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The OJ Verdict- 10 Years Later- where were you?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Jellybean400
    I remember i was sitting in my apartment, with my then-b/f.

    I was in a state of shock, as was he. Disgusted.

    I remember the scenes of the blacks rejoicing, yelling, clapping, smiling...almost as shocking as the verdict. And his smiling was the worst of all...

    And the Justice system...disgusting also...

    I'm sure it wasnt ALL blacks, but what i saw that day definitely changed me, unfortunately.
    Changed you how? Did you lose faith in the justice system, or do you think twice about inviting a black person to your home?

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by IloveAmerica
      Ok, so now we've jumped from most blacks to many blacks? At least you're back pedalling in the right direction. That was your impression? We're ok then, your previous posts implied it was a fact, now you've made it clear that it was just your warped interpretation.
      No "jump" or "backpedaling" intended and there's nothing "warped" about the honest belief that MOST black Americans that I have personally encountered or overheard supported OJ's supposed "innocence."

      Originally posted by IloveAmerica
      What am I accusing everybody of doing? In regards to your polls, are they the same polls that predicted Kerry would win the election? Polls are useless. They polled about 100 to 300 blacks and concluded every black person rejoiced over OJ's conviction.
      You are accusing people here of harboring prejudicial racial beliefs, such as that "all blacks" are athletic, and/or thugs, and/or listen to rap music. That is reducing the issue to RACISM, which was precisely what you objected to in your original post, in the case of the verdict itself. There's a huge difference between the honest first-hand impression that VERY MANY black Americans seemed pleased with his acquittal and the a-priori generalization, based purely on race, that "all blacks" are or are not, by nature, anything, such as "athletic" OR predisposed to supporting the wrongful acquittal of anybody who happens to be black. As I already tried to express (repeatedly), I was not, by any means EXPECTING to hear so much support for OJ in the black community after the trial, and I was genuinely shocked by (my honest perception) that SO many blacks seemed to support OJ Simpson after the trial.

      I may be wrong in my perception, but if so, it's definitely not because of any racist assumptions or expectations and I resent your implication that it is, despite my explicit explanation of my degree of surprise and disappointment with what I perceived to be true.

      Originally posted by IloveAmerica
      Changed you how? Did you lose faith in the justice system, or do you think twice about inviting a black person to your home?
      How does it affect me? No, not by changing my willingness to invite anybody black into my home but in my belief that blacks are, by virtue of having EXPERIENCED blind racism, somewhat LESS likely to harbor racist sentiments and allegiances than white people. If I saw two people drowning, one white and one black, their respective skin color would not influence my decision as to whom to rescue, or whom to rescue first. Since the OJ verdict, I no longer believe that's the case with MANY-and-very-possibly-MOST black Americans.
      No longer ignoring anybody here, since that psycho known as "Josey Wales" finally got the boot after being outed as a LE imposter by B&G978. Nice job.

      Comment


      • #33
        I was in 6th grade.
        "In these modern times, many men are wounded for not having weapons or knowledge of their use."
        -Achille Marozzo, 1536

        Ne Obliviscaris - Do Not Forget

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        • #34
          2nd grade?
          6th grade?

          You guys are killin me!

          I was in grade 12. I recall the guys at the high school shouting 'The Juice is loose!'.

          Goes to show that with money, you CAN get away with murder...

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Soon2Be
            2nd grade?
            6th grade?

            You guys are killin me!

            I was in grade 12. I recall the guys at the high school shouting 'The Juice is loose!'.

            Goes to show that with money, you CAN get away with murder...
            Spare me, you're not even 30 yet.
            Hail hail the gang's all here, when the going gets tough I know my friends will still be there. - Drop Kick Murphys, "The Gang's all Here"

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Soon2Be
              2nd grade?
              6th grade?

              You guys are killin me!

              I was in grade 12. I recall the guys at the high school shouting 'The Juice is loose!'.

              Goes to show that with money, you CAN get away with murder...
              Combined with a poor prosecution

              Anyways...I was sitting in front of the television at my grandmother's house. She worked in the courts and was always watching it and, since I was around her all of the time, it rubbed off a tad.

