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  • Battling the pounds...

    I have heard and seen (especially on TV) endless methods in controlling weight. My weight fluctuates dramatically. One week I can weigh about 190, a couple of weeks later, little over 200 lbs. I am trying to believe its water weight. My diet has been the same throughout my life, with the exception that I go out to eat more on the weekends. I have a decent workout schedule which consists of running or aerobic exercises three times a week with alternating days for weight lifting. What is the best method to maintain an ideal weight? Is it a good idea to try and burn fat using light weights at an aerobic pace or just do regular weights conventionally (ei. sets)?
    "Its not cheating, unless you get caught."-Al Bundy

  • #2
    Each person reacts different to weight loss methods. I tried to loose weight one year and was running four days a week. I thought that would do it but I lost less than ten pounds. I changed my diet to just eating smaller portions and no regular soft drinks. I lost thirty five pounds over the course of three months. I found that with the weight gone I could run much farther than I could ever before. It was the best physically I felt in my life.

    Comment


    • #3
      GCPD0171 has got it right - when he started eating smaller portions and losing the soft drinks, while also continuing to be physically active, he lost weight.

      For every new weight loss plan that gets put out there, success always comes down to one thing:

      If you consume more calories than you expend you will gain weight
      If you consume the same number of calories as you expend your weight will remain stable
      If you consume less calories than you expend you will lose weight.

      It's as simple as that. And as difficult as that.

      Stay safe.

      Comment


      • #4
        Reply

        As well as cutting out the pops, cut out simple carbs such as the pastas and white breads. Right there you will drop another 10. Just use your common sense, don't eat right before bed, or sit down on the couch after a big meal. Take a casual stroll instead. Don't skip meals. If you go too long after a meal, your body switches gears, the next meal you will have will be stored as fat so that you can survive the next fast. If you know you may have to skip a meal, take some healthy snacks with you.

        You can excersise as much as you like, but the biggest missing link in weight control is the nutrition factor. I agree on the aforementioned 5 meals and make them smaller, and healthier. You wil adjust to this rapidly. You and your body will thank yourself.

        Good luck, and kick some ***, with your new lean ***!
        We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves.

        - Galileo Galilei, In Education

        Comment


        • #5
          GCPD0171 has got it right - when he started eating smaller portions and losing the soft drinks, while also continuing to be physically active, he lost weight.

          For every new weight loss plan that gets put out there, success always comes down to one thing:

          If you consume more calories than you expend you will gain weight
          If you consume the same number of calories as you expend your weight will remain stable
          If you consume less calories than you expend you will lose weight.

          It's as simple as that. And as difficult as that.

          Stay safe.

          Comment


          • #6
            It seems that I have posted the same message twice. Unfortunately I'm computer semi-illiterate - can anyone take one of these postings off the board for me?

            Thanks
            krj

            Comment


            • #7
              Just a couple of quick points:

              1. Weight lifting isn't an aerobic activity even if you do lots of reps. Lift in regular sets to whatever extent you want to stimulate muscle growth and/or maintain good muscle tone of any specific muscle group; watch the fats and simple carbs to whatever extent you are concerned about weight gain, and do some cardio to maintain aerobic fitness, burn some calories, and raise your resting metabolic rate a bit for the few hours afterwards.

              2. I've already addressed this in detail in other threads, but the thing about not eating before bed is an absolute myth and it's completely untrue. WHAT you eat matters; WHEN you eat doesn't. Avoid eating before bed ONLY if it causes you physical discomfort or gastrointestinal problems, or interferes with your sleep. Do not avoid eating at night in the false belief that the same food eaten late at night is more likely to "turn to fat" than if eaten during the day. Same goes for walking (etc) after eating: it may aid digestion a bit, but it has zero effect on whether or not (or to what extent) you store fat because nothing you eat gets "burned" during physical activity for at LEAST 12-36 hours, and it's much closer to 36 hours than 12 hours.

