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  • supplements for stiff joints?

    I was wondering what everyone takes for stiff joints? Early in the morning or after a work out sometimes I get stiff joints. thoughts?

  • #2
    I have been taking "Move Free" brand of Glucosimine (sp?) and Chondroition (again sp?) I honestly can't tell you if it is doing anything yet, but I have a pretty stiff workout schedule....and I am a border-line old fart, so I could just be screwed!

    But I understand that you have to take this stuff for a few weeks before any effect might be seen...at least thats what my Dr. at Kaiser informed me.

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    • #3
      Simply put if you can afford it...HGH. Unless you are young then disregard.
      Budda sat in front of a wall and when he stood up he was enlightened. I sat in front of a wall and when I stood up the wall was enlightened.


      We forge our skills in the fire of our will.

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      • #4
        The glucosamine chondroitin formulae sold for oral ingestion are mostly destroyed in the digestive tract after ingestion. Unfortunately, while the two substances are necessary precursors to cartilage formation, taking them orally does not allow more than very little of the supplements to reach the joints intact.

        The following discusses the possible use of a substance, which, while legal to possess, is not FDA approved for human use, and has properties which make it dangerous:

        DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) is a substance produced commercially as a byproduct of the paper industry. It is produced and used by plants and facilitates intercellular molecular locomotion. It is a very potent solvent.

        It is FDA approved for veterinary purposes only.

        It is readily accepted into the body through the skin. Because of its potency as a solvent, and its somatic penetrative ability, it can be mixed with other substances, and will carry them them into the body.

        That means if you mix it with something poisonous and then touch it, the poison will poison you.

        If you put it in your hand, you'll taste it a few seconds later.

        Some bad guy hippies would mix it with LSD in the late 60s and early 70s and would run through the park with a windex bottle filled with the mixture and would spray people with it to force other people to experience an acid trip. They called it LACE, in mimicry of the mace word. Some black-ops guys used to mix it with cyanide and put it on a door handle. The target would open the door, walk inside, and drop dead.

        Because of its ability to violate cellular walls, it can cause otherwise isolated conditions to become systemic.

        Some persons, especially those allergic to sulfur-containing substances, are violently allergic to DMSO. There was a reported case of a fatality attributed to repeated administration of DMSO to a person who displayed symptoms of allergy that were deep into anaphylaxis.

        OK, so now that some of the dangers have been gone over a little, here are some of the benefits:

        It's used to increase absorption in horse liniment. I've seen it for sale (99% pure -- it works better diluted to 80% with sterile distilled water) at the tack shop.

        It can carry beneficial substances such as glucosamine and chondroitin into the joints.

        It is itself a very effective antiarthritic, because of its pro-circulatory and lubricatory effects and because of some of its other effects, which would require some molecular biology explanation to explain -- I'll say here that it's a fairly simple polar molecule, and will explain more about how it works if anyone asks.

        It is the most potent diuretic known. If a few grams are injected into a person, for example in case of cranial edema, it can cause several pints of water to be dumped in a few minutes. (Please don't do this, call 911 instead, unless you know as much emergency medicine as a physician or paramedic or EMT, and much more completely about this than I'm reporting here, and please remember in any event that it's not an approved treatment for human beings.)

        I don't want to report having witnessed the use of it on human beings, but I do think it's very effective, especially in the trauma phase for injuries, all by itself. I've read studies, that involved experimentation on animals, that have shown that. I've never seen it used in conjunction with another substance, and have seen assiduous avoidance of allowing another substance to be carried with it into a body. I've seen it work wonders.

        Anyway, you can find many references to it on the net.

        Please be careful.

        Regards,

        Monty

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        • #5
          Is ibuprofen a supplement?
          Those who are successful at what they do don't give a rip about what others think about them.

          We don't rent pigs.

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          • #6
            Ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), not a supplement. (Sorry, I didn't notice the smiley when I wrote that.)

