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The OJ Verdict- 10 Years Later- where were you?

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  • The OJ Verdict- 10 Years Later- where were you?

    Frontline recently aired a one sided documentary about the whole OJ fiasco.

    Where were you when the verdict was read?

    I was at work with mostly black civilian workers as they had a TV in their office. All along I thought they pretty much believed he was guilty but sure as **** they started jumping up and down with glee. I was shocked- these were not homey the gang banger types.

    I remember being taunted as I got into my cruiser by numerous black people honking their horns who acted as if they had won the Lottery. That day was a real eye opener for me.
    Disclaimer: The writer does not represent any organization, employer, entity or other individual. The first amendment protected views/commentary/opinions/satire expressed are those only of the writer. In the case of a sarcastic, facetious, nonsensical, stirring-the-pot, controversial or devil's advocate-type post, the views expressed may not even reflect those of the writer.

  • #2
    Hhhmmm...no replies. I guess nobody else heard the OJ verdict back then.
    Disclaimer: The writer does not represent any organization, employer, entity or other individual. The first amendment protected views/commentary/opinions/satire expressed are those only of the writer. In the case of a sarcastic, facetious, nonsensical, stirring-the-pot, controversial or devil's advocate-type post, the views expressed may not even reflect those of the writer.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by BrickCop
      Hhhmmm...no replies. I guess nobody else heard the OJ verdict back then.
      I did. I have just tried to forget it. The verdict and the event going on in my own life.

      I was recovering from knee surgery # 2 and was in poor mood anyway!

      I was in a trauma unit during portions of th actual trial and the nurses used to make me watch TV and that was th eimportant story of all news casts.

      My mom says I was easily annoyed and disliked being propped up and strapped to the chair to keep my body up. I never responded to anything on tv and they were concerned about that. Mom says that one day, as I was watching tv and complaining that I hurt, trial highlights were on. She says I lifted my hand to my face, turned it away from the Tv and told the nurse, "Change it, I am so sick of this. He is guilty." It was that moment that my mom and the nurses knew I was going to be ok.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BrickCop
        Hhhmmm...no replies. I guess nobody else heard the OJ verdict back then.
        With that Dream Team Cast of Lawyers I knew he would beat the Wrap,But we all knew HE Did It and got away with it.Too much has happened since that time,to dwell on that.The Jury's rule so we are left to deal with there judgements that's the part that Stinks!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BrickCop
          ...That day was a real eye opener for me.
          Ditto. This is something I wrote a year or two after the verdict.

          The aftermath of the O.J. Simpson verdict also affected me very
          deeply. Prior to that time, I was under the impression that relatively few
          black people were themselves racially prejudiced. It had always just seemed
          to me that anyone experiencing prejudice from the receiving end would
          naturally be less inclined to the same conduct himself.

          Since I tend to keep to myself as much as possible at the gym, I make little
          eye-contact and rarely have conversations beyond merely "Hello" for politeness' sake. Fairly soon after developing this habit though, it presented a dilemma: From what I've observed myself, as well as from conversations with black acquaintances, I know that at least fifty percent of all white people harbor at least some degree of prejudice against blacks. It doesn't particularly bother me that some people at the gym probably think I must be something of an A-hole for barely acknowledging anybody else when I'm there. On the other hand, it is an absolutely excruciating thought for me that anyone--especially someone black--could think that racial animus underlies my apparent unfriendliness. Given the general incidence of white prejudice and my almost Aryan looks, that wouldn't necessarily be an unrealistic assumption.

          One of the reasons I first decided to avoid simple pleasant exchanges in the
          first place is that they inevitably lead to more involved conversations which,
          for reasons discussed in the section of this book dealing with integrity, I
          specifically try to avoid. Consequently, I found myself developing friendly
          acquaintances with black gym members, almost exclusively, while still pretty
          much ignoring everyone else.

          All that ended rather abruptly after the O.J. Simpson trial, after which I
          didn't worry anymore about anybody's misconstruing the roots of my apparent unfriendliness in the gym, since the vast majority (75% according to most polls) of blacks sided with Simpson for no other reason than racial identity. For years I'd imagined that the average black person knew firsthand how wrong racism was, so that really burst my bubble.

