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The OJ Verdict- 10 Years Later- where were you?

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  • #76
    Jimmy127: Thanks for supporting me. How can one be awarded millions and STILL choose a life of crime??

    Like That Guy said, "Criminals thrive on the indulgence of society's understanding." Henry Ducard, no statement is closer to the truth!!

    I did some quick research and this is what I found:

    "In the years since he uttered his famous plea -- "Can we all get along?" in an effort to help bring an end to the riots -- King has seldom spoken in public, even though he has repeatedly found himself in the spotlight.

    At the time of the beating, King was a one-time Dodgers Stadium usher who had been convicted of robbery and was on probation.

    His life since has been marked by run-ins with the law and squabbles with attorneys over the $3.8 million settlement in his lawsuit against the city of Los Angeles.

    Two months after the beating, King was arrested on suspicion of trying to run down an officer after police in Hollywood allegedly saw him pick up a transvestite prostitute. No charges were filed.

    He has been pulled over by police and convicted of drunken driving. He was convicted of hit-and-run driving for an incident involving his wife and later pleaded guilty to spousal abuse in a separate incident. He is on probation until 2003.

    Professionally, King flirted with a music career and started a rap label but quickly abandoned it. He earned his high school equivalency degree, went to work for his brother's construction company and practiced his surfing.

    "Rodney never chose to be an icon," said Renford Reese, a political science professor at California State Polytechnic University at Pomona who has counseled King and invited him to address his classes. "He got beat one night, and all of a sudden he becomes a symbol for racial reconciliation and police reform. But he was never trained to be a change agent."

    Opportunities lost to fight racism
    King, now 35, declined to be interviewed for this story.


    The acquittal of four officers involved in King's beating sparked riots and outrage

    Renee L. Campbell, one of his attorneys, said the memory of what happened on March 3, 1991, still sparks flashbacks and is too painful to revisit.

    "Rodney is an ordinary guy, he has the same kind of typical problems that everyone has, normal family problems, what have you," Campbell said. "To his misfortune, because of his celebrity, whatever happens to him, be it an argument or a shouting match, it can get escalated and turned into something completely different than what it was."

    Over the years, King handed out gift certificates on Martin Luther King Day and explored plans for a book and a youth foundation. He lives in Pasadena, spending time with his three daughters. King lost about half his settlement money in disputes over legal bills.

    Those who hoped he would emerge as a civil rights figure or a force behind police reform have been disappointed.

    "I've thought about what an opportunity lost," said Grimes, who was King's attorney from 1992 to 1994 and sued him over legal bills."

    This is from an article dated March 3, 2001 on CNN.com LAW CENTER.

    To say that King is an ordinary guy with typical problems? No, he is a crack head, a drug dealer and a criminal. Whether he's black or purple he is a CRIMINAL. And deserves to be treated as such!!

    It should be a universal law, in my opinion, that as soon as you break a law ALL of your rights are forfeited. PERIOD!!!!

    Criminals have to start taking responsibility for their actions!

    Comment


    • #77
      RIALTO, California (AP) -- Rodney King, whose videotaped beating led to the deadly 1992 riots in Los Angeles, was hospitalized with a broken pelvis after he lost control of his sport utility vehicle while weaving through traffic at 100 mph and crashed into a house, police said.

      Wednesday, April 16, 2003 Posted: 4:03 AM EDT

      http://www.cnn.com/2003/US/West/04/15/rodney.king.ap/

      Comment


      • #78
        Originally posted by Jimmy127
        RIALTO, California (AP) -- Rodney King, whose videotaped beating led to the deadly 1992 riots in Los Angeles, was hospitalized with a broken pelvis after he lost control of his sport utility vehicle while weaving through traffic at 100 mph and crashed into a house, police said.

        Wednesday, April 16, 2003 Posted: 4:03 AM EDT

        http://www.cnn.com/2003/US/West/04/15/rodney.king.ap/

        Rumor has it that his SUV and the house he hit will be indicted by the Feds for violating his civil rights. He'll also file a lawsuit against his pelvis for breaking.
        Disclaimer: The writer does not represent any organization, employer, entity or other individual. The first amendment protected views/commentary/opinions/satire expressed are those only of the writer. In the case of a sarcastic, facetious, nonsensical, stirring-the-pot, controversial or devil's advocate-type post, the views expressed may not even reflect those of the writer.

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        • #79
          Recently, on a local radio show, one of the host's said that they felt OJ would admit his guilt, sometime, somewhere..... does anyone agree with this?

          Because of the whole double jeopardy thing he can't be tried twice for the same charge. Is that even true? And what in the face of an admittance of guilt?

          Comment


          • #80
            I was standing outside OJ's courthouse on duty, when the verdicts were announced. None of us were really surprised.

