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  • Getting your "second wind"

    I have some running questions for all the experienced runners out there....how do you know when you are getting your second wind?

    Can you describe it?? I.e. my heart rate increases for x number of minutes or seconds, my breathing gets heavy for x number of minutes or seconds, this part of my body starts hurting the mosts or burning.

    Also, when you are approaching the point where you get your second wind what do you do to distract your mind or what do you do that helps you push through and keep running instead of slowing to a jog or walk?

    Last question, promise How many miles did you start off running in the academy and how many miles were you running when you graduated?

    Thanks in advance for all the advice,

    TRPR2B
    Be a leader, not a follower

  • #2
    Originally posted by trpr2b
    I have some running questions for all the experienced runners out there....how do you know when you are getting your second wind?

    Can you describe it?? I.e. my heart rate increases for x number of minutes or seconds, my breathing gets heavy for x number of minutes or seconds, this part of my body starts hurting the mosts or burning.
    It isn't something physical per se, it is more of a mental/conditioning thing. Simply changing your breathing pattern (1 breath in every 2 steps, 1 breath out every two steps is what I usually do) can give you a "second wind." A second wind is mainly in the middle of your run when you feel like $%#@ and something "clicks" and you are able to pick it up again.. sometimes for just a couple minutes, sometimes the rest of run. It is almost entirely mental for me.. I can sometimes achieve a "second wind" when I am doing a HARD workout simply by "getting mad" at my body... not accepting that it is tired, and just up-ing my adrenaline. You have to have the conditioning in place first in order to pull upon it and acheive the second wind.

    Originally posted by trpr2b
    Also, when you are approaching the point where you get your second wind what do you do to distract your mind or what do you do that helps you push through and keep running instead of slowing to a jog or walk?
    See above.. but sometimes it is okay to stop and jog/walk.. your body is trying to tell you it needs to rest. Do I suggest giving in every time you feel tired - no. But if this is a common problem, an adjustment in workout pace might be needed, so you can run fluidly and efficiently throughout the entire run, non-stop.

    Originally posted by trpr2b
    Last question, promise How many miles did you start off running in the academy and how many miles were you running when you graduated?
    I'll have to defer - not at that point yet!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by trpr2b
      I have some running questions for all the experienced runners out there....how do you know when you are getting your second wind?

      Can you describe it?? I.e. my heart rate increases for x number of minutes or seconds, my breathing gets heavy for x number of minutes or seconds, this part of my body starts hurting the mosts or burning.

      Also, when you are approaching the point where you get your second wind what do you do to distract your mind or what do you do that helps you push through and keep running instead of slowing to a jog or walk?

      TRPR2B
      How do you know when you're hitting your second wind? The short answer is "when you stop feeling like ****".

      It takes your body quite a while to go from its' normal resting state to a high-intensity-exercise state (the fitter you are the less time it takes; the more efficient you are at the particular activity also the less time it takes). But it takes time none-the-less to gradually bring your body systems up (body temp, HR, BP, lubrication of joints, nerve endings etc. etc. etc.).

      If you push it too hard and too fast your body struggles to catch up - HR is all over the map, legs muscles work hard to smooth out, body temp goes up too fast, breathing rate is erratic etc.). And while that stuff is happening you don't feel so good while you're running - everything feels choppy and uneven and like it's way too much work. And like you can't get into a "groove".

      If you take your time with the warmup, start off slowly, and gradually (very gradually if you're new) increase the pace until you reach a pace that you feel like you can maintain over the long haul, eventually everything starts to smooth out and you feel like you can run forever.

      The important thing during long slow distance runs is to just start off slowly, and find a pace where you are comfortable (and where your HR stays constant). If your HR is too high you'll find that you're working at a pace that you just can't maintain over the long haul.

      Listen to what your body is telling you - if you pay attention you will begin to find that you can take your pulse at different times during the run and it will be almost the same time and time again. I can tell now exactly what my HR is - without fail if I'm in the zone and feel great it's 144, and I don't even bother taking it anymore. I start to feel like crap and sure enough my HR is too high.

      It's not quite that simple though. There's a lot of things tied into how you feel during any given run - what your diet has been like, what the weather conditions are, how much sleep you got, how stressed out you are, how hydrated you are, how much rest you've had between runs, how fast you try to push it early in the run etc.

