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Rest days for running. Good or bad?

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  • Rest days for running. Good or bad?

    Okay, so lately, I've been trying to get in at least 5 days of running a week in one form or another. However, I've been recently told that one should NEVER take a day off from running because one day of rest erases up to 5 days of progress. So in a seven day cycle, you could actually find yourself having made no progress whatsoever. Thoughts?
    "If the police have to come get you, they're bringing an @$$ kicking with them!"
    -Chris Rock

  • #2
    You were given bad advice. Rest is essential for improvement.

    “Truth is not what you want it to be; it is what it is, and you must bend to its power or live a lie.”

    Miyamoto Musashi

    “Life Is Hard, But It's Harder When You're Stupid”

    George V. Higgins (from The Friends of Eddie Coyle)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by slamdunc View Post
      You were given bad advice. Rest is essential for improvement.

      I thought so, I just needed a second opinion. I was debating on a rest day today after 5 days of running and now I've decided to take it because my knees were getting achy. Good to know my instincts were correct.
      "If the police have to come get you, they're bringing an @$$ kicking with them!"
      -Chris Rock

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      • #4
        Muscles become stronger by constant tearing and healing. If you don't rest, all you are doing is running yourself into a serious injury.

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        • #5
          Who ever gave you that advice just punch them in the throat and tell them it's "good for them"
          MDRDEP:

          There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

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          • #6
            I agree. You body needs test. If you are constantly pushing your your mortal body you are begging to suffer an injury. Then, if you just run through the pain, you risk exasperating it and causing serious injury; think ruptured tendon.

            You want to get running gains? Here are the tips this guy in his early-30s, me, used to go from a 20 minute 1.5 mile "run" to a 10 minute 1.5 mile run and a 4 mile run in 33 minutes by running just 3 days a week.

            1. Stretch before and after. Get the ankles, calves, quads, hips, and back.
            2. Increase distance by no more than 10% per week.
            3. Increase distance when you can run the entire distance without stopping, or there about.
            4. While training run double the distance you will be expected to run regularly.
            5. Never stop moving forward and don't walk for more than 30 seconds.
            6. Do an interval run once a week. I use 30 seconds walking, 20 seconds jogging, 10 seconds sprinting for the same distance or duration I would be at that week. Personally, one day a week I run the first half, then change to an interval for the second half. There are phone apps that will help you keep track of it; I recommend Endomondo.
            7. Avoid doing any other heavy leg exercises unless substituting for a run.
            8. Avoid running more than two days in a row and 4 days in a week. If something hurts for more than a day don't run again until it goes away.

            Good luck!
            “You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life.” ― Winston Churchill

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Gradient Shift View Post
              I agree. You body needs test. If you are constantly pushing your your mortal body you are begging to suffer an injury. Then, if you just run through the pain, you risk exasperating it and causing serious injury; think ruptured tendon.

              You want to get running gains? Here are the tips this guy in his early-30s, me, used to go from a 20 minute 1.5 mile "run" to a 10 minute 1.5 mile run and a 4 mile run in 33 minutes by running just 3 days a week.

              1. Stretch before and after. Get the ankles, calves, quads, hips, and back.
              2. Increase distance by no more than 10% per week.
              3. Increase distance when you can run the entire distance without stopping, or there about.
              4. While training run double the distance you will be expected to run regularly.
              5. Never stop moving forward and don't walk for more than 30 seconds.
              6. Do an interval run once a week. I use 30 seconds walking, 20 seconds jogging, 10 seconds sprinting for the same distance or duration I would be at that week. Personally, one day a week I run the first half, then change to an interval for the second half. There are phone apps that will help you keep track of it; I recommend Endomondo.
              7. Avoid doing any other heavy leg exercises unless substituting for a run.
              8. Avoid running more than two days in a row and 4 days in a week. If something hurts for more than a day don't run again until it goes away.

              Good luck!
              ^^This.

              Interval training is an excellent way to decrease your running times and increase your over all stamina. I've also found stair exercises to be beneficial to any training regiment.

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              • #8
                I passed a Cooper test back in May at the 50% in all but the 1.5 mile run, which I got in the 40% (12:10). The test was all at the 30% so it was all good though. I have another one coming up that will be at the 50% so I just need to shave off at least 12 seconds, though I obviously hope to do better than that.. I've been doing 3-4 mile runs mostly about 3-4 times a week, and I've been playing soccer at least once a week for about 2 hours at a time (usually about 3 games with about 5-10 minute breaks in between), so that's helped the cardio. I'll change up one of my regular long run days and make it an interval day.
                "If the police have to come get you, they're bringing an @$$ kicking with them!"
                -Chris Rock

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Gradient Shift View Post
                  1. Stretch before and after. Get the ankles, calves, quads, hips, and back.
                  2. Increase distance by no more than 10% per week.
                  3. Increase distance when you can run the entire distance without stopping, or there about.
                  4. While training run double the distance you will be expected to run regularly.
                  5. Never stop moving forward and don't walk for more than 30 seconds.
                  6. Do an interval run once a week. I use 30 seconds walking, 20 seconds jogging, 10 seconds sprinting for the same distance or duration I would be at that week. Personally, one day a week I run the first half, then change to an interval for the second half. There are phone apps that will help you keep track of it; I recommend Endomondo.
                  7. Avoid doing any other heavy leg exercises unless substituting for a run.
                  8. Avoid running more than two days in a row and 4 days in a week. If something hurts for more than a day don't run again until it goes away.
                  Agree with all this, except #1: Warm up, THEN stretch, THEN run.

                  Also, Fartlek training can help increase your natural pace. When you run a distance your body tends to go on autopilot and run at it's natural pace, which for most people is slower than it needs to be. The sprint/jog rhythm of Fartlek tends to help your body increase that pace.

                  Also, running 1/2 your expected distance in 1/3 the time can increase your pace. Running 1.5 your expected distance in 1.5 your goal time can increase your endurance. ie: if your goal is 2 miles in 16 minutes, shoot for 1 mile in 6 minutes and 3 miles in 18 minutes as well.

                  Last, cardio workouts that aren't running can help your body recover while still working your cardio-respiratory system. Swimming, biking, crossfit style whole-body workouts...
                  Last edited by tanksoldier; 07-22-2014, 10:58 PM.
                  "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                  "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GangGreen712 View Post
                    I passed a Cooper test back in May at the 50% in all but the 1.5 mile run, which I got in the 40% (12:10). The test was all at the 30% so it was all good though. I have another one coming up that will be at the 50% so I just need to shave off at least 12 seconds, though I obviously hope to do better than that.. I've been doing 3-4 mile runs mostly about 3-4 times a week, and I've been playing soccer at least once a week for about 2 hours at a time (usually about 3 games with about 5-10 minute breaks in between), so that's helped the cardio. I'll change up one of my regular long run days and make it an interval day.
                    You can toss some rounds of wind sprints in after your games.

                    Originally posted by tanksoldier View Post
                    Agree with all this, except #1: Warm up, THEN stretch, THEN run.
                    Yeah, sorry, that. I always incorrectly equate stretching and warming-up as being one in the same since I do both at the same time and I do more of a warm-up than a stretch.
                    “You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life.” ― Winston Churchill

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Id also look into Tabata training, I've found that to be pretty useful as well.

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                      • #12
                        Look into doing some burpees too, they are an effective full body and cardio workout. If I do about 200 burpees in a workout (i.e. 20 burpees and then a 30 second break, or an ab workout as a break, and then repeart until 200), I'm far more spent than I am after a 3 mile run.
                        "Nothing worth having comes without some kind of fight."

                        Sergeant, U.S. Army - 2010 to Present.

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