          By far, the most offensive suggestions I heard put forth in the aftermath of
          the O.J. trial is that it's impossible for blacks (or other minorities) to be
          racist since they possess insufficient political or economic power to effect
          any changes. By that definition, someone could actively hate white people
          while claiming not to be racist, merely for lack of political power. By that
          philosophy, hating white people wouldn't be considered racist unless or until
          black political power equaled that of whites. Of course by the same token,
          once black power surpassed that of whites, it would no longer be racist to
          hate blacks anymore, by virtue of the logic underlying the basic premise.

          Making a conscious effort to spend your money at black-owned businesses
          is just as racist as discriminating against them. Contrary to popular opinion,
          it is impossible to "respect" or "value" your own racial heritage without
          having less respect, or devaluing other races and culture to the same degree.
          By definition, you are racist precisely to whatever extent you make judgments
          or decisions about other human beings based on what race they are. You
          need not "hate" or actively discriminate against anyone to be a racist--it is
          enough that in your mind you merely sympathize with your own race, even
          if you never happen to come into contact with anyone of another race.

          Anyone who is genuinely non-racist is appalled by ANY expression of racial
          identification or preference, not just by OTHERS' practicing it. I personally
          have absolutely no greater interest in or concern over Jewish affairs or
          issues than over issues affecting any other human beings. I am equally
          disgusted to see Jews giving preferential consideration to other Jews as to
          African Americans or Asians to members of their respective cultures.

          Whatever my degree of concern over or sensitivity toward human issues, it
          is dictated purely by objective principles like fairness, equity, empathy, and
          compassion, and not one iota with any regard to whether someone happens
          to share my skin color, race, culture of origin, nationality or citizenship.

          But I digress. Where was I? Driving home on the NYS Thruway S/B from Stilettos in Nanuet the night before
          Last edited by ProWriter; 10-07-2005, 03:00 PM.
          No longer ignoring anybody here, since that psycho known as "Josey Wales" finally got the boot after being outed as a LE imposter by B&G978. Nice job.

          Comment


          • #6
            Working at my old job in the city and running my arse off all that night from disturbance to disturbance in a few select neighborhoods, couple of mini riot's quite a few arrests.
            Trooperden, akman75, & azmichelle ignored

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            • #7
              Don't ask why or how, but I actually remember the day. I was in second grade and it was raining here so we couldn't go outside for recess. So instead we played with linkin logs and stuff. Anyways, a little ways into recess one of the supervisors walks in and asks us if we want to know the verdict. Heck, it was obvious to me he was guilty and I was eight!

              I remember watching the chase one evening after I got home from seeing a movie, too.

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              • #8
                2nd grade...ok, now I feel prehistoric, thank you very much.

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                • #9
                  Styx if it makes you feel any better, I was in 6th.
                  Hail hail the gang's all here, when the going gets tough I know my friends will still be there. - Drop Kick Murphys, "The Gang's all Here"

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                  • #10
                    Watching the Great State of California get another one WRONG.

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                    • #11
                      I was in 6th grade english class, they actually made an announcement over the intercom that the verdict was going to be read. After it was read we heard kids outside our classroom cheering... my teacher rolled her eyes and turned the tv off right away.

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                      • #12
                        I don't remember where I was...or what I was doing.

                        But I do distinctly remember being very happy that I would have to put up with no more OJ ANYTHING on TV or the radio.

                        In my honest opinion...I think that very verdict was the beginning of modern racism.
                        An impressionable child in a tumultuous world, and they say I'm at a difficult stage... --Meat Loaf

                        Professional Stupidity Recognition Technician

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                        • #13
                          BrickCop, I used to like and respect you, HOWEVER, since your topic here has made me feel old as hell, I am reconsidering.....

                          Good Lord! I was working, non LEO, and just remembered thinking, I guess money really can buy anything you want......
                          When I'll be the girl that you love, you'll be the boy that I hate...

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Welpe
                            Styx if it makes you feel any better, I was in 6th.
                            Oh, yeah...rub it in.

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                            • #15
                              Quote:
                              Originally Posted by Welpe
                              I belong to the Whig party.


                              mmmmmm, 6th grade.........

                              so that's where it all began........



                              www.schackdaddy.com
                              " if you talk in your sleep, don't mention my name....
                              " if you walk in your sleep, forget where you came....

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