              I remember that was THE trial that proved to me that our nation had an imperfect justice system. Grew up a bit that day.
              -I don't feel you honor someone by creating a physical gesture (the salute). You honor them by holding them in memory and, in law enforcement, proceeding in vigilant, ethical police work. You honor this country or deceased soldiers or whatever you're honoring when you salute a flag by thinking, feeling, and continuing a life of freedom.

              --ArkansasRed24

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              • #37
                Originally posted by djack16
                Combined with a poor prosecution

                ...combined with the black equivalent of the cliche "all white Southern jury in the 'ol days".
                Disclaimer: The writer does not represent any organization, employer, entity or other individual. The first amendment protected views/commentary/opinions/satire expressed are those only of the writer. In the case of a sarcastic, facetious, nonsensical, stirring-the-pot, controversial or devil's advocate-type post, the views expressed may not even reflect those of the writer.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by BrickCop
                  ...combined with the black equivalent of the cliche "all white Southern jury in the 'ol days".

                  That I blamed on the prosecutors. I'm not a law major, but doesn't the prosecution take part in jury selection? If yes, why would you pick any juror that may be sympathetic to the defense?

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by IloveAmerica
                    That I blamed on the prosecutors. I'm not a law major, but doesn't the prosecution take part in jury selection? If yes, why would you pick any juror that may be sympathetic to the defense?
                    Because:
                    1. Generally, you only get a couple of peremptory challenges; the rest have to be for cause; and
                    2. Prospective jurors often lie, especially if they want to be part of a nationally televised circus involving a "celebrity".
                    No longer ignoring anybody here, since that psycho known as "Josey Wales" finally got the boot after being outed as a LE imposter by B&G978. Nice job.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by IloveAmerica
                      That I blamed on the prosecutors. I'm not a law major, but doesn't the prosecution take part in jury selection? If yes, why would you pick any juror that may be sympathetic to the defense?

                      I agree with you here. In fact the DA actually moved this case to a jurisdiction that had considerably higher percentage of minorities. I guess the DA was naive enough to believe that no jury anywhere would ignore the overwhelming mountain of evidence.
                      Disclaimer: The writer does not represent any organization, employer, entity or other individual. The first amendment protected views/commentary/opinions/satire expressed are those only of the writer. In the case of a sarcastic, facetious, nonsensical, stirring-the-pot, controversial or devil's advocate-type post, the views expressed may not even reflect those of the writer.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        I was walking a beat downtown. A local newscrew had a live feed and t.v. set up in whats called Market Square. Used to be a nice historical place, now its a homeless and crackhead hangout. So when the verdict was read the black people cheered and Whooped it up, the working people and white people just kinda looked dumbfounded. Homeless, losers and the local detritus all cheered and high fived each other as if one of their own was found not guilty.
                        I got nothing for now

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by BrickCop
                          ...combined with the black equivalent of the cliche "all white Southern jury in the 'ol days".
                          For what its worth crime in the SOUTH cause of those all white Southern jury's kept the crime levels down,compared to what we deal with today,rampant crime at all levels Everywhere especially in the South!

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            I was, like much of America, watching TV. My girlfriend had taped all the TV coverage of the trial and much of the associated commentary, especially that of Greta Van Susteren, who was extremely incisive and prescient.

                            In my opinion, the verdict was definitely the correct one, even if Mr. Simpson in fact committed the crimes as alleged in the indictment.

                            The reason for that is that the prosecution utterly failed to prove his guilt, while the defense amply proved that the prosecution had committed perjury and had attempted to frame Mr. Simpson. That is not to say that a guilty person can't be framed; however, the prosecution should not be allowed to get a conviction by framing someone, even if the peron is guilty as charged.

                            I don't think Mr. Simpson acted like an innocent person; I don't think an innocent person would have led the police on a slow speed chase while holding a gun to his head.

