Ad JS

Collapse

Leaderboard

Collapse

Leaderboard Tablet

Collapse

Leaderboard Mobile

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sleep and can you be accommodated

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Sleep and can you be accommodated

    I have been on for 23 years, been doing shift work the whole time. I love my days off during the week and do not want to give this up for straight days. My Sgt has been kind enough to allow me to do an early start on nights 1500 to 0300. This works great, I get 7 hours of sleep and feel good after doing 3 nights in a row. Unfortunately due to some shortages I have had to do some 1800 starts. A fellow member suggested getting a doctor's note to ensure I always start at 1500. I have seen my doctor for sleep issues and she has prescribed Ativan and Immovain. These mess with the 1500 are great.
    I am nervous about doing this because it can cause other issues within your shift. Currently a high ranking member is not having interviews with all accommodated members, reviewing doctors notes and if not acceptable you see the force doctor. If they do not feel it is legitimate the accommodation is denied.

    has anyone else had these issues? How did you deal with it?

  • #2
    Doesn't your contract say something about working hours set by your employer? What if everyone wanted to only work those hours? Your sleep meds will work just fine on a different schedule.

    You come off to all that you are set in your ways and don't want to adjust PER THE NEEDS OF YOUR AGENCY.
    Now go home and get your shine box!

    Comment


    • #3
      Warning Will Robinson, Danger, Danger !

      Do some research before you pursue this as (depending on the circumstances) you could be talking yourself our of a job.

      The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires employers to provide reasonable accommodation to qualified employees with disabilities. There are three key elements here, qualified employees, disability, and reasonable accommodation.

      Because you have a manager screening reasonable accommodation requests, I'm going to assume you are a qualified employee. Good so far.

      The next issue is, do you have a genuine disability requiring a change in your shift hours, or is this merely a personal preference to meet your life style? If you doctor will attest that you have a verifiable disability requiring a shift adjustment, you can move onto the next step.

      The last issue deals with whether your request is reasonable or unduly burdensome for the employer. Does the employer genuinely need you during the adjusted hours you want, or are you a needless extra body from 1500 to 1800 and are you creating a short staffing situation from 0300 to 0600 when you are allowed to leave early? If it is the latter, your request is unduly burdensome and does not have to be granted under ADA.

      As a side note, you mentioned you are taking ativan and Immovain as prescribed by a physician for your sleep issues. In requesting a change in shift change hours, no doubt you intend to introduce this information in support of the seriousness of your condition and the need for reasonable accommodation. Here's where you may find yourself in trouble.

      As a minimum requirement of the job, most law enforcement agencies require that an officer be available to report for duty in an emergency, at any hour of the day or night, 24 hours a day. These are medications that cause you to sleep, thus making you unavailable to report for duty in an emergency.

      In addition, most agencies have policies prohibiting an officer from reporting for duty while under the influence of any drug or medication (prescribed or not) that could impair their ability to perform the duties of their position. Ativan warns users to avoid operating machinery. Immovain specifically warns against operating a vehicle or machinery within 12 hours of taking that medication. In addition, the side effects of Ativan and Immovain include confusion, aggression, hallucinations, vision changes, agitation, extreme anxiety, irritability, and memory impairment just to name a few. No manager in his right mind is going to let an armed cop remain on duty who just told him he is taking meds that can cause these side effects.

      FWIW, 20 years ago one of my sergeants came to me with a story similar to yours. In his case, it was clear there was no legitimate medical issue and he simply wanted a shift modification to meet his personal life style. Giving him the shift he wanted was going to eliminate supervision during house when it was needed and have a sergeant work when a supervisor's presence was not required.

      I denied his request and the next thing I knew I had both the job steward and the union rep in my office. They lambasted me for denying the request, and listied off medical condition after medical condition this poor sergeant was suffering from, along with what task it prevented him from performing. I listened patiently, writing down every injury and ailment they said he was suffering from and every job duty they said it kept him from performing. When they were done, they then demanded that he be granted his reasonable accommodation request.

      First I told them I was unaware that the sergeant was that sick and asked them to confirm they were authorized to speak on his behalf and that he specifically authorized them to release his medical information to me. They assured me they were. I then pointed out that as his authorized union representatives, they have just informed me that the Sergeant is so ill they he is medically unable to perform the duties of his position and I must now terminate him. Needless to say, after a brief conference the job steward and the union rep decided the sergeant was miraculously healed. (Must have called in a faith healer.)