              3. I agree with eating smaller meals more often and not skipping meals, but for different reasons: eight or ten hours without eating isn't going to shift your body into a fasting metabolism because it just doesn't happen that quickly or that easily. Avoid skippping meals simply because you're more likely to overeat at your next opportunity, but that's about it. Also, satiety has a slight lag time, so when you eat a smaller meal that leaves you feeling like you could have eaten a bit more, that feeling often vanishes ten or twenty minutes after you eat. Conversely, when you eat large meals, you eat until you feel full at that moment and you end up eating much more. A simple trick is ordering (or serving yourself) smaller portions and then going back for more if you want more, because you generally will finish whatever portions you take (or buy) even if it's more than you really need to feel satisfied in smaller portions.
              No longer ignoring anybody here, since that psycho known as "Josey Wales" finally got the boot after being outed as a LE imposter by B&G978. Nice job.

              Comment


              • #8
                Just to clear the air.

                I was never referring to eating late at night to having anything to do with it being stored as fat, I was referring to digestion. And the you are not correct in the metabolism part either. In mesomorphic and Endomorphic samo-body types, matabolism is affected by eating habits. And the body starts breaking muscle down and using up protien stores. You should check the latest reasearch on this.

                I have to get back to work, but if you are still interested, I can find links to medical documentation on this.
                We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves.

                - Galileo Galilei, In Education

                Comment


                • #9
                  Spelling correction.

                  I just read my post, It should be Somatype
                  We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves.

                  - Galileo Galilei, In Education

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Just to clear the air....you are not correct in the metabolism part either. In mesomorphic and Endomorphic samo-body types, matabolism is affected by eating habits. And the body starts breaking muscle down and using up protien stores. You should check the latest reasearch on this. I have to get back to work, but if you are still interested, I can find links to medical documentation on this.

                    Excuse my coughing...but the air suddenly got very fouled in here.
                    Actually, it's somatotype, not "somatype".

                    Listen. Your somatotype determines things like whether you store fat readily or build muscles easily; it does not magically allow endomorphs (those who get fat easily) or mesomorphs (naturally muscular people) to magically process or "burn" food while it's still sloshing around your stomach and intestines.

                    What bothers me most about that post is that somatotypes have absolutely NOTHING to do with the issue we're discussing (namely, whether or not skipping one meal triggers a fasting phase in ANYBODY), and it seems thrown in as a buzzword merely to detract from the issue at hand and/or as an attempt to sound knowledgeable on the topic.

                    Yes, by all means PLEASE post a link right here to ANY "medical documentation" suggesting that your body goes into a catabolic starvation phase and starts breaking down muscle for energy when you miss ONE MEAL. That is something that happens with PROLONGED fasting and not from missing a meal here and there.

                    I don't mind your disagreeing with me, but I absolutely can't STAND being told "you're wrong" publicly and then reading utter nonsense and some open-ended inference that there exists some "medical documentation" to prove that nonsense. I don't want to argue this topic because I doubt anybody here is interested, but you have found no such "documentation" and you know it. If there is, just POST IT.

                    While you're at it, also please post your "latest research" sources indicating that the the body "stores protein", because all the "old" research and accepted medical science says that protein is either synthesized into new muscle, broken down and stored (although much less efficiently than carbohydrates are) as GLYCOGEN, or converted into fat when you overeat sufficiently. Glycogen that originates from protein is indisdinguishible from glycogen that originates from carbohydrates, it's just that similar amounts of protein YIELDS less glycogen than carbohydrates. There are no "protein stores", that get "burned for energy" and catabolism refers to burning MUSCLE for energy, (not "protein") which is an EXTREME life saving biological mechanism that is triggered only in extreme circumstances.

