Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shoulder pain...

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Se7en
    replied
    Thanks for the information.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcioccke
    replied
    http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/p...cuff-disorders

    Leave a comment:


  • jcioccke
    replied
    Thanks Norco- I think a lot of my issues come from when I first got heavy into lifting I wasn't doing any warming up or stretching and I wanted to move up into weight fast. My current problem could possibly be I overdue it when lifting. Typically on chest day, I'll do three sets on the bench, three sets with dumbbells, and then I'll go do a couple chest machines. Not sure if that's too much for one day or not.
    Are you stretching when done? It doesn't sound like your Rotator Cuff but I could be wrong. Try these tests below

    Your doctor may conduct tests to find out whether you have subacromial impingement or a tear in the rotator cuff.

    Tests for subacromial impingement
    Tests for rubbing of the tendon on the bone (impingement) are based on whether certain movements cause pain and discomfort. To test for impingement, your doctor may have you:

    1.Raise your arm straight out in front to shoulder height (forward flexion).
    2.Raise your arm out to your side (abduction).
    3.Do either step 1 or step 2 and ask you to rotate your arm or rotate your arm for you.
    4.Do either step 1 or step 2 and apply resistance to your arm.
    Your doctor will consider how painful these movements are to you and, if there was pain, what position your shoulder was in.

    Another test involves injecting a pain reliever (such as lidocaine) into the bursa and near the rotator cuff tendons of your shoulder (subacromial space injection). If this relieves your pain, then you probably have rotator cuff abrasion or subacromial bursitis. Your doctor may then inject corticosteroids into the area to reduce inflammation. But if your shoulder is still weak after the injection of anesthetic, the problem may be a rotator cuff tear.

    Tests for a rotator cuff tear
    The main symptoms of a complete rotator cuff tear are pain and weakness. Tests for rotator cuff tears include the following:

    Drop arm test: Hold your arm straight out to your side (90 degrees) with your thumb down. Lower your arm slowly. If it drops suddenly, you probably have a rotator cuff tear.
    Hold your arm straight out to the side, level with your shoulder, with your palm facing down (hand in a fist). Your doctor will press your arm down to determine your strength in this position.
    Raise your arm straight in front about shoulder height (90 degrees) and turn your wrist so your thumb points toward the floor. Your doctor will try to push your arm down against your resistance. If your rotator cuff is weak or torn, you will not be able to hold your arm steady as your doctor pushes down on it.
    Raise your arm straight in front about shoulder height (90 degrees) and turn your palm up toward the ceiling. Your doctor will try to force your hand downward against your resistance. If your rotator cuff is weak or torn, you will not be able to hold your arm steady as your doctor pushes down on it. If you have more pain or weakness in this position, you may also have bicep tendon damage.
    Hold your arm at your side, bend your elbow, and turn your wrist so your thumb points toward the ceiling. Your doctor will try to force your hand in toward your stomach as you resist by trying to rotate your arm outward. If your rotator cuff is weak or torn, you will not be able to hold your arm steady as your doctor pushes on it.
    The touchdown test: Raise your arms alongside your ears, with your palms facing inward. Your doctor will stand behind you and push your arms forward. If you have trouble resisting this, you may have a rotator cuff tear.
    The specific movements that cause pain or weakness are clues to the location of a rotator cuff tear.

    Why It Is Done

    Leave a comment:


  • jcioccke
    replied
    You may want to switch up arms when masturbating

    jk

    Leave a comment:


  • Sgt. Slaughter
    replied
    Uh...if you're torquing your rotator cuff - it's too much.

    Leave a comment:


  • Se7en
    replied
    Thanks Norco- I think a lot of my issues come from when I first got heavy into lifting I wasn't doing any warming up or stretching and I wanted to move up into weight fast. My current problem could possibly be I overdue it when lifting. Typically on chest day, I'll do three sets on the bench, three sets with dumbbells, and then I'll go do a couple chest machines. Not sure if that's too much for one day or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dellde
    replied
    I prefer to use dumbbells. You're not restricted by the bar. I can angle my shoulders in a way that doesn't put bad tension on them.

    Leave a comment:


  • NORCOCOP
    replied
    If you bench this is going to happen eventually. First thing you need to do is make sure its not a tear. From there start looking at your form used on pressing movements. A small percentage of lifters perform thier lifts correctly. The higher you climb in numbers the more obvious the effect. Use this as a form check and re evaluate all of the big lifts. You may find improvements across the board. I have had this happen several times over the past 12 years or so of lifting. I am always refining my warm ups, form, and such. If you need to take video of your lifts and compare it against the pros.

    I find this especially helpful on my squats. I don't have a partner and no one in my gym or department lifts, heavy or properly so getting human feedback is not a possibility. Some forums online have profesionals that will give feedback on form if you post. I know this is beyond the initial scope of the question. But I am a big believer in taking care of our own. Sometimes going after the cause is way more effective than just putting out the fires of the symptoms.

    I find the sites, exrx, t-nation, and elite lifts, all helpful resources for info on various lifts and techniques. t-nation has a recent article on how to bench better and avoiding shoulder problems. Purusing sites like bodybuilding.com and other wanna be lifting forums is just confusing.

    This is all just my opinion I not a professional. I have managed to lift for quite some time, mostly heavy and avoided any plaguing/reoccuring injuries. I have found my body much happier since I switched to power style lifts as opposed the body building style I used initially.

    Good luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sgt. Slaughter
    replied
    Fo' shizzle.

    Leave a comment:


  • Se7en
    replied
    Thanks Slaughter.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sgt. Slaughter
    replied
    Possibly, but it'd be a micro tear if anything. If you had a partial or full tear you'd probably know it. The only way to know for sure is to get contrast dye injected into the shoulder capsule and then have an MRI done. They'll be able to spot the tear if there even is one.

    You CAN gave an inflamed cuff like I had - no tear, not even microscopic.

    Leave a comment:


  • Se7en
    replied
    Thanks guys.... could be it... do you think the inflammation could come from a tear to the rotator cuff?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sgt. Slaughter
    replied
    Try OTC anti-inflammatory meds too. In the shoulder region, inflammation (aka swelling) can pinch nerves and blood vessels.

    Leave a comment:


  • Se7en
    replied
    Thanks for both responses... I do need to get it checked, I just don't want to hear something is wrong with one of my rotator cuffs (ugh).

    Leave a comment:


  • Sgt. Slaughter
    replied
    While you can't really "stretch" the rotator cuff (cuz they're connective tissue) you CAN stretch the muscles that are attached there. Apply some heat to the related muscles, stretch and/or get a deep tissue massage.

    Leave a comment:

MR300x250 Tablet

Collapse

What's Going On

Collapse

There are currently 8328 users online. 261 members and 8067 guests.

Most users ever online was 19,482 at 12:44 PM on 09-29-2011.

Welcome Ad

Collapse
Working...
X