      My whole point here is, your initial statements suggests this may be more of a lifestyle issue than a medical one. If so, this is not a battle you want to take on.

      But, let's assume I am wrong and this is a legitimate medical problem. Based on your statement this appears to be a non-work related medical issue for which you are taking prescribed medication that has the potential to impair your ability by perform the duties of your job. When a department deems an officer as being unable to perform the duties of their position due to a non-work related illness or injury, that standard practice is to allow him to first burn off his sick leave, then his remaining leave credits, then go to family leave. If the condition is not healed to the satisfaction of the department physician by that point, the officer is usually terminated for medical reasons. Unless you are already at retirement age, this means no pension, no nada, just unemployed. Consider this carefully before you make your next move.

      .


      Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by L-1 View Post
        , they have just informed me that the Sergeant is so ill they he is medically unable to perform the duties of his position and I must now terminate him. Needless to say, after a brief conference the job steward and the union rep decided the sergeant was miraculously healed. (Must have called in a faith healer

        When i was a steward, I was in a similar meeting where the Colonel (I talked about him earlier and how he trusted my judgement ) took me off to the side and told me to think carefully about what I was asking for...........because he was pretty sure I would not like the consequences if my request was granted.

        We suspended the meeting and I went into talk to him privately. He had some information that I (imagine that) hadn't been told by my greivant .I took that information back to the employee and asked him about it& he confirmed.

        We dropped the grievance very quickly and quietly
        Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS


        (F*** Off Cuz Ur Stupid)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Iowa #1603 View Post
          When i was a steward, I was in a similar meeting where the Colonel (I talked about him earlier and how he trusted my judgement ) took me off to the side and told me to think carefully about what I was asking for...........because he was pretty sure I would not like the consequences if my request was granted.

          We suspended the meeting and I went into talk to him privately. He had some information that I (imagine that) hadn't been told by my greivant .I took that information back to the employee and asked him about it& he confirmed.

          We dropped the grievance very quickly and quietly
          Unfortunately, i was dealing with a job steward who couldn't just come in and talk about a problem. Instead, he delighted in declaring nuclear war over every minor issue. In addition, the sergeant he was representing had publicly stated he didn't believe he should be held accountable for performing supervisory duties and instead, should be allowed to hold his rank simply to honor him for his many years of service.

          Needless to say, gentlemen's rules of conduct had gone out the window on this one.

          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by L-1 View Post
            The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) ....
            hn1234 is a Canadian so he's working under a different set of rules. Otherwise, this is the sound advice we have come to expect from you.

            I would add that Ativan and Immovain are recommended for only short-term use. If someone has been using them for more that a couple weeks, they should seek a second opinion, preferably from a sleep specialist.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Seventy2002 View Post
              hn1234 is a Canadian so he's working under a different set of rules.
              I missed that. Thanks.


              Originally posted by Seventy2002 View Post
              Otherwise, this is the sound advice we have come to expect from you.
              Chairborne Ranger School




              Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

              Comment


              • #8
                Would have been nice if the OP posted being Canadian. We wouldn't have wasted time answering him.
                Now go home and get your shine box!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
                  Would have been nice if the OP posted being Canadian. We wouldn't have wasted time answering him.
                  Except for the ADA information, everything else I said applies.

                  If this is a lifestyle issue, he's going to become "one of those guys" in the eyes of his department and treated as such. OTOH, if he walks into a supervisor's office and announces he has a non-work related medical condition that makes him unfit for duty, he can count on being placed on leave and medically separated if it isn't remedied.
                  Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    True...maybe for Canada also. I don't know what the Napoleanic Code states.
                    Now go home and get your shine box!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I wonder if I tell my bosses, that I can't sleep during the day when I hear my wife yellin' at my kids, if I can get my schedule changed.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm just confused by the whole issue of 3 hours here. I mean I would understand if the issue was night shift versus days or evenings or a rotating shift schedule (pretty sure there is a legit shift workers diagnosis) but 3 hours? Kinda sounds like a lifestyle choice to me.

                        Comment


                        • scotty_appleton814
                          scotty_appleton814 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          One of those diagnosis is called circadian sleep disorders and there is a shift worker subset.

                      MR300x250 Tablet

                      Collapse

                      What's Going On

                      Collapse

                      There are currently 12432 users online. 468 members and 11964 guests.

                      Most users ever online was 19,482 at 11:44 AM on 09-29-2011.

                      Welcome Ad

                      Collapse
                      Working...
                      X