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Just purchased some Protien powder.

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Batman21
    Just remember 1 for 1.

    You should be taking in 1 gram of protein for 1 pound of body weight (as a general rule) so just evaluate your diet and if you are below your target goal and dont think that you can eat that many chicken breast's then go ahead use it and get what you need from it.

    I use it and recommend it. Go to the newstands get a Mens health, or any variety of it and read it. There is a lot of reading to be done on the subject but simply put your muscles need it to grow and Whey protien has a much higher BV (biological value) than anything you can eat not to mention that after you workout you need to have protien in your system for optimal growth etc.......

    Like I said lots of reading and if you are only going light you dont need it but if you are really trying to get stronger/bigger it is a must.
    I'm curious what you are basing your recommedation of 1 gram per pound of body weight. These articles you are talking about, are they paid advertisements or scientific studies?
    Cowboys in town. Trouble expected.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by PTI
      I'm curious what you are basing your recommedation of 1 gram per pound of body weight. These articles you are talking about, are they paid advertisements or scientific studies?
      I am sorry I ment Kg of body weight here

      I will find some more later but I have to leave work right now.

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      • #18
        Like everything else in life, Protein is good if used in moderation. A shake on the run or when you don

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        • #19
          don't take the entire shake in one go before the work out... take it during the day... 2 shakes a day should be enough...

          before your workout, (30 minutes before) take a large coffee... get pumped (coffee is also a fat burner) and go workout... drink water during work out... then once done, keep sipping on your shake and you'll be fine..

          also if you are taking creatine, then take half a table spoon 30 minutes before workout, and half a table spoon after workout...

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          • #20
            USING PROTEIN AND AMINO ACIDS TO BUILD MUSCLES AND FUEL ACTIVITY
            Athletes use protein to build and maintain muscle and other lean tissue structures and, to a small extent, to fuel activity. The body handles protein differently during activity than during rest.

            PROTEIN FOR BUILDING MUSCLE TISSUE
            In the hours of rest that follow physical activity, muscles speed up their rate of protein synthesis - they build more of the proteins they need to perform the activity. And whenever the body rebuilds a part of itself, it must tear down the old structures to make way for the new ones. Physical activity, with just a slight overload, calls into action both the protein-dismantling and the protein-synthesizing equipment of individual muscle cells that work together to remodel muscles.

            Dietary protein provides the needed amino acids for synthesis of new muscle proteins. However, the true director of synthesis of muscle protein is physical activity itself. Repeated activity signals the muscle cells' genetic material to begin producing more of the proteins needed to perform the work at hand.

            The genetic protein-making equipment inside the nuclei of muscle cells seems to "know" when proteins are needed. Furthermore, it knows which proteins are needed to support each type of physical activity. For example, a weight lifter's workout send the information that muscle fibers need added bulk for strength and more enzymes for making and using glycogen. A jogger's workouts stimulates production of proteins needed for aerobic oxidation of fat and glucose. Muscle cells are exquisitely responsive to the need for proteins, and they build them conservatively only as needed.

            Finally, after muscle cells have made all the decisions about which protein to build and when, a weight lifter migh add to existing muscle mass between 1/4 ouce and 1 ounce (between 7 and 28 grams) of protein each day. This extra protein comes from ordinary food.

            PROTEIN FOR FUEL
            Not only do athletes retain more protein, they also use a little more protein as fuel. Studies of nitrogen balance show that the body speeds up its use of amino acids for energy during activity, just as it speeds up its use of glucose and fatty acids. Protein contributes about 10% of the total fuel used, both during activity and during rest.

            DIET AFFECTS PROTEIN USE DURING ACTIVITY
            The factors that regulate how much protein is used during activity seem to be the same ones that regulate the use of glucose and fat. One factor is diet - a carbohydrate-rich diet spares protein from being used as fuel. Some amino acids can be converted into glucose when needed. Others, the banched-chain amino acids, can stand in for glucose in energy pathways. If your diet is low in carbohydrate, much more protein will be used in place of glucose.

            INTENSITY AND DURATION AFFECT PROTEIN USE
            The intensity and duration of activity also affect protein use. Endurance athletes who train for over an hour a day, engaging in aerobic activity of moderate intensity and long duration, may deplete their glycogen stores by the end of their training, and become more dependant on body protein for energy. The protein needs of bodybuilders and weight lifters are higher than those of sedentary people, but not as high as the protein intakes many bodybuilders consume.

            DEGREE OF TRAINING AFFECTS PROTEIN USE
            Finally, the degree of training also affects the use of protein. The better trained a person is, the less protein used during activity at a given intensity.

            HOW MUCH PROTEIN SHOULD AN ATHLETE CONSUME?
            Although most athletes need somewhat more protein than do sedentary people, average protein intakes in the United States are high enough to cover those needs. Therefore, athletes in training should attend to protein needs, but should back up the protein with ample carbohydrate. Otherwise, they will burn off as fuel the very protein they wish to retain in muscle.

            A joint position paper from the American Dietetic Association (ADA) and the Dieticians of Canada (DC) recommends protein intake somewhat higher than the 0.8 gram of protein per kilogram of body weight recommended for sedentary people.

            Current recommendations are:

            RDA For Adults (0.8 g/kg/day)
            Recommended For Power (strength or speed) Athletes (1.6-1.7 g/kg/day)
            Recommended for Endurance Athletes (1.2-1.6g/kg/day)

            Athletes who eat a balanced, high-carbohydrate diet that provides enough total energy, also consume enough protein - they do not need special foods, shakes or supplements.

            Source:
            Nutrition Concepts and Controversies 9th Edition
            Frances Sizer M.S., R.D. F.A.D.A and Eleanor Whitney PH.D.
            Copyright 2003
            Published: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning, 10 Davis Drive, Belmont CA 94002-3098

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