      But generally, if you're in good health, eat well, rest well, start off slowly, don't increase your overall mileage too fast and learn to pay attention to the cues that your body is giving you, you'll improve and find the effort easier to deal with.

      Some runs are just easier than others though, even when all the variables seem to be in your corner. If you hit a tough spot during the run slow down a bit (and be OK with that), don't let your head "get in the way" (it's easy to get psyched out when things head south), pick up the pace again gradually and try to get back into a smooth groove. Sometimes you'll find that you hit your "second wind" after pulling back a bit - but sometimes you won't.

      Don't give up on it though - running is like other physical activities. You will improve with consistant practice.
      Last edited by krj; 04-07-2005, 02:23 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        One other thought re: giving your body time to get into a good place. I always tell candidates to give themselves at least a good 5-10 minutes of time to warm-up prior to their 1.5 run.

        Which is solid advice so you're not going into the run dead cold and spending 5 minutes of an important 12 minute run just trying to warm-up.

        But there are also many many people (I'm one of them) who takes many miles before I really feel like I'm warm-up properly (physically and mentally). I almost always run a faster last half of a run, than I do the first half. Another one of those "learn what works for YOUR body" kinda things.

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        • #5
          Thanks KRJ. That is definitely a good perspective.

          Right now I stretch for several minutes and then jog about 1/4 of a lap and then take off into a run. Currently, I'm running about an 8.5 minute mile. About 9 years ago I recall being able to run a 6.75 minute mile and put forth less effort. I did do things a little differently on the start up though. I would walk about 1/10 mile, then jog about a half mile, stop and stretching and then take off down the road.

          I wonder if my not warming up for as long is partially to blame?

          I read all of the other running threads I could find on here and they seemed to suggest that stronger ab muscles could also make things a little more tolerable. What is your opinion on this.

          Oh yes, last thing, right now I find that I can run for about 1 mile non stop and then I have to walk about a quarter lap and then I feel really rested up almost like I haven't even ran yet and I'm able to complete the rest of the lap at my normal pace. I think that my stamina is getting better.

          Your thoughts?
          Be a leader, not a follower

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Callistobass
            I'll have to defer - not at that point yet!
            I appreciate the tips. Are trying to get on with a LEA also?
            Be a leader, not a follower

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            • #7
              Originally posted by trpr2b
              Right now I stretch for several minutes and then jog about 1/4 of a lap and then take off into a run. Currently, I'm running about an 8.5 minute mile. About 9 years ago I recall being able to run a 6.75 minute mile and put forth less effort. I did do things a little differently on the start up though. I would walk about 1/10 mile, then jog about a half mile, stop and stretching and then take off down the road.

              I wonder if my not warming up for as long is partially to blame?

              I read all of the other running threads I could find on here and they seemed to suggest that stronger ab muscles could also make things a little more tolerable. What is your opinion on this.

              Oh yes, last thing, right now I find that I can run for about 1 mile non stop and then I have to walk about a quarter lap and then I feel really rested up almost like I haven't even ran yet and I'm able to complete the rest of the lap at my normal pace. I think that my stamina is getting better.

              Your thoughts?
              If you feel more comfortable running a short distance, and then stretching before you head out into your run for real I would say continue to do that (I know some runners who do just that).

              Just know that it's not really necessary to stretch before a run. The whole point in starting with gradual but progessive movement is to "warm-up" ie. raise your body systems until they reach their heightened exercise state. Stretching actually requires you to stop where you are and take a few minutes - and then start up again. Ie. body systems during that time begin to actually go back down to their pre-exercise state. Then when you start to run again, body systems have to continue cranking back up.

              So again, just figure out what works for you and what doesn't in this regard. Exercise isn't a math equation, and there's no "one right answer" - and also again, exercise is a very personal physical thing that's a unique experience for everyone, and you gotta "get in tune with your bod".

              Re: strengthening abs. Yeah, absolutely. You would also benefit from S&E training for legs, chest, back and arms. Why? Because many of these muscle groups are anchored to your spine and pelvis (ref strengthening core body muscles). A strong core aids with increased balance, muscle control and power output. Many runners also don't realize that running takes chest and arm strength and endurance - both aiding in strong and continuous arm turnover (legs follow the arms - strong and faster arm turnover translates into strong and faster leg turnover).

