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  • Strength Training for LEOs

    Hello everyone,
    I am writing a strength training program that is specifically designed for the law enforcement community. The higher ups in my department have their own idea what a program for their police officers should look like and I don't believe it is specifically designed to what we may actually have to do in a given day. I believe the program we have now is more designed to improve our PT test scores.

    The six basic movements LEOs do in the course of our duties are 1. Squating 2. Lunging 3. Pushing (full body ) 4. Pulling (full body) 5. Twisting (full body) and 6. Bending (similar to a deadlift). Maybe I should add grip strength in here but it seemed more specific.

    You can add a drag element to several of these movements alone or in combination. For example : pulling someone out of a vehicle would require pulling, twisting, bending, and a drag element.

    I am looking for any additional duties you folks can think of that you might do during the course of a given day. I figure if I break the basic movements down, I can design a program around that. I tried to poll my own department but I am not authorizes to send out mass-emails to the entire department. Besides, management thinks our PT test prep guidance is just swell. Go figure....

    Any help I can get would be greatly appreciated

    Thanks!!

  • #2
    I would add, being able to get over a wall or fence that is taller than you. Many agencies use a six foot test, but depending on height it is a completely different challenge.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by stryker505
      Hello everyone,
      I am writing a strength training program that is specifically designed for the law enforcement community. The higher ups in my department have their own idea what a program for their police officers should look like and I don't believe it is specifically designed to what we may actually have to do in a given day. I believe the program we have now is more designed to improve our PT test scores.

      The six basic movements LEOs do in the course of our duties are 1. Squating 2. Lunging 3. Pushing (full body ) 4. Pulling (full body) 5. Twisting (full body) and 6. Bending (similar to a deadlift). Maybe I should add grip strength in here but it seemed more specific.

      You can add a drag element to several of these movements alone or in combination. For example : pulling someone out of a vehicle would require pulling, twisting, bending, and a drag element.

      I am looking for any additional duties you folks can think of that you might do during the course of a given day. I figure if I break the basic movements down, I can design a program around that. I tried to poll my own department but I am not authorizes to send out mass-emails to the entire department. Besides, management thinks our PT test prep guidance is just swell. Go figure....

      Any help I can get would be greatly appreciated

      Thanks!!
      I don't know why you want to make a program that focuses exercises on functions. In my opinion, a weight training program would focus on legs, back, chest, arms and abs.
      Not to personally criticize your ideas, but splitting squatting and lunging is pointless. Doing proper free-weight squats would give a person good quads, hamstrings, glutes, and lower back strength. Doing free-weight lunges can only be done up to a certain weight because it's not a 'one-rep max' kind of exercise.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by stryker505
        Hello everyone,
        I am writing a strength training program that is specifically designed for the law enforcement community. The higher ups in my department have their own idea what a program for their police officers should look like and I don't believe it is specifically designed to what we may actually have to do in a given day. I believe the program we have now is more designed to improve our PT test scores.

        The six basic movements LEOs do in the course of our duties are 1. Squating 2. Lunging 3. Pushing (full body ) 4. Pulling (full body) 5. Twisting (full body) and 6. Bending (similar to a deadlift). Maybe I should add grip strength in here but it seemed more specific.

        You can add a drag element to several of these movements alone or in combination. For example : pulling someone out of a vehicle would require pulling, twisting, bending, and a drag element.

        I am looking for any additional duties you folks can think of that you might do during the course of a given day. I figure if I break the basic movements down, I can design a program around that. I tried to poll my own department but I am not authorizes to send out mass-emails to the entire department. Besides, management thinks our PT test prep guidance is just swell. Go figure....

        Any help I can get would be greatly appreciated

        Thanks!!

