fundamentalist type of congregations."

    Other factors that may have been important to consider include ethnic backgrounds of state residents, according to Adamczyk, the City University of New York sociologist.

    "We know that African American women on average tend to underreport their abortions, which means they could also underreport the likelihood that they got pregnant," Adamczyk said. "If you're dealing with states with a high number of African American women, you might run into that problem."

    Adamczyk's own, separate research has shown a nearly opposite correlation, at the individual level. "What we find is that more religious women are less likely to engage in riskier sex behaviors, and as a result they are less likely to have a premarital pregnancy," Adamczyk said during a telephone interview. But for those religious teens who do choose to have premarital sex, they might be more likely to ditch their religious views and have an abortion, she has found.

    Cause and effect?

    Adamczyk says the idea that anti-contraception principles could be behind the link is controversial, as studies on the topic have varied results. "The idea is that in the heat of the moment, a young woman who has said, 'I'm going to be a virgin on my wedding night,' is with her boyfriend and she says 'Let's just do it.' And since they didn't plan it, nobody has a condom. And so it increases their chances of a pregnancy," Adamczyk said.

    Earlier marriage among religious individuals could also partly explain the finding.

    "In the south, there is a higher rate of marriage of teenagers. And one possible explanation is just that in the southern states, which are also more religious, people just get married earlier and have planned pregnancies and those have perfectly good outcomes," Strayhorn said. He added that he doesn't think the earlier marriage idea explains the religion-birth link.
    A Veteran is someone who at one point in their life wrote a blank check made payable to The United States of America, for an amount up to, and including their life. That is honor, and there are way too many people in this country today, who no longer understand that fact!

  • #2
    This study is likely a result of the mass media's confusion of causation and correlation.
    "For with much wisdom comes much sorrow;
    the more knowledge, the more grief."

    Comment


    • #3
      I wonder what areas they really studied...

      Comment


      • #4
        All you have to do to verify that this is accurate is to look at that show on the learning channel 18 and counting. Someone needs to stop those people

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Flanker View Post
          This study is likely a result of the mass media's confusion of causation and correlation.
          Ditto
          sigpic

          " 'Blessed are the Peacemakers', is, I suppose, to be understood in the other world, for in this one they are frequently cursed." - Benjamin Franklin

          Comment


          • #6
            All I can say is that there were a LOT of people in my town (including myself) who grew up with the "Condoms and the pill don't work, so ABSTAIN, ABSTAIN, ABSTAIN!!!" sex-ed philosophy that was church-approved.

            I know that when I and my peers got old enough to mess around, we usually just remembered the 'Condoms and the pill don't work' part and did even dumber things because of it. I think that, for a lot of us, we figured that if they didn't work that well anyway, we may as well just go for it without such precautions.

            Way too many girls in my high school got pregnant before they should have(I'm sure pregnancy was at a higher rate than the average), and I barely dodged the bullet myself as far as STD's and fatherhood go.
            Last edited by Goose71; 09-17-2009, 10:35 PM.
            "The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly, is to fill the world with fools." - Herbert Spencer

            "Religions do make claims about the universe--the same kinds of claims that scientists make, except they're usually false."

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Flanker View Post
              This study is likely a result of the mass media's confusion of causation and correlation.
              "They found a strong correlation between statewide conservative religiousness and statewide teen birth rate even when they accounted for income and abortion rates."

              Seems like they got it right. No one suggested it's causative. Did you even read the article?
              ...hunter of the shadows is rising...

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm from a rather religious state, a rather religious family, and know and have known a lot of rather religious people.

                What I found going through the Public School System is this:

                The kids were mostly Atheist's/Agnostic's or Sunday wannabe's. There parents for the most part were religious to some degree or another.

                Secondly, most would report or say they are religious just because even though they were not.

                To the mostly religious states having higher teenage pregancies:

                Look at what I primarily witnessed during my High School years. Many people say they are religious but are in fact not. Parents may be religious but kids are not. A lot of those kids only went to Church for social networking and were not interested in the teachings.


                SOOOO my unscientific correlational explanation is that the Atheists/Agnostic's/Sunday wannabe's are more likely to get pregnant in a more Religious state because the Religious parents are less likely to get there kids birth control/condoms or talk about sex and just stress Abstain which only works on the more religious kids for the most part.

                For the most part I do not necessarily disagree with there findings. I disagree with the slanted approach of the article to the question at hand and would call into question there methods and would want to look them over for a political anti-religious agenda. They might have been doing a self-fulfilling prophecy research which is easy to do.