            We were deployed around the city in case a guilty verdict came down but we weren't really expecting one.

            Comment


            • #81
              I was asleep.....I was on graveyards at the time.
              You cant arrest me...I know my Commandments!!

              Comment


              • #82
                I worked the division next-door to the division which contained the court house. I had "borrowed" a hand-held radio and took it home so I could monitor the frequency on my way into work, because I had an afternoon shift on the day of the verdict. Despite the circus atmosphere, no problems.

                Being a member of the vast right-wing conspiracy, I listen to my staticky-old AM transistor radio while I'm on patrol. A couple of L.A. talk-show hosts (KFI's John & Ken) told their audience to turn on their headlights during the day to show opposition to the verdict. At that moment I was southbound on Beaudry at 3rd Street, turned mine on and saw some civilian guy in the northbound lane do so at the same instant. We looked at each other and nodded in agreement.

                I can't wait to leave L.A. next year....for good! O.J.'s verdict was the first gallon of gas in the car that will drive me away from here.
                "You're never fully dressed without a smile."

                Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

                Three things I know for sure: (1) No bad deed goes unrewarded, (2) No good deed goes unpunished, and (3) It is entirely possible to push the most devoted, loyal and caring person beyond the point where they no longer give a 5h!t.

                Comment


                • #83
                  OJ and Mad Michael Jackson should start their own lodge. Money might not buy you love (and I have yet to be convinced of that), but it sure will buy you a bent judicial system which winks in your favour....

                  Such big cheeses are not exonerated or incarcerated due to the colour of their skin. Black people who think this are profoundly mistaken. It's a matter of money. Poor people, be they white, black or sky-blue pink, will not get the quality defence lawyers available to rich people.

                  Now, it might be that there are proportionately more wealthy white people than black people, but that's another topic. The key is wealth, not skin colour.
                  Last edited by banastretarlton; 10-10-2006, 06:57 AM.

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                  • #84
                    Remember

                    Originally posted by BrickCop
                    Hhhmmm...no replies. I guess nobody else heard the OJ verdict back then.

                    I remember I was stationed at Edwards AFB back then. He proved one thing, If you got enough money or fame you can get away with MURDER. Piece of dog S**T should have fried
                    In pursuit of the criminal element

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      On a traffic stop

                      I was a police officer in suburban Detroit when the Simpson verdict came out. Was on a traffic stop and was waiting for the announcement on the AM radio. After waiting for the verdict I released the driver, then waited some more. Finally the verdict was read and I was in absolute disbelief . It was then I believed in "the best Justice money can buy".

                      Now did anyone remember the news story when a buried knife was found by construction workers on his former Brentwood estate?
                      Last edited by opmed4n6; 10-15-2006, 07:56 PM.

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                      • #86
                        Originally posted by HeineyGirl
                        Because of the whole double jeopardy thing he can't be tried twice for the same charge. Is that even true? And what in the face of an admittance of guilt?
                        He could confess to the murder right now on national TV. And there's nothing anything could do about it. He can never be put away for the murder.

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          There's plenty that someone could do about it. It's just whether that person would be forensically aware and just plain lucky enough to get away with it.

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Originally posted by banastretarlton
                            There's plenty that someone could do about it. It's just whether that person would be forensically aware and just plain lucky enough to get away with it.
                            hell yes! You are right!! But he doesn't need to admit for that to happen! we already know he did it.

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Originally posted by opmed4n6
                              Now did anyone remember the news story when a buried knife was found by construction workers on his former Brentwood estate?
                              Wasn't that knife found across the street? I was in the headquarters building when detectives started rushing out to get that knife. It was a non-event, as they could produce closed-circuit video of OJ doing the deed, today, and he couldn't be tried again.

                              As big a doofus as he sometimes was, when the not guilty verdict came in, (LAPD ex-chief) Willie Williams said, "We won't be looking for anyone else, we got the right suspect, the jury set him free."
                              "You're never fully dressed without a smile."

                              Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

                              Three things I know for sure: (1) No bad deed goes unrewarded, (2) No good deed goes unpunished, and (3) It is entirely possible to push the most devoted, loyal and caring person beyond the point where they no longer give a 5h!t.

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Originally posted by AMG
                                I will not lie, when I heard the verdict the first thing that came to my mind is a black man was finally a beneficiary of the crooked system that whites been getting around for centuries.
                                This passage alone just adds more credability to what pro-writer had said. I'm glad you cheered for a murderer just because whitey had been keeping black people down so long. Yet you can't understand how the verdict changed white people forever.
                                Last edited by Ex Army MP; 10-21-2006, 11:01 AM.


                                "Jerry, just remember, it’s not a lie if you believe it". George Constanza.

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