                    Thank you.
                    Last edited by ProWriter; 08-28-2003, 01:12 AM.
                    No longer ignoring anybody here, since that psycho known as "Josey Wales" finally got the boot after being outed as a LE imposter by B&G978. Nice job.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Here are some general guidelines re: the issue of nutrition and weight control:

                      The major components of nutrition are:

                      Carbohydrates: your body looks to carbs first as a source of energy for working muscles - majority of your diet should come from complex carbohydrates

                      Protein: main role of protein is to build and repair body tissue. Your body uses protein as a source of energy if carbohydrate intake is low

                      Fat: major function is to protect vital organs and supply us with energy stores

                      Vitamins and Minerals: required in small amounts, play an important supportive role in energy production and oxygen transportation

                      Water: is the main component of blood (therefore important for distributing oxygen and nutrients to the body), plays a major role in body temperature regulation

                      All of these nutrients work in concert with each other, and each are considered to be an integral component of good health. In terms of weight management a diet rich in complex carbohydrates, and low in fat (and particularly saturated fat)is strongly suggested.

                      Because many adults do not eat a wide variety of foods from all food groups it is also suggested that adults take a daily multi-vitamin.

                      Eating smaller and more frequent meals throughout the day now seems to be suggested in the literature (over the 3 squares we all grew up with). Eating regularly throughout the day aids in regulating blood sugar levels - important for stablizing energy levels, as well as concentration and mood so you do not feel the need to reach for the candy bars mid-morning or mid-afternoon.

                      Reading food labels is something everyone should know how to do, so that they understand fully what they're consuming. There's a lot of information on the label, but to keep it quick and simple the stuff you really need to know is:

                      1. serving size (located at the top of the label) - are you eating one, two or more servings?

                      2. calories per serving (next line down the label)

                      3. fat calories (across from cal/serv.) - if your ice-cream bar has 350 calories in it, how many of those are fat calories??

                      4. total fat (next line down) - you want it as low as possible

                      Next time you go to the grocery store try picking up a box of Cheerios and a box of Fruit Loops and compare the above items. Or next time you're deciding which jelly or peanut butter to buy to put on your toast, or what brand of yogurt to buy - it really becomes almost second nature after a few practices. And once you have the total calories, fat calories, serving size thing down you can check out some of the other information that's on the labels to help us make healthier food choices.

                      Reading food labels is also a real learning experience in terms of what a "serving size" actually is - most people are usually shocked to see how small a serving size can be. I eat 3 servings of dry cereral and 2 servings of milk for breakfast - it's just one little bowl of cereal to me. But according to government standards I have just eaten half of all my daily requirements of one food group, and one third-one half of my daily requirments from another food group (and I haven't even stepped outside my front door yet)

                      A big reason that portion sizes have gotten so out of hand (and why our daily calorie consumption has also gotten out of control) is that we now eat so many meals outside the home - and Americans are suckers for a deal (39 cents to supersize my meal? Sounds like a deal to me!!). Nobody in this country wants to go to a steak house, and get a baked potatoe, a huge salad and three ouces of steak. We're there for the MEAT - and lots of it - not the lousy lettuce!

                      Increasing physical activity is also considered to be an integral component of a healthy weight management program for a few reasons:

                      It burns calories while you are exercising

                      It also helps to speed up your metabolism over the short term as well as the long term. Short term - you continue to burn calories at a higher than normal rate for a few hours after you have finished your exercise session. Long term - when you are physically active you tend to have a higher percentage of muscle and a lower percentage of body fat than inactive people. Muscle is more metabolically active than fat - meaning those who have more muscle burn more calories (even when they are at rest)

                      As an aside, it should also be noted that healthy behaviors tend to breed other healthy behaviors. This means that once an indivual has even a moderate amount of success in one area of health enhancement, they tend to want to see other successes. Eg. someone who starts walking, eventually works up to running, and then decides they want to quit smoking to make their running better. Or they start running again after many years, stick with it for a while, then decide they want to lose a few pounds, or they lose a few pounds and then decide to start walking on a treadmill at the gym etc.