        I think an overall exercise program would be more benefical then trying to figure out what exercises are job specific. An increase in overall personal fitness would be a better goal. Suggesting exercises like squats to people that have never squated or have lower back and knee pain will not go over to well. Suggesting leg presses, and leg extensions would be a better choose for those individuals. Also, I would imagine that their are officer on your department that are in really good shape and have their own ideas on how to work out. Remember What works for you may not work for the next guy. So a workout plan with many options is called for.

        However, the only way a fitness program will work is to have a sound nutrition plan. If planning a diet for a person was easy the united states wouldn't be the fattest country in the world. In my honest opinion I think consulting a nuritionist would be a wise course of action. Getting suggested diet plans for each weight group would be more benifical then suggesting 4 set of bench press.

        Consulting Fitness experts is a key for your fitness program to work. Just coming up with stuff from reading muscle and fitness, Men health, Runners world, and Flex is not going to cut it. I would search out the advice of a strength and conditioning coach at a local college, and get his/her advice. That would validate your program with their name on it. Now if their is certain coaches for certain sports I would talk to the Track, Football, wrestling strength and conditioning coaches. Why is that. I would want suggested Sprinting workouts, Overall strength workouts, stretching plans and plyometric exercise to help stimulate fast twitch muscle fibers. Everything officers does boils down to anearobic bursts of energy. Sprinting, trying to gain control of a suspect. This Is all anearobic bursts that need to be trained for. That's why running 3-6 miles at a time in the academy is stupid. When will you need to do that? NEVER. Running 100 yard sprints would condition you body to perform at the highest levels better then that 3 mile run. You train for body to perform the necassary tasks needed. You don't see football teams run 8 miles at a practice. They run alot of sprints. Why is that. That's what they need to do in the game. Run as fast as they can for 10-20 sec. With burst of strength, and be able to do it again the next play.

        I would consult fitness experts and have them get on board with your plan. Then I could see your department doing a blanket change. Also, another suggestion is to see if those strength and conditioning coaches would be available for one to one fitness consults with each officers to help that officer develop his own plan to get into better shape.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by livestrong6
          Everything officers does boils down to anaerobic bursts of energy. Sprinting, trying to gain control of a suspect. This Is all anaerobic bursts that need to be trained for. That's why running 3-6 miles at a time in the academy is stupid. When will you need to do that? NEVER. Running 100 yard sprints would condition you body to perform at the highest levels better then that 3 mile run. You train for body to perform the necessary tasks needed. You don't see football teams run 8 miles at a practice. They run a lot of sprints. Why is that. That's what they need to do in the game. Run as fast as they can for 10-20 sec. With burst of strength, and be able to do it again the next play.
          This exactly what I was getting at. The program we need has to be job specific based on functional strength. Unfortunately our PT test (Push ups, pull ups, sit ups, run) isn't going to change. How many push ups I can do in a minute has nothing to do with my job. None of these events activates the posterior chain, emphasizes the core (twisting), or test your balance. So, a program designed to help you increase your PT numbers is the dumbest **** ever.

          Developing a good anaerobic base is key. Long distance running doesn't help you when you are fighting with a suspect. If that was the case, every marathon runner would be competing in the UFC.

          If you are a cop- Livestrong- you know what I mean.

          Thanks for the input. You are reinforcing my stance on this.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by blustar
            I would add, being able to get over a wall or fence that is taller than you. Many agencies use a six foot test, but depending on height it is a completely different challenge.
            Thats a good one. There are a lot of SWAT teams that include that in their training and in their quarterly PT test.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tripledouble
              I don't know why you want to make a program that focuses exercises on functions. In my opinion, a weight training program would focus on legs, back, chest, arms and abs.
              Not to personally criticize your ideas, but splitting squatting and lunging is pointless. Doing proper free-weight squats would give a person good quads, hamstrings, glutes, and lower back strength. Doing free-weight lunges can only be done up to a certain weight because it's not a 'one-rep max' kind of exercise.
              I am not looking for a GPP (General Physical Preparedness) type of program. We have enough of that. The program I am writing is a supplemental one. It's for guys who are already in shape but want to prepare themselves for the specifics of the job.
              The major failing in many weight training programs in they work body parts rather than movements. These programs are great for a bodybuilder who wants to look strong. We have to BE strong. Dead lifts, Kettlebell swings, cleans, snatches, high pulls,... These exercises train movements.

