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  • Is 1.5mi the standard run...

    I see a lot of good information re: running and various strategies. A few questions though:

    I see a bunch or references to the 1.5 mile distance; is a 1.5 mile run pretty much the standard "test/academy" run?

    Are run time expectations fixed (std. dept guideleines) or based upon height/weight/age/sex?

    How does "running" vs. "sprinting" weigh out in the academy P/T process, if at all? I can pace myself for 1.5 mi. and time-qualify under most standards I've read here. Sprinting is a whole other matter I think.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Re: Is 1.5mi the standard run...

    Originally posted by 351-Charlie
    I see a lot of good information re: running and various strategies. A few questions though:

    I see a bunch or references to the 1.5 mile distance; is a 1.5 mile run pretty much the standard "test/academy" run?

    Are run time expectations fixed (std. dept guideleines) or based upon height/weight/age/sex?

    How does "running" vs. "sprinting" weigh out in the academy P/T process, if at all? I can pace myself for 1.5 mi. and time-qualify under most standards I've read here. Sprinting is a whole other matter I think.

    Thanks!
    The 1.5 mile is the most common distance for those departments that test. I HAVE heard about a few departments that also test at the 300m distance.

    How the test is evaluated depends on the department. Some use age/gender based norms, and some have an absolute standard (ie. one cutoff time) that everyone has to meet.

    Your best bet is to make the phone calls, and find out exactly what testing standard YOUR academy/department has.

    Comment


    • #3
      The 1.5 mile and it's times are based on the norms provided by the Cooper's Institute for Aerobics Research. Cooper's is the only current court defensible physical agility tests for Civil Service exams and annual testing of incumbants(guys on the job). While the 300m run is part of Cooper's, along with the sit and reach, standing jump, leg press, etc; only the pushups/bench, situps, and 1.5mile/12min run are court defensible and backed by Cooper.

      The percentage to pass on the run is up to the individual department but in Ohio one must pass in at least the 50th percentile to graduate from the academy.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by JRT6
        The 1.5 mile and it's times are based on the norms provided by the Cooper's Institute for Aerobics Research. Cooper's is the only current court defensible physical agility tests for Civil Service exams and annual testing of incumbants(guys on the job). While the 300m run is part of Cooper's, along with the sit and reach, standing jump, leg press, etc; only the pushups/bench, situps, and 1.5mile/12min run are court defensible and backed by Cooper.

        The percentage to pass on the run is up to the individual department but in Ohio one must pass in at least the 50th percentile to graduate from the academy.
        The cutoff times for the 1.5 vary widely across the country. Some examples (for those in the 20-29 year old category):

        New Mexico: Male (13:05) Female (15:29)

        Connecticut: Male (12:25) Female (14:49) (40% academy entrance)
        Connecticut: Male (11:49) Female (14:08) (50% academy exit)

        New York: Male (12:29) Female (15:05) (40% academy entrance)

        Mississippi: Male (18:10) Female (21:38)

        Iowa: Male (12:51) Female (15:26) (these are old Cooper Standards)

        Alabama: Single standard (15:26)

        Utah: Single standard (15:54)

        California (San Jose): Single standard 14:00

        Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research
        Single standard (40%) (15:20)
        Single standard (50%) (14:46)

        The cutoff times chosen by individual departments are determined in many different ways - among them, validation studies (job/task analysis), by adopting the standards of a similar size department, by adopting the Cooper standards, and (sometimes it seems) by just "pulling them out of the air". Keeps life interesting, eh?

        The most "court defensible" standards are actually those that are determined after a validation study has been conducted specifically for the department in question. Not always an easy thing to do though, considering the severe budget constraints that many departments face.
        Last edited by krj; 04-27-2004, 08:15 PM.

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        • #5
          KRJ - Do you know what the standard is in Virginia (30-39yr. old)?

          I realize that this may not necessarily be what dept's in my area are using but it may be a good reference for my training until I can reach someone on the facts.

          Thanks!

          Comment


          • #6
            It will vary from department to department. Two sites to check out:

            W. Virginia State Police Academy:
            http://www.wvdcjs.com/LET/letphysical.htm (run time is single standard 14:52) (Virginia state academy didn't have any standards listed)

            VA State Police (state trooper):
            http://www.vsp.state.va.us/personnel_requirements.htm
            No fitness test (just proportional height and weight and a physical)

            Arlington County Police Dept:
            http://www.co.arlington.va.us/police...iceofficer.asp
            (Just a drug test and physical - pay looks pretty good though and they have a job opening!)

            Hope this helps.
            Last edited by krj; 04-28-2004, 07:58 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by krj

              The cutoff times chosen by individual departments are determined in many different ways - among them, validation studies (job/task analysis), by adopting the standards of a similar size department, by adopting the Cooper standards, and (sometimes it seems) by just "pulling them out of the air". Keeps life interesting, eh?

              The most "court defensible" standards are actually those that are determined after a validation study has been conducted specifically for the department in question. Not always an easy thing to do though, considering the severe budget constraints that many departments face.
              Very true which is why the Coopers is being either adopted or used as a base. Cooper for instance will no longer back anything other than single standard norms which is why Ohio is using Coopers age and gender norms and is waiting to get sued to see how our standards will hold up in court.

              The only department nationwide that I'm aware of that has a "hard" single norm regardless of age and sex is South Eastern Pennsylvania Transit Authority(SEPTA). Since 90% of their officers are deployed on foot patrols and will have to respond to officers needing assistance on foot, their one and only 1.5 mile time is 12:00. 12:00 whether they've been on the job one year or twenty. The court backed up this standard in Lansing v. SEPTA 1998.

              My department is looking to implement annual standards with a very nice monetary reward for passing. The union is fighting it and the guys are complaining that you don't need to be in shape to do the job. These are the same guys who don't want a female hired unless she is as strong as the average male.

              A guy who has a heart attack running up a flight of stairs to save my life when I getting killed isn't going to help me. I don't think a cop needs to be able to run a triatholon or bench 400lbs however I thing a minimum physical standard should be mandatory. I also feel the agency should provide resources( gym time during shift or a paid gym membership) and a reward(monetary or comp time) for those who spend their own time staying in shape.

              I've said it before and I'll say it again. Coopers is a little too aerobics biased for me, I prefer the Fitforce standards however the only aerobic standard they can presently back in court is the Cooper's.
              Last edited by JRT6; 04-28-2004, 02:11 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yeah, there's been a number of different cases challenging various aspects of LE fitness testing, but SEPTA is the only case re: "single standard" that I am aware of also.

                JRT do you have a link to the FitForce standards? I have not seen these before and would be interested in taking a look at them. Thanks.
                Last edited by krj; 04-28-2004, 09:38 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  KRJ,

                  No I don't. I only had a phone number and now I can't find it. These guys have a web site but once again I can't remember it and I can't find it with a search engine. Needless to say these dudes are not marketing their product well and my certification has expired since they didn't send me any renewal stuff and I can't get a hold of them. My state of Ohio cert will have to do.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for looking around. I've heard of FitForce and have seen them listed in my travels, just don't know anything about them. If you come across stuff in the future I'd appreciate it if you would pass their info along. Thanks!

                    Comment

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