                      There has been much conversation on this forum regarding other types of eating strategies. Some thoughts re: this:

                      Information
                      I would really caution people who read this forum to chose their information sources wisely - we are talking about issues more important than how much someone weighs today - we're talking about people's health and overall wellness.

                      Health, fitness and nutrition are all extremely complex and constantly developing fields of study. I would encourage people to spend some time reading and become as educated as you can. This forum can be a place to start, but I don't believe that it should be your only source of information. I also do not believe that TV infomercials, commercials, and/or the latest diet book should be the only source that you base your decisions on.

                      There is a lot of really good, solid, consumer-friendly information out there (and they all have websites). Some of them include (but there are many others):

                      American Dietetic Association
                      Department of Health and Human Services
                      Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
                      American Heart Association
                      US Food and Drug Administration
                      National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

                      If you decide to go high fat........
                      There is a saying "anyone can lose weight if they only shop in 2 aisles of the grocery store"

                      Fat isn't the bad guy, and carbohydrates aren't the bad guy - eating too much and exercising too little is the bad guy. If you chose to eat a high fat, low carbohydrate diet I would really encourage you to:

                      1. take a multi-vitamin
                      2. find a way to get some fruits and vegetables - not only for the vitamins/minerals, but also the anti-oxidants that research continues to prove help combat some forms of cancer
                      3. drink water and other fluids regularly throughout the day (good advice for all of us)
                      4. remember that not all fats are created equal - saturated fat (animal fats such as lard, butter, margarine - those that stay solid at room temperature)continue to be shown to contribute to heart disease, high cholesterol, and according to some research - breast cancer. Unsaturated fats (those derived from plants - canola oil, sunflowerseed oil, olive oil) continue to be shown as being heart healthy. Use plant based fats whenever you can
                      5. continue to have your blood pressure and cholesterol levels monitored regularly (at least annually)

                      Didn't mean to turn this into a novel. Thanks everyone.

                      Stay safe

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        KRJ:

                        If one had to apologize merely for the length of one's posts I'd be doing nothing on this forum BUT apologizing. IMO, it's fine as long as you know what you're talking about (which you seem to). What is your background in this field if you don't mind my asking? I have one or two comments only because this thread started as a question about losing weight (vs healthful nutrition); I also have one question that is not intended to sound rhetorical at all, because it's a genuine question that I've never understood myself:

                        I agree with everything in your post, but I have always been puzzled by the relevance of caring what PERCENTAGE (calories from)fat any item of food is, especially, if you're already monitoring your OVERALL fat consumption by the gram. I've always told people to ignore that particular line so as not to be confused by it. If you're counting fat grams all that counts is staying under your target number, and if you're under it enough to still "afford" 10 or 15gms of fat, who cares if 60% of the calories in that specific item is fat, as long as it doesn't tip your daily (or weekly) fat gram total out of balance? Conversely, I've read plenty of labels indicating that an item of food has an acceptable PERCENTAGE of fat from calories, but contained more (absolute) grams of fat than I thought that particular food item was "worth" to me.

                        I also agree with the distinction between "good" and "bad" fats, but since this thread started out about losing weight, I'd like to point out that in (only) THAT respect (and not health), fat is fat is fat, and "good" fats will make you exactly as fat as will "bad" fats. My only reason for pointing that out is the number of times people who ask me about losing weight proudly tell me they are trying to eat only "good" fats in order to do so.

                        Finally, on the subject of learning to read food labels, I'd just like to remind people that ingredients are also always listed in order of predominance, so it's important to note whether an ingredient (sugar, for example) is first or second on the list, or almost last on the list. Most children's cereal, for example, (and many pastries) list sugar as their very FIRST ingredient, meaning they contain more sugar than ANYTHING else on the ingredient list. Just something else to keep in mind.
                        Last edited by ProWriter; 08-28-2003, 01:03 AM.
                        No longer ignoring anybody here, since that psycho known as "Josey Wales" finally got the boot after being outed as a LE imposter by B&G978. Nice job.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          ProWriter,

                          Your point re: "good" and "bad" fats as they relate to weight loss is well taken. Unsaturated fats are a healthier choice in terms of not being a contributing factor for heart disease. But I agree that in terms of weight loss fat is fat, and it still ultimately comes down to calories in/calories out.