              Thanks for the input.

              Comment


              • #8
                You may want to check out the book "New Rules of Lifting". It outlines some of the same principles that you describe (Squat, Lunge, Press, Pull, etc.).

                Here's a link to the book on Amazon.

                New Rules of Lifting

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks Derek,
                  I will check it out.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I hear kettel bells are amazingly effective. Apparently the russian police/military has used them for training for years.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by stryker505
                      Hello everyone,
                      I am writing a strength training program that is specifically designed for the law enforcement community. The higher ups in my department have their own idea what a program for their police officers should look like and I don't believe it is specifically designed to what we may actually have to do in a given day. I believe the program we have now is more designed to improve our PT test scores.

                      The six basic movements LEOs do in the course of our duties are 1. Squating 2. Lunging 3. Pushing (full body ) 4. Pulling (full body) 5. Twisting (full body) and 6. Bending (similar to a deadlift). Maybe I should add grip strength in here but it seemed more specific.

                      You can add a drag element to several of these movements alone or in combination. For example : pulling someone out of a vehicle would require pulling, twisting, bending, and a drag element.

                      I am looking for any additional duties you folks can think of that you might do during the course of a given day. I figure if I break the basic movements down, I can design a program around that. I tried to poll my own department but I am not authorizes to send out mass-emails to the entire department. Besides, management thinks our PT test prep guidance is just swell. Go figure....

                      Any help I can get would be greatly appreciated

                      Thanks!!
                      I would be interested in a copy of whatever you put together, it sound's like a good idea. The fact of the matter is; it doesn't matter if you are built like a freakin' body-builder, most of those muscles are built for show, not regular useage on a daily basis, I see more "Muscled up" guys get hurt than I do guys who are in good overall condition. Meaning to me, good flexibilty, good cardiovascular endurance, strong back and core, etc... I have always heard that a good calisthenics program will get you in better shape than any weight lifting program ever will. The only thing that lifting weights will give you is overall brute strength and the intimidation factor. But from what I've seen it's not always the best route for all people.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You got it nrneuha. It's going to be a long time in the making. I did get a tentative OK to purchase some kettlebells. I will donate a sandbag or two.

                        The first draft will have to be a little watered down due to concern of injuries. Once everyone sees that the likelihood of getting injured lifting odd objects (sandbags, kettlebell, ect.) is no more than traditional weightlifting, I can get the ball rolling.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'd also be interested in seeing your plan when it's completed.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Keep it simple and efficient, something that works but doesn't take a huge amount of time or equipment. I suggest a program built around 1 primary exercise, my choice being the clean and press. This exercise works the whole body and is versatile, you can use barbells, dumbells, kettle bells, whatever you like. Moderate weight for several sets of 10-15 reps a few times a week and supplement it with some cardio and you'll have something fast and (relatively) easy that will get results.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              www.dieselcrew.com

                              www.elitefts.com

                              Please, everyone, do yourself a favor and research some of the stuff here. There is so much to say about some of the posts here. Leg presses and leg ext. instead of squats and/or deads...what! The best way to train for multiple qualities that LEO's need is conjugate training. If you do not know what that is then start there and work up. I think you'll find it's just what your looking for. LEO should train like athletes. Not runners, not powerlifter and not bodybuilders. One of the best new models out there would be a MMA fighter. Strength and stamina to use in the real world.
                              "Let him who desires peace prepare for war"
                              Qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum - Flavius Vegetius Renatus

                              "Therefore, I do not run like a man running aimlessly; I do not fight like a man beating the air. No, I beat my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize."
                              1 Corinthians 9:26-27

                              Comment

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