                Off-topic some what - There seems to be a continuum spread of Religious Observation and Followance taking place. Look back thousands of years ago (mundane simple example): (Earlier Stages) Polytheism -> (Middle Stages)Monotheism -> (Current Stages) Secularism. As can been seen in recent years there has been a full out onslaught against everything religious. Look at the Florida case, I believe I heard the Federal Judge just ruled the Principal and Athletic Coach in contempt for saying prayer over the food only among adults. The Republican Rep or Senator said it just nicely over the ruling: (Paraphrased) It is the first time in American History that praying has been criminalized. The ACLU response: Republicans are politically grandstanding. Uhhhh who is politically grandstanding?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by SteveOKC View Post
                  I'm from a rather religious state, a rather religious family, and know and have known a lot of rather religious people.

                  What I found going through the Public School System is this:

                  The kids were mostly Atheist's/Agnostic's or Sunday wannabe's. There parents for the most part were religious to some degree or another.

                  Secondly, most would report or say they are religious just because even though they were not.

                  To the mostly religious states having higher teenage pregancies:

                  Look at what I primarily witnessed during my High School years. Many people say they are religious but are in fact not. Parents may be religious but kids are not. A lot of those kids only went to Church for social networking and were not interested in the teachings.


                  SOOOO my unscientific correlational explanation is that the Atheists/Agnostic's/Sunday wannabe's are more likely to get pregnant in a more Religious state because the Religious parents are less likely to get there kids birth control/condoms or talk about sex and just stress Abstain which only works on the more religious kids for the most part.



                  For the most part I do not necessarily disagree with there findings. I disagree with the slanted approach of the article to the question at hand and would call into question there methods and would want to look them over for a political anti-religious agenda. They might have been doing a self-fulfilling prophecy research which is easy to do.
                  You're focusing on the kids. I recommend focusing on the adults who go to PTA, who participate in local and state government...the adult politicians. Those adults and their religiosity is what carries more weight in this analysis...imho.

                  Originally posted by SteveOKC View Post
                  Off-topic some what - There seems to be a continuum spread of Religious Observation and Followance taking place. Look back thousands of years ago (mundane simple example): (Earlier Stages) Polytheism -> (Middle Stages)Monotheism -> (Current Stages) Secularism. As can been seen in recent years there has been a full out onslaught against everything religious. Look at the Florida case, I believe I heard the Federal Judge just ruled the Principal and Athletic Coach in contempt for saying prayer over the food only among adults. The Republican Rep or Senator said it just nicely over the ruling: (Paraphrased) It is the first time in American History that praying has been criminalized. The ACLU response: Republicans are politically grandstanding. Uhhhh who is politically grandstanding?
                  Learn the facts of this case. The facts of this case are available.
                  ...hunter of the shadows is rising...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I wonder how much they spent on that study. And who paid for it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Goose71 View Post
                      All I can say is that there were a LOT of people in my town (including myself) who grew up with the "Condoms and the pill don't work, so ABSTAIN, ABSTAIN, ABSTAIN!!!" sex-ed philosophy that was church-approved.


                      Way too many girls in my high school got pregnant .
                      Know what you're saying, in my hometown the catholic HS always had more pregnant girls. I asked why, and the answer was use of a condom was preached as a sin. I asked isn't premarital sex also a sin and if so, you're committing one, might as well do a two fer

                      This study was not about "pregnancy rates" but "birth rates". To me this article is showing the kids are listening because the "religious" girls have a lower abortion rate.

                      Overall I think the article is written pretty fairly, the study me thinks not....there are other studies showing 180 degree opposite of these findings.
                      A Veteran is someone who at one point in their life wrote a blank check made payable to The United States of America, for an amount up to, and including their life. That is honor, and there are way too many people in this country today, who no longer understand that fact!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ray8285 View Post
                        Overall I think the article is written pretty fairly, the study me thinks not....there are other studies showing 180 degree opposite of these findings.
                        Link...source...anything to back this up?
                        ...hunter of the shadows is rising...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Interestingly enough, the study is now being called into question by other scientific groups. Not so much because of the findings, but because of the lack of data to support the claims made by the study.

                          Here's one such article.

                          Thus far, none of the articles touting the "findings" of this study are able to link to the actual data because it hasn't been released for review yet. The facts quoted by the author thus far simply do not support the broad sweeping claims being put forward.

                          I think I smell a rat with an agenda....
                          \

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The "Peer Review" process might shed some light on the quality of this study and it's conclusions. I hope it gets reviewed in that manner.
                            ...hunter of the shadows is rising...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Has anyone mentioned that some religions encourage procreation and marriage at an early age?
                              Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored. -- Aldous Huxley
                              Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity. -- Albert Einstein

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