                          Re: importance of calories from fat
                          It is generally recommended that no more than 30% of your daily calorie intake should come from fat. That means that if your daily calorie consumption is 2000, no more than 600 total calories should come from fat.

                          Having said that though, I'm gonna backtrack a bit. I would still suggest becoming familiar with serving sizes and calories per serving. In terms of keeping tabs on fat consumption however, your approach is just plain easier to track (it's easier to read a label and buy foods with a total fat/per serving of X grams, than it is to keep up with total fat calories over the course of a day).

                          From a personal perspective, I try not to eat anything that has more than 6 grams of fat/serving (OK, not all the time - I like ice-cream. Life is too short to not eat crap sometimes!). For those who have two or more risk factors for heart disease, I would suggest keeping it at 3g/serving.

                          Re: ingredient labels - I agree. There are huge differences in the quality of food items (even those that look the same at first glance). For example, you can look at two different brands of peanut butter (which is widely considered to be a healthy food) - one jar will have sugar as the first ingredient, one jar will have peanuts as the first ingredient.

                          Re: my background
                          I probably should have introduced myself before now - as soon as I have more time I will head over to the intro board and do that.

                          Pleased to be here.

                          krj

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Fat.

                            First off,
                            Pro writer, I am apparently busier here at the office than usual this time of year, however, in the future if you are still interested I will find the medical journals from which my information was gathered.

                            On the topic of fat however, it is just as important as all the other nutrients in ones diet. Fat is essential for the proper functioning of the body. Fats provide the "essential" fatty acids, which are not made by the body and must be obtained from food. Linoleic acid is the most important essential fatty acid, especially for the growth and development of infants. Fatty acids provide the raw materials that help in the control of blood pressure, blood clotting, inflammation, and other body functions.

                            Healthy skin and hair are maintained by fat. Fat helps in the absorption, and transport through the bloodstream of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K.

                            I guess that we can all go on forever with this, for it is an topic which has more girth than our brother "Beenstick" whom asked for help in the first place.

                            Beenstick, I think that life is too short to work about a frivolous 10 pounds, which you are fluctuating. As long as you are enjoying life, and having a good time, enjoying eating the foods that you eat, what the heck, what is a couple of extra pounds? It is not as if you are 30 - 40 pounds overweight, am I correct?

                            Good luck, and for Gods sakes, if you exercise regularly, and follow a relatively healthy lifestyle... F-it, and enjoy it.
                            We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves.

                            - Galileo Galilei, In Education

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks guys for the insight and tips. Just to clearify, i am 5'10" of average build. In my early 20s, I weighed about 175 and maintained it for a few years up until about a year or so. Then all of a sudden, I hit 185, which I can deal with, but gradually I saw myself getting a couple of pounds heavier as weeks progressed, until what is now my current ordeal. If I "smoke" myself long enough I will get back down to 190. But If I let up a little, its back up to 200 pounds, which is very frustrating.

                              I go out to eat on the weekends, usually lunch and dinner on saturday, my "break day." I have cut soda out of my diet as well as french fries and similar greasy foods. I avoid fast food all together and instead go to restaurants that offer actual meals. I dont believe in fad diets, but I do awknowledge that it is important to eat in moderation. Something I always have in mind when I do eat. I just dont want to live out life being active and have a body which doesnt cooperate. These extra 20 lbs that i cant get rid off always go to the gut, which ticks me off, making look like I weigh 300 lbs. I hope its not genetics or else i am screwed.

                              I am hoping to find a good workout routine or style that is efficient in burning calories.


                              Either way thanks all for the help.
                              "Its not cheating, unless you get caught."-Al Bundy

                              Comment

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