              Callistobass is very right - a walk and run combination is not a bad thing (especially when you are just getting back into running). Human nature is such that we want everything NOW - if we're overweight we want to lose weight and be thin right away; if we want to start running again we want to be good NOW. But it doesn't work that way.

              Whether or not we eat the right things, or exercise (or not) are called lifestyle choices because they are choices we make about how we're gonna live our lives - over the long haul. And results are not gonna be there today. And they're not gonna be there tomorrow. So you're not gonna be good at what you do right now, because it's been 9 years since you ran a 6.75. And honestly, you may NEVER run a 6.75 again. But you will get better, and feel stronger, and get faster - if you just plug away and stick it out.

              Sorry - I'm coming down from a tough race this past weekend and am feeling especially philosophical today. Don't think and analyze it TOO much. Just go run - and write back in another month (or before) and let us know how it's going.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks so much for all of the pointers. I just do NOT want to fail if/when I get to rookie school because I wasn't physically prepared. I did that about 9 years ago at NCSHP and man, that is the absolute worst feeling I have ever experienced in my entire life (quitting).

                I guess it's still somewhat of a sore spot.

                Again, thanks for the advise and I will let you know in a month how it's going.

                TRPR2B



                Originally posted by krj
                If you feel more comfortable running a short distance, and then stretching before you head out into your run for real I would say continue to do that (I know some runners who do just that).

                Just know that it's not really necessary to stretch before a run. The whole point in starting with gradual but progessive movement is to "warm-up" ie. raise your body systems until they reach their heightened exercise state. Stretching actually requires you to stop where you are and take a few minutes - and then start up again. Ie. body systems during that time begin to actually go back down to their pre-exercise state. Then when you start to run again, body systems have to continue cranking back up.

                So again, just figure out what works for you and what doesn't in this regard. Exercise isn't a math equation, and there's no "one right answer" - and also again, exercise is a very personal physical thing that's a unique experience for everyone, and you gotta "get in tune with your bod".

                Re: strengthening abs. Yeah, absolutely. You would also benefit from S&E training for legs, chest, back and arms. Why? Because many of these muscle groups are anchored to your spine and pelvis (ref strengthening core body muscles). A strong core aids with increased balance, muscle control and power output. Many runners also don't realize that running takes chest and arm strength and endurance - both aiding in strong and continuous arm turnover (legs follow the arms - strong and faster arm turnover translates into strong and faster leg turnover).

                Callistobass is very right - a walk and run combination is not a bad thing (especially when you are just getting back into running). Human nature is such that we want everything NOW - if we're overweight we want to lose weight and be thin right away; if we want to start running again we want to be good NOW. But it doesn't work that way.

                Whether or not we eat the right things, or exercise (or not) are called lifestyle choices because they are choices we make about how we're gonna live our lives - over the long haul. And results are not gonna be there today. And they're not gonna be there tomorrow. So you're not gonna be good at what you do right now, because it's been 9 years since you ran a 6.75. And honestly, you may NEVER run a 6.75 again. But you will get better, and feel stronger, and get faster - if you just plug away and stick it out.

                Sorry - I'm coming down from a tough race this past weekend and am feeling especially philosophical today. Don't think and analyze it TOO much. Just go run - and write back in another month (or before) and let us know how it's going.
                Be a leader, not a follower

                Comment


                • #9
                  every day is different and when I'm trying to boost the number of miles I'm running I'll set small goals for myself. IE run up to the fire plug, walk to the 3rd tree, pick up the run again, etc. Setting these small goals while on a run allows me to keep with in my abilities and raise my conditioning up. I'm been forced to take 6 weeks off due to a few things and so I'm starting again. I ran 2 miles this morning and plan on running 3 on Saturday and that for the rest of the next week. After that we'll be at 4 miles and I should be ready to start running long distances again.

                  As far as what we ran at the academy. We started out at about 1.5 miles and ended up around 10 or so. The staff always said we only ran 2 miles but we knew better. Keep in mind that most academies will stop a few times in the runs to make you do push ups, sit ups, jumping jacks, random screaming, etc.
                  "Respect for religion must be reestablished. Public debt should be reduced. The arrogance of public officials must be curtailed. Assistance to foreign lands must be stopped or we shall bankrupt ourselves. The people should be forced to work and not depend on government for subsistence." - Cicero, 60 B.C.

                  For California police academy notes go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CABasicPolice/

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