                            Even so, here's why I would have had to vote as the jury did if I'd been on the jury:

                            1: Detective Fuhrman stated that he had found one bloody glove at the crime scene, had driven with it to Mr. Simpson's house at Rockingham, and had hopped over the fence there, and found the mate to the first glove lying in the driveway. That is prima facie very unlikely. It is not likely that Mr. Simpson would while having had the foresight to wear gloves also try to help get himself caught by leaving one glove at the crime scene and the other in his driveway, while still having the presence of mind to dispose successfully and entirely of his other incriminating clothing. It's much more believable that Detective Fuhrman planted the gloves, unless we believe that he would not do any lying, and that Mr. Simpson alternates between smart and stupid.

                            2: Mr. Bailey's tape of Detective Fuhrman repeatedly uttering a disparaging racial epithet that he had on the stand to Mr. Bailey repeatedly denied having ever uttered established not only that Detective Fuhrman could reasonably be regarded as racist, but more importantly, that he was a perjurer, with no compunction about lying under oath. If we wish to give the personal character of Detective Fuhrman the benefit of reasonable doubt, we may suppose that he would not lie to inculpate a person he believed was innocent, regardless of race; however, that he lied to help inculpate Mr. Simpson is clearly beyond doubt.

                            3: Detectives Fung and VanAtter admitted that they had walked about the crime scene while in possession of a vial containing blood drawn from Mr. Simpson after his arrest and prior to the logging of the blood evidence from that crime scene. In my opinion, the police should not have been allowed to collect blood from Mr. Simpson prior to the logging of all blood evidence from the crime scene, and no-one should have been allowed to take it anywhere but the lab and court after it was collected. There were several centiliters of blood missing from the vial, and all the blood evidence collected that was later DNA-identified as from Mr. Simson amounted to considerably less than the missing volume.

                            4: Mr. Scheck, via highly credible expert witnesses, established that there was an EDTA content in all the Simpson-identified blood that was in the range of 1000 times higher than could be accounted for by Mr. Simpson having ingested food containing EDTA, and that such a high EDTA level was entirely consistent with that which one would expect from the preservative content in the purple cap of the blood vial used to hold the blood sample taken from Mr. Simpson. These facts made it clear to the jury that all the blood evidence alleged by the prosecution to have been found at the crime scene and on the glove allegedly found in Mr Simpson's driveway had come from the sample taken from Mr. Simpson.

                            5: The gloves in question not only were obviously too small for Mr. Simpson's hands; they were also quite typical of police duty gloves, and were about the right size to fit Detective Fuhrman.

                            Thus, the defense proved definitively that the prosecution had fabricated all of the most damning of its so-called "mountain of evidence" it had presented against Mr. Simpson, so that acquittal was the only conscientious verdict at which the jury could arrive.

                            I think there is a widespread belief among black Americans that police and prosecutors routinely bend or break the rules in order to convict especially them, and that the obviousness of the cheating that the prosecution had perpetrated in Mr. Simpson's case served to reinforce that belief.

                            I think the not guilty verdict in the instance of Mr. Simpson, a black defendant, albeit one with extraordinary defense capability at his disposal, served to show persons of that belief that prosecutorial cheating does not always work.

                            I think that, and not insensitivity to the horrors of the double homicide, or delight at "one of their own" getting away with murder, is mainly what engendered the outburst of elation at the verdict among black Americans.

                            Regards,

                            Monty

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                            • #44
                              I was standing in front of the tv sticking pins into my Johnny Cochran voodoo doll. I guess it took ten years, but it must have worked. No doubt that POS is serving fece sandwiches in hell right now to Hitler and whoever founded the ACLU.

                              Oh, and Bartender, I'll have whatever Monty's drinking.
                              Last edited by Wisconsin Migra; 12-03-2005, 01:16 AM.

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                              • #45
                                I'm sure I was on the ocean somewhere making big boxes with the aircraft carrier.
                                "Respect for religion must be reestablished. Public debt should be reduced. The arrogance of public officials must be curtailed. Assistance to foreign lands must be stopped or we shall bankrupt ourselves. The people should be forced to work and not depend on government for subsistence." - Cicero, 60 B.C.

                                For California police academy notes go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CABasicPolice/

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