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            • #7
              I remember seeing DMSO all over the place MANY years ago...I thought it kinda went the way of the Dodo bird....

              Guess not!

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              • #8
                Look into Carlson's fish oil. 2-4 tablespoons a day has nice effects on joints as well as other benefits.
                Moooooooooooo, I'm a goat

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                • #9
                  You know...my wife tells me to take fish-oil, and its sitting there in the cabinet next to al the other suppliments, but I am hesitant to take it for some reason. Does it really help?

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                  • #10
                    Some oils derived from cold-water fish, such as North Atlantic anchovies, mackerel, and sardines, are rich in omega-3 fatty acids -- EPA (elcosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahenanoic acid). I don't want to go into too much lipoprotein analysis in this post, but I'll say Moms were right when they handed out cod liver oil. I'll elaborate more on the biochemical physiology of lipoproteins if anyone is interested.

                    I don't blame anyone for not wanting to take fish oil supplements, because there's literally something fishy about them, but they're definitely very good for most persons. They're helpful for many kinds of body repair.

                    They can make some persons feel fatigued because of their bodies starting to do some repairs that they facilitate, but after awhile the invigorating effects of the successful repairs kicks in. I suggest giving the fish oil a try.

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                    • #11
                      If you take encapsulated fish oil, make sure that there are at least 10iu's of Vitamin E as it helps stabilize the fish oil and keep it from becoming rancid.

                      I love Carlson's, you can get the large bottle from vitaminshoppe.com for cheap, it is not fishy, has a very light lemon flavor and not only is it beneficial for joints, but has a nice cardiovascular effect as well.
                      Moooooooooooo, I'm a goat

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JSD73 View Post
                        If you take encapsulated fish oil, make sure that there are at least 10iu's of Vitamin E as it helps stabilize the fish oil and keep it from becoming rancid.

                        I love Carlson's, you can get the large bottle from vitaminshoppe.com for cheap, it is not fishy, has a very light lemon flavor and not only is it beneficial for joints, but has a nice cardiovascular effect as well.
                        I don't know Carlson's, but after reading what you've posted about it, I'm going to research it.

                        Vitamin E, tocopherol, while it does have an anti-oxidant effect, that can help to prevent rancidity in fish oil it's mixed with, can if taken in excess cause functional exhaustion of motoneurones. But rancid fish liver oil, which alpha-tocopherol antagonizes, can cause abnormal function of motoneurones. Either can consequently cause bad effects on respiration and other motor function. Vitamin E can itself go rancid if it's in its ester, oil, form as distinguished from dry powder.

                        Keep the fish oil in the fridge, and watch the expiration dates, and don't take too much vitamin E.

                        The tocopherol mediated peroxidation effects of an excessive ratio of alpha-tocopherol to gamma-tocopherol, which excessive ingestion of vitamin E supplements is apt to produce, can be mitigated by use of coenzyme Q-10, and the antioxidant effects of vitamin E are facilitated by use of vitamin C.

                        Please be careful with supplements. Don't overdo them. But many of them can be very beneficial, if used carefully, harmoniously, and judiciously.

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                        • #13
                          While this thread has gone on the direction of fish oil...

                          Has anyone tried the Coromega brand of fish oil? It's an emulsified fish oil that claims an orange flavor with no fishy aftertaste in a single-serving foil packet. I've considered picking up a box to try, and wanted to see if anyone had an opinions on it. The label is below:

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                          • #14
                            Looks like a good formulation to me.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by shadow_otw View Post
                              I have been taking "Move Free" brand of Glucosimine (sp?) and Chondroition (again sp?) I honestly can't tell you if it is doing anything yet, but I have a pretty stiff workout schedule....and I am a border-line old fart, so I could just be screwed!

                              But I understand that you have to take this stuff for a few weeks before any effect might be seen...at least thats what my Dr. at Kaiser informed me.
                              +1 on Glucosamine and Chondrointin. Combined, they're the new "mericle drug" for joints.

                              Comment

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